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1

Here you are: ifconfig -a | grep -e "inet [0-9]" | cut -d" " -f 2 Most of the given answers won't work well on Mac OS X! The easiest thing you can do, is using cut or awk.


0

I was having a similar problem for a couple of weeks (Debian 8 Jessie, Macbook Pro July 2012). Every time I hit / held a key down, the mouse would stutter across the screen, even as everything else ran at a normal speed. I was examining this in the code of a game I'm writing, so I could see the nature of mouse input changing as a key was held - those values ...


1

Use ip addr show with -o flag. For instance, here's all IPv4 addresses of my connected interfaces $ ip -4 -o addr show | awk '{print $4}' 127.0.0.1/8 10.42.0.1/24 192.168.0.78/24 10.0.3.1/24 Getting only specific addresses that start with 10. like you have can be done this ...


1

To get all inet IP: ifconfig -a | grep -oP 'inet \K\S+' In order to get just 10.16 family: ifconfig -a | grep -oP 'inet \K10\.16\S+'


1

tmux (like GNU screen) works by translating the features of your actual terminal into an (often different) internal terminal. They do this to allow you to connect a session on different terminals at the same time, or at different times. When that works well, you will see the "same" text no matter where you are connecting from. Not all terminals support ...


0

If you are one of the unfortunate people like me that could not get xmodmap to switch right Alt with right Ctrl, then maybe this will help. If you press right Alt and e and you get é then this solution is for you (needs improvement). Run this in the terminal (check your keycodes with xev): xmodmap -e "keycode 108 = Alt_R Meta_R Alt_R Meta_R" then put ...


7

Well, if you know your IP starts with 10.16, it's trivial: ifconfig -a | grep -oP '\b10\.16\.[0-9.]+\b' Or, if your grep doesn't support -P or -o: ifconfig -a | awk '/10\.16\./ && /inet/{print $2}' If not, you could find all lines starting with inet and print their second field: ifconfig -a | awk '$1=="inet"{print $2}' That, however, would ...


0

You could use a perl-command like perl -ne '$_=~/inet\s(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)\s/; print $1,"\n"' This uses a regex to find the IP after inet and prints it. Just pipe your output through it. Example: ifconfig -a | grep 10.16 | perl -ne '$_=~/inet\s(\d+\.\d+\.\d+\.\d+)\s/; print $1,"\n"'


1

Use unetbootin : https://unetbootin.github.io/. Here is a tutorial for ubuntu but you can also use it for debian just change the image :http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/create-a-usb-stick-on-mac-osx


1

First use DD to make the usb bootable with kali. Then use gparted and use the remaining to create the other partitions on your device. Then, you should put boot flag on the partition with kali.


2

The problem is that the redirection with < is being done locally when you run ssh on its own (by the shell you are typing into), but being done on the remote machine when you run from expect, because spawn simply copies the arguments you provide, so the < is passed to the remote as part of the ssh command. It is as if you typed 'ssh' 'xxxx@yyyy' "sh -" ...



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