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Alternative for Debian/Ubuntu/Mint... $ cd /var/lib/dpkg/info && grep -c '^/usr/share/man/.*/' *.list | sort -t: -k2rn | less -XF Gives for me: manpages-dev.list:1962 libssl-doc.list:1171 tcl8.6-doc.list:813 perl-doc.list:719 libdatetime-locale-perl.list:470 tcllib.list:407


3

On my gentoo box command qfile /usr/share/man/*/* | awk '{print $1}' | sort | uniq -c | sort -n gives 864 sys-libs/ncurses 1139 sys-apps/man-pages-posix 1283 dev-libs/openssl 2209 sys-apps/man-pages 2246 x11-libs/libxcb But after including all subdirectories with a little help of ** pattern qfile /usr/share/man/**/* | awk '{print $1}' ...


4

For Debian-based systems, to get the package with the most installed man pages: dpkg -S '/usr/share/man/*.gz' | cut -d: -f1 | sort | uniq -c | sort -rn | head -1 | awk '{print $2}' To get the package with the most available man pages (whether installed or not): apt-file search /usr/share/man | cut -d: -f1 | uniq -c | sort -rn | head -1 | awk '{print $2}' ...


2

This solution worked on CentOS and RHEL machines. rpm -qf $(man -w $(compgen -ac)) | sort | uniq -c | sort -nr | head -1 I can generate the list of all the commands that are available in the system using compgen -ac. Now, man -w can tell the corresponding man page of this command. I give this man page as input to rpm -qf which will give me the package ...


1

In the "good old days", man pages were printed and came with the mainframe/mini computers (took all of them home to read at one point). They came in volumes organized by usage: command, system command, library call, system call, file format, etc. The man(1) page shows the volume names. To view a page from a specific volume, you would put that on the ...


3

The number is a "section" there are several sections. Usually 1 is General command 2 is System calls 3 is functions (for example in C) 4 is Special Files 5 is File Formats (think config files) 6 is misc. 7 is system commands The reason is that a "term" may be in many sections. ftp is a command, could be a daemon and might have a config file. So ...


0

Download the kernel source code and in the source dir execute make mandocs After the man documents have been made, execute make installmandocs This will install the manual pages into /usr/local/man/man9/. Now you can view man pages by typing man <api-name>, or if you are editing in vim just press K over the API name.



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