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The Docker image is extremely stripped down. I believe they remove the man pages after the RPMs are installed. You can verify this with rpm -V shadow-utils. I know I've had problems trying to use delta RPMs to upgrade packages because the man pages are missing. Sadly, I think the only way to get a man page for something would be to force reinstall the RPM ...


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You have two options here. 1. You can set the MANLESS environment variable to what ever you need: export MANLESS=" " 2. You can add the -r option to your man command: man -r="" ls Both possibilities are described in the man manual page.


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at -b is supposed to be equivalent to batch, but there's a bug: b isn't declared in the list of valid options, so getopt() reports an error and -b isn't actually processed. If you add b to the list of options, then it's handled correctly and at -b becomes equivalent to batch.


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-b is an alias for batch. The alias command makes it possible to launch any command or group of commands (inclusive of any options, arguments and redirection) by entering a pre-set string (i.e., sequence of characters). That is, it allows a user to create simple names or abbreviations (even consisting of just a single character) for commands regardless of ...


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With the man from man-db at least: $ man -f open open (2) - open and possibly create a file open (1) - start a program on a new virtual terminal (VT). open (3tcl) - Open a file-based or command pipeline channel open (3perl) - perl pragma to set default PerlIO layers for input and output Same as: $ whatis open open ...


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I use my package manager to do this kind of stuff. On Archlinux: pacman -Ql gedit | grep /man/ RH/Fedora: dnf repoquery -l gedit | grep /man/ Debian/Ubuntu/... dpkg-query -L gedit | grep /man/


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If you're man is from the "man-db" package, you can invoke this to see the "intro" page for each section of the manual: man -a intro If you know the location of the man pages database, this will list all of the section directories (man1, man2, man3, etc): (cd /usr/share/man; ls -d man*) Also if using man from the man-db package, you can see the ...


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The following command should list all available man page sections for a given command: find /usr/share/man -name "<command>.*.gz" | egrep -o '[0-9]' | sort -u


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One option: apropos fork to limit to exact word: apropos -e fork Alternatively, as apropos uses regex by default: apropos "^fork$" Alternatively use man -k instead of apropos. Check out man pages for apropos and man for more details.



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