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From this link titled: Subject: Re: omitting duplicates in apropos and apropos-list - msg#00017, I found the information below. "Because a symbol might be available by way of more than one inheritance path, apropos might print information about the same symbol more than once, or apropos-list might return a list containing duplicate symbols." I ...


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Man` is calling Less; the only control at the man level is choosing which options to call Less with. Less's search case-sensitivity is controlled by two options. If -I is in effect, then searches are case-insensitive: either a or A can be used to match both a and A. If -i is in effect but not -I, then searches are case-insensitive, but only if the pattern ...


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groff -man -Tascii < /path/to/manpage/without/gz | less EG: groff -man -Tascii < C:/Programs/msysgit/mingw/man/man1/gcc.1 | less Note: Although switching shells is not needed here, mysysgit uses sh (not bash) as the default shell. Thanks to devnull for pointing thatr out.


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"Is there anyway to force lowercase x to match only lowercase x when using man?" Here's one way man -Tascii manpage |less I don't know the gory details, but the roff processing is performing markup and the pager seems to be matching the un-marked up text, even though it is displaying the marked up text. Very confusing, hopefully an nroff guru can explain ...


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This is how less's -i (command line switch) "case insensitive" mode works (i.e., it is still sensitive for upper case). As Gilles points out, using this is compiled into man-db. In addition to the ways indicated in Gilles answer WRT setting an alias +-i or a custom MANLESS, you can toggle strict case matching once the man page opens up with -i (which turns ...


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You can use the -w switch to man to see where man pages are being loaded from on disk. Example $ man -w lsof /usr/share/man/man8/lsof.8.gz So you could locate man pages for software that's similar to this and add the man page you want locally on the system to this same directory. I did also dig this up, titled: Chef Gem Man Pages, which shows man pages ...


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tail -0 is a historical, deprecated way of writing tail -n 0, i.e. print the last 0 lines of the file. (So tail -0 doesn't produce any output.) I don't know of any tail implementation that has a -a option. From context, it looks like -f was meant. tail -f makes tail keep the file open when it reaches the end, and keep watching forever in case some other ...


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The -0 means 0 lines, in other words, don't print any existing stuff. None of the tail man pages mention a -a option. Perhaps they meant -f or -F, which would print any new contents written after tail started. References: Mac OS X tail man page FreeBSD tail man page GNU tail info docs Solaris tail man page



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