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4

That goes back to tele-typewriters (ttys!) in the 70s. Sending X<backspace>X (^H being the ASCII BS character) to a tele-typewriter, causes it to write X, go back one character and write X again on top of itself. It being written twice makes it appear as bold. Similarly, for underline, you'd write _<backspace>X which would write X on top of an ...


-2

$ man -K "fopen" gives you the output /usr/share/man/en/man3/fclose.3.gz? [ynq] y to open/display man page n to continue search q to Quit search


2

Use the global apropos option in man. -K, --global-apropos Search for text in all manual pages. This is a brute-force search, and is likely to take some time; if you can, you should specify a section to reduce the number of pages that need to be searched. Search terms may be simple strings (the default), or regular expressions if the ...


5

From man man: -K, --global-apropos Search for text in all manual pages. This is a brute-force search, and is likely to take some time; if you can, you should specify a section to reduce the number of pages that need to be searched. Search terms may be simple strings (the default), or regular expressions if the --regex ...


3

On a GNU system, the program you're looking for is man. BROWSER=firefox man --html man Try that command (or substitute some other valid value for BROWSER=, such as, for example, cat with a redirect if you wish to save the result) and see what you get. If you want it to be the default configuration, you'll find instructions for configuring man to your ...


2

I have no idea why you would want to do this, it seems far simpler to just keep a terminal window open, but you can create HTML versions of all your manuals like this (assuming the names of the directories where your manuals are stored contain no whitespace): Install man2html sudo apt-get install man2html Create the directory where you will keep the HTML ...


0

Putting together the pieces from the other discussion here here's a quick function you can leave in your .bashrc that will get you directly to the built-in (if it exists). Otherwise it opens man as normal: man() { case "$(/bin/bash -c 'type -t '"$1")" in builtin) LESS=+?"^ $1 " command -p man bash ;; *) ...


4

There is xman, a graphical utility for displaying manpages. I don't know anyone who has ever used it though. It was old an archaic already 20 years ago. For your stated use case of having manual pages displayed all the time, you'd probably be better off just opening a new terminal window and typing man something than by using xman.


2

You can use man2html(this is how the package is usually called), an example. man 1 man | man2html > man.html And then use firefox, elinks or whatever browser you want to view it. There are also some services that keep manpages such as http://manpages.ubuntu.com/


0

The manual page gives 3 reasons. Note that ftime(3), profil(3), and ulimit(3) are implemented as library functions. Some system calls, like alloc_hugepages(2), free_hugepages(2), ioperm(2), iopl(2), and vm86(2) exist only on certain architectures. Some system calls, like ipc(2), create_module(2), init_module(2), and delete_module(2) ...


0

> I am looking for help interpreting a man page to understand complicated commands. I think that's the misunderstanding here. What makes Linux/UNIX so powerful is that you can construct very long and effective commands by e.g. redirecting the stdout of one command (here, locate) to the stdin of another (here, xargs) through a pipe (|). Hence, as Random832 ...


2

Most of them used to be implemented at some point in Linux kernel history time, but some like at least vserver are still implemented in specific kernels. The majority of these calls is now essentially obsolete but their slot remains and contains a stub which role is not to break old code and allow a re-implementation in a specialized or new kernel should it ...


3

If you just want to concatenate all installed man pages into a single file, you could do: cat /usr/share/man/man?/*gz > all.gz You should also include any/all dirs that can be found in the environment variable $MANPATH or which can be found in the output of the command manpath. You can then read the concatenated manpages as a single file by running ...


3

Adding on to the great answers already given: 1) If you're interested in a gnu utility, especially ones like sed and grep, sometimes, using the info command will bring up a greatly expanded version of the command information. sed, for instance, has a detailed section on how to write regular expressions and another section with some very complex usage ...


2

To get a quick help with your specific command, you can use Explain Shell. E.g. your command. After getting the first high-level understanding how this works, you should proceed with manpages as other answers recommend.


8

One key thing to remember is that you cannot only look at the manual for one command, in the case of commands that execute other commands. For your example command locate something | xargs -I {} bash -c "if [ -d "{}" ]; then echo {}; fi" You need information on not only xargs but also bash and [ (this may be in the test manpage). You may also need ...


55

Well, this is my very personal way to read manpages: Have in mind what you want to do. When doing your research about xargs you did it for a purpouse, right? You had a specific need that was reading standard output and executing commands based on that output. On the following steps I'll take find as an example. Let's just pretend that we know nothing about ...


28

This is quite nicely explained in man man: The following conventions apply to the SYNOPSIS section and can be used as a guide in other sections. bold text type exactly as shown. italic text replace with appropriate argument. [-abc] any or all arguments within [ ] are optional. -a|-b options ...


12

man pages normally are displayed with less nowadays. That makes it possible to search through them. I would not bother with the synopsis, especially not because you have a particular commandline that you want to understand. Hit the / and start typing -I and then Enter. The first hit will be in the synopsis, the second (use n for next) gets you the detailed ...


14

Some basics to understand synopsis each [foo] represent optional argument or parameter. when [foo [ bar ] ] syntax is used, you may use foo, and you may add bar. mandatory option parameter are used this way [ -S size ] , which tell that -S argument is waiting for a mandatory size. For instance : foo [-S size ] filename ... means command is foo ...



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