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8

To answer your question with at least a hint of factual background I propose to start by looking at the timeline of creation of man, info and other documentation systems. The first man page was written in 1971 using troff (nroff was not around yet) in a time when working on a CRT based terminal was not common and printing of manual pages the norm. The man ...


1

Most of packages that doesn't comes with their man pages in the binary packages (in Debian based distros), instead use a package with the -doc suffix. In the case of OpenJDK, depending the version it could be openjdk-8-doc or openjdk-7-doc. If you install the default-jdk or default-jre metapackage, you can use the default-jdk-doc to use the default ...


2

An alternative to the methods provided by @Renan and @jimmij yields wireshark-filter the big winner on my system. for i in {1..9}; do du -sh man"$i"/*.gz | grep -v "^..0K" | grep -v "^0\|^12K\|^16K\|^[0-9][0-9]K" ; done Based on that I did a opened each of the largest entries with man and checked the number of lines at the end of the file with a :f and ...


8

You can calculate it yourself for your system with simple command $ find /usr/share/man/ -type f -exec ls -S {} + 2>/dev/null | head | while \ read -r file; do printf "%-40s" "$file"; \ man "$file" 2>/dev/null | wc -lwm; done | sort -nrk 4 which returns on my box (file) (lines) (words) (chars) ...


3

Man pages are stored in /usr/share/man/manX where X is the section (described in man man). They're compressed in gzip format, so let's assume a larger compressed file means a bigger manpage. By checking in /usr/share/man/man1 (section 1: Executable programs or shell commands) with the command gzip -l *.gz | sort -n -k2, I get this (which will probably vary ...


1

help is a built-in command in the bash shell (and that shell only) that documents some of the builtin commands and keywords of that shell. That's an internal documentation system of that shell. Other shells have their own documentation system (ksh93 has --help and --man options for its builtins, zsh has a run-help helper that extracts information from ...


0

If you want to easily print a man doc I usually do it the graphical way: man -Hfirefox command Then you can print certain pages in your web browser. This isn't as powerful as doing it through the command line but it's a lot easier to get right since you can actually see what you're printing ahead of time. This may be important if you want to print a ...


2

There doesn't seem to be a manpage for the interfaces config files in RHEL but the documentation can be found in: /usr/share/doc/initscripts-*/sysconfig.txt Look for the sections describing files /etc/sysconfig/network and /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-<interface-name> Also in your example the command whatis ifcfg returns ifcfg (8) - ...


2

Convert it to html. You will have table of contents with links: bunzip2 -c $(man -w bash) | groff -mandoc -Thtml > /tmp/bash.html && \ firefox -remote "openURL(file:///tmp/bash.html, new-tab)" You can create a function which will do it automatically for all man pages if you like.


3

If you just want the section headings, grep for them. They are in ALLCAPS and are the only lines that have no leading spaces: $ man bash | grep '^[A-Z]' BASH(1) General Commands Manual BASH(1) NAME SYNOPSIS COPYRIGHT DESCRIPTION OPTIONS ARGUMENTS INVOCATION DEFINITIONS RESERVED WORDS ...


0

Assuming you haven't changed your pager, you will be viewing man pages in less. To search in less, type /regex, e.g. /^SHELL BUILTIN COMMANDS, then press enter. Use n/N to navigate between multiple matches.


7

I wrote a small script to do this called he, e.g. he apt-get autoclean. The basic strategy is: search for the word (e.g. autoclean) as the first word on a line, then print until the next blank line. You can get something similar using basic sed, e.g. man apt-get | sed -ne '/^ *autoclean/,/^$/p' You can find the script on my github page (linked above) ...


2

Type: man 2 chmod, or man -a chmod to get all the versions. Note: man -a chmod may be useful on some systems, because there may be other man pages on the same function, which may give additional information. For instance, under Debian, if the manpages-posix-dev package is installed, there's also the chmod(3posix) man page, also accessible via man 3 chmod.



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