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As explained in the beginning of that paragraph in that man page, '-' character, when put between two characters, represents a range of characters, and also, '-' character, when put as first or last character between brackets, has its literal meaning. So, the first dash really means a '-' character, and the second dash is a range specifier. So the whole ...


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Google is often the quickest way. However, if you want to search man pages, you can use the following to list (-w) all man pages of user commands (section 1) containing the text .bashrc anywhere: man -w -s 1 -K .bashrc For a file like .bashrc, this will turn up a few false positives in the form of man pages that suggest adding an alias or other setting to ...


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I recommend @akrafs answer, but if that is not detailed enough; you can set up auditd to log which file accessed the configuration file. More details in : http://www.la-samhna.de/library/audit.html


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If you have a package manager, you can query, which package owns a given file. On Arch Linux, you can use pacman -Qo FILENAME On Ubuntu, Debian and other distributions with apt, you can use apt-file FILENAME To search man files, you can use zgrep cd /usr/share/man find -name *.gz | \ # List all *.gz files while read line; do # For each ...


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man usually has an example section, but it can be time consuming to find exactly what you are looking for sometimes. I have found this site very helpful when I just need a quick example to get going. It has an extensive list of Unix commands with man-like documentation, but with really useful examples. Examples: grep unzip sed


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Ony my Linux systems, man 1 man mentions the MANWIDTH environment variable, which, now that I look it up, is also specified in the FreeBSD man(1) manpage: MANWIDTH If set to a numeric value, used as the width manpages should be displayed. Otherwise, if set to a special value ``tty'', and output is to a terminal, the pages may ...


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I don't think it'd be common to interpret tool -f BAR | --foo BAR as «pipe the output of tool -f BAR into the command --foo BAR». So I'd use simply tool -f BAR | --foo BAR There's other possibilities in the wild using additional markup, specially if the invocation is more complex, to make it more obvious. Unlike with optional arguments and [] though, none ...


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Doing a man man shows you what the -k switch does to man. Using the -k switch man -k printf Search the short descriptions and manual page names for the keyword printf as regular expression. Print out any matches. Equivalent to apropos -r printf. The tool, apropos mentioned above, searches through index files, looking at both the ...



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