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8

Edit ~/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml with your favorite text editor and then, within the existing <keyboard> element, add the following lines: <keybind key="Print"> <action name="Execute"> <command>scrot</command> </action> </keybind> Use the openbox --reconfigure command to use the new settings. ...


8

But shouldn't it have been sourced during the graphical login? There's a minor debate about that on which some graphical logins take an unusual stance... I add $HOME/bin to $PATH from ~/.profile. However, it seems it is not sourced during login. I use a login manager - lxdm I think Correct. Most DM's do read ~/.profile when you log in. However, ...


7

Openbox will give the functionality you are looking for to windows whose _OB_APP_TYPE property is set to "desktop" (You can use obxprop to check the properties of a window). So we need to set the _OB_APP_TYPE for your terminator window to "desktop" so that this will happen. Reading through the openbox source code, in client.c I could see that _OB_APP_TYPE ...


6

I doubt that LXDE vs GNOME will make a significant difference, but I don't have hard figures. I doubt less that the default configuration of LXDE and the default configuration of GNOME will make some difference. To keep power consumption down, turn off desktop effects (animations, anything 3D). Make sure you're not running any kind of “screen saver”. Most ...


6

On LXDE ~/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml config is used instead. To check how openbox was started you can do: $ ps ax | grep openbox 2109 ? S 0:29 openbox --config-file /home/marcin/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml


5

I don't have Lubuntu installed to test but maybe: To configuration file ~/.config/openbox/lubuntu-rc.xml adding the lines below : <!-- Option to maximize all normal window when launched--> <application type="normal"> <maximized>true</maximized> </application> Removal of this was suggested as a way to STOP it from doing so ...


5

First a couple of terms which will help you to understand this issue in particular and other things in general WRT a linux GUI: Window Manager (WM) Desktop Environment (DE) Someone should really write a simple, canonical explanation of these in a linux context...anyway, the base windowing system generally used on *nix systems (including linux) is the ...


4

Short answer: aptitude install lxde xorg will do. Longer answer: The aptitude show command will show you a description of a package and its dependencies from the command line, so you can use that to decide whether to install the package or not. Keep in mind that aptitude and apt-get have automated dependency resolution, so package lxde will install ...


4

Right click on an existing application shortcut in the panel and you will get a context menu with "Application Launch Bar Settings" at the top, this is what you want. If you do not have any existing shortcuts preset... I do not know.


4

Two things to check for: Port 6000 needs to be open on the 222 machine (configure or disable the firewall), and the X server itself needs to be listening on that port. This is often disabled in modern distros. Check if it's listening with # netstat -nltp | grep 6000 tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:6000 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 10818/Xorg ...


4

Apparently, it was the entry in ~/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml. Logging out and back in wasn't enough for some reason, but I rebooted and now my F11 key is back in action.


4

The applet for the Battery Monitor plugin does not use a simple icon. It draws a 2D vector graphic using the Cairo library. You can only edit the panel item's appearance within the limits provided by the plugin, which does not currently include an option for replacing it with an icon. It's normal that themes do not affect this panel item's appearance ...


4

There is no option to change the appearance for the active window in lxpanel's Task Bar (Window List) plugin. You can patch the lxpanel source file launchtaskbar.c in the most recent version, LX Panel 0.7.1. - LXDE - Lightweight X Desktop Environment - Browse /LXPanel (desktop panel) at SourceForge.net For example, you could make the active window use bold ...


4

Your notification daemon has probably not been started. Try to start it by hand with: /usr/lib/notification-daemon/notification-daemon If you have a properly started daemon, you might have hit this bug, which causes the daemon to crash.


4

That icon has nothing, nothing to do with libnotify, nor dbus. This is entirely dependent of your DM/WM (I'm guessing cinnamon, but could be wrong) and dbus/libnotify can't do anything to control it. For comparison: XFCE doesn't use such icon, and I'm aware that GNOME Shell does show a icon independently what method you use. If you need to get rid of the ...


4

AFAICT, you are right in attributing the system tray icon to notification-daemon. If you are not happy with the icon, try another notification daemon. Notifications work on the basis of client server. Any notification client can communicate with any compatible server. I myself am using dunst and I am very happy with that. It does not have any system tray ...


3

you could try the jupiter applet, its a power management applet for laptops and netbooks, very very handy to get longer battery life,i use it in ubuntu, but its also meant to be supported in Fedora 14, have a look here http://www.fewt.com/2011/01/jupiter-applet-gets-its-own-home.html


3

That's an lxterminal bug. It doesn't show in other shells because zsh is nice enough to try and show you hidden characters showed by the previous command when you don't include a trailing newline before issuing a prompt. If you type echo -n foo, you'll see foo%. The % indicates that there was no newline character. Above, what happens is that lxterminal ...


3

In the file .config/lxpanel/LXDE/panels/panel you can find the following stanza: Plugin { type = menu Config { image=/usr/share/lxde/images/lxde-icon.png system { } separator { } item { command=run } separator { } item { image=gnome-logout ...


3

As warl0ck noted, LXDE uses openbox as the WM, so you may just have a problem in your configuration settings. Hopefully these LXDE file locations should get you back on course: The config files of LXPanel are stored in ~/.config/lxpanel/. Under LXDE, we use a different profile name - LXDE. So it's in ~/.config/lxpanel/LXDE. In this way, if you changed the ...


3

Though this is a bad idea yes it is possible. The fastest method would be to do a Ctl+Alt+F1 and login as root. If there is no root password then login as a regular user and do the sudo su. After that you can use top to find and kill the xserver. Lastly run startx which should put you at a graphical desktop. This is a very bad idea. If you need to run ...


3

It looks to me, on fedora 19 at least, that root login in LXDE is prevented by a pam configuration. The file /etc/pam.d/lxde contains the line auth required pam_succeed_if.so user != root quiet Which clearly indicates that the root user is silently refused to log in. Commenting out this line immediately causes lxdm to allow root to log in.


3

A disadvantage to twm is that it does not appear to implement extended window manager hints (EWMH). This is not necessary to running contemporary apps, but many of them may exploit this (and I believe the GTK and Qt libraries may, also) -- for example "fullscreen mode" will require this in many cases, and apps that arrange themselves in particular ways ...


3

It turned out that lightdm (the login manager LXDE now uses) does not source ~/.profile. What worked for me was creating ~/.xsessionrc: if [ -d $HOME/bin ]; then export PATH="$HOME/bin:$PATH" fi You can also add this to /etc/X11/Xsession.d/90userbinpath if you want all user to benefit from this (each user would benefit for his own path) with a ...


3

Thunderbird, as a GTK+ application, supports a --class command-line option that sets the WM_CLASS property: $thunderbird --class TEST & $obxprop | grep 'OB_APP' _OB_APP_TYPE(UTF8_STRING) = "normal" _OB_APP_TITLE(UTF8_STRING) = "Mozilla Thunderbird" _OB_APP_GROUP_CLASS(UTF8_STRING) = "TEST" _OB_APP_GROUP_NAME(UTF8_STRING) = "thunderbird" ...


3

X11 is already on your computer X11 should already be installed on your system. Basically all Linux distros use it. LXDE runs on top of Xorg. Wayland is becoming the popular alternative to X Windows, but is still buggy. I'd wait to switch to it. So, what I'm saying is that you are already using X11. If not, I'd be extremely confused. What you want ...


3

Yes, something like it currently exists, but it is not the same resize grip in the corner that is used in gtk themes. Something like that would need to be coded into openbox. Add a Handle In your themerc for the theme you are using, you can set window.handle.width to a number of pixels and handle will appear below the window1. The handle includes diagonal ...


2

Apparently LXDE doesn't have a proper session manager. However as you've mentioned we can use the autostart file. All we need to do is create a dynamic list of the programs we are running before we exit the desktop. Here is a little bash script I whipped up that will parse the children of the root X11 window looking for apps to add to the autostart file. ...


2

You will need to edit the LXDE menu file, which should be something like: ~/.config/openbox/lxde-rc.xml and add something like: <keybind key="Super_L"> <action name="ShowMenu"> <menu>root-menu</menu> </action> </keybind>



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