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11

You could try mgetty. Mgetty is a ‘‘smart’’ getty replacement, designed to be used with hayes compatible data and data/fax modems. Mgetty knows about modem initial- ization, manual modem answering (so your modem doesn’t answer if the machine isn’t ready), UUCP locking (so you can use the same device for dial-in ...


7

From what you say (serial interface, AT command set), I think it would behave like a dial-up modem. Thus you could use something like wvdial or ppp to connect using it. Also, this repo on GitHub looks relevant: This repository serves to group together a bunch of scripts I've been writing to assist in the development process with the Telit 862GPS. They ...


7

The HylaFAX Handbook has some documentation about making sure you have a compatible fax device. According to that document, external serial modems will work almost without exception, but some external USB modems may be softmodems and require a driver. Regarding internal modems, that document references some chipsets and model numbers that are known to work. ...


6

The easiest way to use linux to answer the phone is with the Asterisk program. You should be able to yum install asterisk on your linux machine. You then connect an analog adapter to your network and connect your phone line through it. This will allow you to answer the call, see the caller id if the caller id information is sent from your LEC, record the ...


4

External modems that plug into a serial (RS232) or USB port usually have all the necessary electronics. Most Winmodems (requiring Windows software to supplement their deficiencies) are internal. “Hayes compatible” or a mention of compatibility with DOS, OS/2, Linux, SCO, or anything other than Windows is an indication that the modem will just work under any ...


4

I wouldn't recommend using a typical data/voice modem for this. Even 15 years ago, when modems were current technology and there was lots of competition for features and technology, they were a pretty low-grade way to do the sorts of things you're asking for. Now, after a decade of race-to-the-bottom activity exemplified by the near universal takeover of ...


4

If you want to turn a serial port into a network interface, that is exactly what PPP (pppd) was designed to do. It'll work over anything that looks like a serial port to Linux. pppd supports sending out "chat text" which contains the necessary AT commands to setup and teardown the call. You'll probably want to make your own chat script for this device. ...


3

I'm with @Renan: it looks like this problem was fixed in newer kernels. (One such thread on LKML.) The key error is the invalid interface number one. It means the USB driver sees the device, but it's numbering its features (interfaces) in a way the driver doesn't expect, and it can't cope. Googling around, you can find several cases where people are fixing ...


3

The CUA devices are both serial ports. 3G modems have often 1 to 3 serial ports. One of them is the communication port and the rest are control and monitor ports that you can use for e.g. checking the signal level (with AT commands) while connected. The first port is almost always the communication port that you should use. You can see if dmesg gives any ...


3

If you loosen the requirement for using ttyUSB0 - ttyUSB31, then you may just have a possibility. What I've done is let udev create symlinks to the device nodes assigned by the kernel. You cannot reliably hardwire a physical device to use ttyUSB0, you can however reliably add a symlink ttyUSB001 to point to whichever device node you want. The trick here is ...


3

Doing a search on Google for this, I (hopefully) found the answer to your question on: Ubuntu Forums. It shows the exact steps to download the E353.tar.gz file and shows the instructions on how to install it. Hope it helps.


3

The plain protocol is specifically designed to do what you request. With MPTCP you can establish a connection to your peer tell the peer your available endpoints (like IP address of ppp0 and eth0) from this point all negotiated paths can be used, but you also can define one link as active and the others as fallback If one of your paths fails, MPTCP will ...


2

You could play a little with cts, rts or other serial status lines and check if the modem responds to lowering/raising that signal correspondingly. But your modem may be configured to ignore these lines, or there might be other devices that also react to those changes. I think psusi got the correct answer. I remember I once debugged hylafax to get the idea ...


2

You could try taking a look at mgetty, though I never tried anything of the sorts. Smart Modem getty replacement Mgetty is a versatile program to handle all aspects of a modem under Unix. This package includes basic modem data capabilities. Install mgetty-fax to get the additional functionality for fax. Install mgetty-voice to get the functionality ...


2

As much as this question is very old and answered. I would like to add something further. For USB modems, "cdc-acm" compliant USB modems will present themselves as a serial device. They are usually self contained and small, with all required hardware. Latest verisions of linux kernel has a module to support these kind of devices out of the box. Some ...


2

you can only see the signal strength by adding this line into wvdial.conf : Init4 = AT+CSQ The Values are Min-Max = 0 - 30. For the type of connection you can only see it by the lights on the device. EDIT: AT^SYSINFO gives different useful information, among these is the connection type.


2

chat & pppd chat is a program that the pppd program can use to dial a modem connection. It is provided with a script of that describes the conversation required to establish the connection. (A conversation in this context is a series of commands issued by chat, and responses received from the modem.) pon & poff pon and poff are commands used to ...


2

Check /etc/ppp/options. DO NOT Edit this file, rather copy it to some location and make edit. check this: # Disable Address/Control compression negotiation (use default, i.e. # address/control field disabled). #-ac More info you can find here in the PPP-HOWTO.


2

I believe you can use Wireshark to determine why these packets are being retransmitted. Excerpted from this thread in the Wireshark forum, titled: Wireshark-users: Re: [Wireshark-users] tcp errors detection. excerpt #1 On Sun, Apr 18, 2010 at 4:17 PM, Victor lyamtsev wrote: Hi, how can i locate retransmission error for TCP sequence in ...


2

man interface-order first. There is a way as well to ignore some settings that DHCP provides. Check for prepend and request options at man dhclient.conf


1

Solution 1: Run dmesg and watch out for ttyUSB* lines if your modem interface is a classical emulated serial interface. Solution 2: Browse /sys/bus/usb/devices/X-1:Y:*/ until you find useful information. Based on your line Bus 003 Device 013: ID 0421:0007 Nokia Mobile Phones, i would guess X=3 and Y= 12 (13 minus one). Solution 3: Run udevadm monitor as ...


1

I believe you can use the command ppstats -z to display compression statistics. If it displays all zeros then compression is not enabled. excerpt from man page -z Instead of the standard display, show statistics indicating the performance of the packet compression algorithm in use. When the -z option is specified, instead displays the ...


1

Assuming you have a more recent version than 0.9.6: $ nmcli --version nmcli tool, version 0.9.8.8-2.fc19 You can create devices like so via the command line using the dev commands within nmcli: excerpt from nmcli man page nmcli dev wifi con "Cafe Hotspot 1" password caffeine name "My cafe" creates a new connection named "My cafe" and then ...


1

I came across this Chromium project post that shows what you want. It's titled: Debugging a cellular modem. excerpt from that page Communicating directly with a modem with the AT command set Most modems support AT commands which control the modem and query for information. On a Chromium OS device with the developer mode enabled, you can use the ...


1

Check to see if modem-manager is running -- and kill it if it is. If it thinks that the device is a modem, it will step in and try to dial the modem also. This fixed as similar problem for me recently.


1

Web search suggests this modem knows AT command set, so you can easily check this using "tip" or "cu" commands with both ports and detect which one responds to AT.


1

Wait—I see it. Two things: You used ATTRS{product}=="6011" when you meant ATTRS{idProduct}=="6011" That missing id will break it. Copy-and-paste from udevadm info --attribute-walk to prevent typos like this. Your pattern is wrong; it should be KERNEL=="ttyUSB[0-9]*". Its a (very limited) regular expression, so [0-15]* means "any of the characters 0–1 or 5, ...


1

If what you really want is just to connect the notebook to your network, check if it has a PC Card or PCMCIA slot. Most notebooks, even very old ones, should have that. Then you can find a second hand PCMCIA Ethernet card for almost nothing.


1

[EDIT] I found a post with instructions - I'm not sure how current that is. It looks like you use Puppy's own Internet Connection Wizard (launched by an icon labeled "connect"), which has an option "Internet by dialup analog or wireless modem". That shows PupDial, which can be used to establish a connection using your modem. Below is a description about how ...



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