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11

It might help to up /proc/sys/vm/page-cluster (default: 3). From the kernel documentation (sysctl/vm.txt): page-cluster page-cluster controls the number of pages up to which consecutive pages are read in from swap in a single attempt. This is the swap counterpart to page cache readahead. The mentioned consecutivity is not in terms of ...


5

You may try adding the programs you most care about to a cgroup and tuning swappiness so that the next time the application runs the programs you add are less likely to be candidates for swapping. Some of their pages will likely still be swapped out but it may get around your performance problems. A large part of it is probably just the "stop and start" ...


4

It seems to me that you can't magically "make the system responsive again". You either incur the penalty or reading pages back from swap space into memory now or you incur it later, but one way or the other you incur it. Indeed, if you do something like swapoff -a && swapon -a then you may feel more pain rather than less, because you force some pages ...


3

valgrind will give you this information, along with a number of other statistics on memory use (and it will tell you about memory leaks etc.). It will slow the program down somewhat, but since yours is a short-lived process it shouldn't be an issue. Here's example output from running ls: ==7051== ==7051== HEAP SUMMARY: ==7051== in use at exit: 351,689 ...


2

MemTotal: Total usable RAM in kilobytes (i.e. physical memory minus a few reserved bytes and the kernel binary code) Source: Torvalds linux github repro (linux/Documentation/filesystems/proc.txt) Check BIOS reserved memory: dmesg | grep BIOS | grep reserved


1

'Used' is real-time (or at least, close to it). It's important to note that the value for 'used' on the first line includes buffered and cached memory, and that even the value for 'used' on the second line includes file-backed (i.e. non-anonymous) pages that can be dropped without swapping if needed. Generally, these numbers should (roughly) match what you ...


1

I believe the issue to be related to a Windows mount request gone bad. When the Unix forked process gets the message back from Windows, there appears to be a fumble of sorts. This dominoes into other realms where resource "A" is requested directly or indirectly. I've seen it most recently with respect to VM related events.


1

Can only answer the third question partly, although there is no current documentation on this topic since the switch to 64 bit kernels that I'm aware of. See Inter-Process Communication (IPC) Limits in the Programming section of the AIX 5.3 documentation. You may find something more current in the PDFs in the section Programming for AIX under AIX PDFs, ...



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