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You can use pmap which shows the memory map of a process: pmap -p pid For more information about it see the man page man pmap or have a look at pmap(1): report memory map of process - Linux man page.


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Try: pidof bash | xargs ps -o rss,sz,vsz To find the memory usage of your current bash shell (assuming you're using bash). Change bash to whatever you're investigating. If you're after one specific process, simply use on it's own: ps -o rss,sz,vsz <process id> From the man page: RSS: resident set size, the non-swapped physical memory that a task ...


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Your swap area is highly undersized. A large part of the RAM reported to be free is in fact currently unusable because it serves as a backing store to other programs memory reservations. Just add some swap, it can be a simple file, and you'll be able to launch your JVM.


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You can have available RAM but still run out of swap. I believe this could be what you are experiencing. Investigate with swap -s. As a second idea the problem may be due to the fact that there isn't enough contiguous memory available although it would seem fairly odd if the OS cannot find 10 GB contiguous free memory when there seems to >100 GB free.


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As far as I know that's not possible. And I think it is a much more complicated problem to solve than it looks at first if we take the complexity of memory management into account. It may be even hard to clearly write down what it means to "set 50MB aside". But in Linux, there is something that may well solve your problem much more elegant: The OOM killer - ...


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Try with the following instead: java -Xms512m -Xmx512m -d64 HelloWorldApp or java -Xms1024m -Xmx1024m -d64 HelloWorldApp May also be because it is too high.


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Create a script something like checkmemory.sh and place the following code: #!/usr/bin/ksh #memory calculator um=`svmon -G | head -2|tail -1| awk {'print $3'}` um=`expr $um / 256` tm=`lsattr -El sys0 -a realmem | awk {'print $2'}` tm=`expr $tm / 1000` fm=`expr $tm - $um` echo "\n\n-----------------------"; echo "System : (`hostname`)"; echo ...


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With gawk, from its man page about arrays, you can read a details explanation. In most other languages, arrays must be declared before use, including a specification of how many elements or components they contain. In such languages, the declaration causes a contiguous block of memory to be allocated for that many elements. Usually, an index in the ...


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Per the gawk manual, which is a good general awk language reference: An important aspect to remember about arrays is that array subscripts are always strings. That is, awk arrays are always associative, and numeric keys are stringified. Only the keys that are in use are stored in the array (and maybe some extra space for the future). Numeric indices ...


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The manufacturer sold you the 2GB USB stick as 2 Gigabytes, meaning 2000000000 bytes. Your computer is showing the stick in units of Gigibytes. 1 Gigibyte is 1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes, which is 1073741824 bytes. If you divide your 2000000000 by 1073741824 you'll end up with 1.86264514923095703125 or, rounded to two decimal places 1.86 GiB. In other words, ...


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The difference is the space used by the file system. There is a space overhead for both metadata and the file system's internal structure. This is true of virtually all file systems whether they are Windows or Linux file systems. On linux, storage devices such as your ssd are treated as a block devices and there is a command 'dd' that will address entire ...


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On your question 2 (defragmenting memory), quoting from https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/sysctl/vm.txt : compact_memory Available only when CONFIG_COMPACTION is set. When 1 is written to the file, all zones are compacted such that free memory is available in contiguous blocks where possible. This can be important for example in the ...


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If you are using a LVM, you can allocate/create a new Logical Volume a format it as a swap space. lvcreate -n swap2 -L ##G VG_NAME mkswap /dev/VG_NAME/swap2 swapon -a


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Use badram kernel patch.. It allocate memory on certain address so it could not be used. http://rick.vanrein.org/linuxa/badram/ http://blog.eracc.com/2011/02/02/linux-with-badram-saves-the-day/ or badmem http://badmem.sourceforge.net/docu/BadMEM-HOWTO.html or turn of address after certain point http://gquigs.blogspot.com/2009/01/bad-memory-howto.html


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There are several reasons a piece of RAM would not be used by Linux: If Linux detects it as belonging to a hardware peripheral. Most computers need RAM for the display, and thus reserve some RAM for the graphics card. It's also possible for the graphics card to contain its own RAM; as graphics cards have relatively high memory requirements, they tend not ...


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In the vSphere client, hit "Edit Settings" on your virtual machine. Under the "Hardware" tab, select "Video card". You should see the video memory to the right. Mine default to 8MB.


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You can use Munin to monitor Postgres and other services. You can use monit to restart a service automatically when the load is too high.


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According to Henrik Stoerner at http://lists.xymon.com/oldarchive/2006/02/msg00115.html , real is the physical memory, actual is the amount of memory in use not including buffers and cache, all based on the output of the free command.


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Arch Linux' kernel has the swap accounting disabled by default (cf. the kernel config file). You can enable it by booting with swapaccount=1 in your kernel cmdline (cf. the kernels Kconfig documentation.


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The names actually match up, but sar and free don't show exactly the same fields. Your first ??? isn't kbcommit, it's shared memory, the same as Shmem from /proc/meminfo. The second row shows the memory usage if the memory used by buffers and cache was treated as free rather than used. $ free total used free shared buffers ...


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Actually, as your output perhaps demonstrates, sar's kbmemused is probably not the same as the second "Mem:" field from free. From man sar: kbmemused Amount of used memory in kilobytes. This does not take into account memory used by the kernel itself. Presuming that part of what's not taken into account is: ...



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