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1

The answer is no, in terms of free(1) type information. We simply do not do that type of accounting and then have the ability to report it back. The closest we have is 'bdinfo' (or bdi for short): > bdinfo ... DRAM bank = 0x00000000 -> start = 0x80000000 -> size = 0x40000000


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It is not clear if you search for page in/out caused by paging or by swapping. The difference is explained at several places here (http://superuser.com/questions/785447). The number of pages swapped and paged from /proc/vmstat. Pages paged in / out $ cat /proc/vmstat|grep pgpg pgpgin 6920262 pgpgout 345654122 Pages swapped in / out $ cat ...


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U-boot commands documentation is available here: http://www.denx.de/wiki/DULG/Manual The acutal set of commands depend on the built version/branch .


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with bash free and grep only read junk total used free shared buffers cached junk < <(free -m | grep ^Mem) echo $used


3

MM seems to be quite arcane, so it is indeed annoying to track down. Linux literature makes heavy mention of LRU in the context of MM (memory management). I haven't noticed any of the other terms being mentioned. If you're not familiar with how basic LRU is implemented in practice for virtual memory, I came across an interesting introduction (first four ...


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Your output shows that top is printing some escape sequences that the terminal doesn't recognize. The bits where you see a blank followed by [ followed by more garbage characters are escape sequences that work on most terminals; the first character of those sequences is the escape character, which your terminal prints as a blank. For example, ␛[7m at the ...


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From http://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/ps.html: vsz = "The size of the process in (virtual) memory in 1024 byte units as a decimal integer."


3

I don't think there is a way to limit swap space, unless you modify the program to only request non-swappable memory, which even if possible would probably be impractical. However what you can and should do is limit the total amount of memory available to the process. You can use cgroups (the new-ish general way), ulimit (setrlimit, the traditional way), or ...


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Below stuff may help : var=$(pgrep process_name_here); top -b -p "$var" | awk -v var=$var '$1~var{print $10}' You might even think of writing a script and passing the process name as argument Note: This solution will not work if you change the default layout for the top command. In that case you need to replace $10 with appropriate field number


1

The physmem value from the system_pages statistics will give you the number of pages the OS sees. You need to multiply this number by the default page size which can be 4K or 8K depending on your architecture: $ kstat -n system_pages -p -s physmem | nawk -v pagesize=$(pagesize) '{print $2*pagesize/1024/1024 "MB"}' 4017.64MB Note that this might not ...


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There's also lgrpinfo (man page): Description lgrpinfo prints information about the locality group (lgroup) hierarchy and its contents. An lgroup represents the set of CPU and memory-like hardware devices that are at most some distance (latency) apart from each other. All lgroups in the system are identified by a unique integer called an ...


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Cache. A good summary at http://www.linuxatemyram.com/. Linux is borrowing unused memory for disk caching. This makes it looks like you are low on memory, but you are not! Everything is fine! To clear the caches use this command, as root, and then observe resulting memory usage. echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches


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You might be able to use: echo "::memstat" |mdb -k


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Do you have either swap or mdb? Maybe kstat :::physmem, which should give you the number of pages. (8K on SPARC, 4K on x86 in most situations)


2

If you look at the kernel's inode source code, you can see that the ihash_entries is set at the kernel level only. There is no user or process level considerations at all. Adding those could drastically decrease performance which would be counter productive. It would also imply keeping track of all processes that used the cached entries, therefore ...


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I'm using the below script, which works great. It uses cgroups through cgmanager. Name this script limitmem and put it in your $PATH and you can use it like limitmem 100M bash. This will limit both memory and swap usage. To limit just memory remove the line with memory.memsw.limit_in_bytes. #!/bin/sh set -eu if [ "$#" -lt 2 ] then echo Usage: ...


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Digging up a really old question here - but I had this same issue. For me the problem ended up being MYSQLD running. To started I noticed my healthchecks started failing after switching to a t1-nano ubuntu instance in ec2 (1 core 512 ram). At the time I thought this would be fine b/c I was only running nginx with a static health check, a 301 entry and a ...



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