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OK, I found myself in exactly the same position. It seems CentOS creates a small root volume by default and fills the remainder of your space with /home. I even tested my setup first in a VM but with the smaller disk CentOS didn't create the home volume. I picked up on this problem before becoming space constrained tho' and also figured how not to have to ...


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With your example disk sizes (2 x 3TB, 1 x 2TB, 1 x 1TB) this should work out well with btrfs raid5, with exactly 2/3 of the space being available for use, and with enough parity to lose any one drive. No partitioning is necessary, just give btrfs all of the devices directly. You can use the btrfs space allocator website to experiment with different ...


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You do not need to create a partition table on a disk (neither the traditional kind created with fdisk nor the GPT kind created with, e.g. gdisk), you could make the whole block device into an LVM PV if you wanted to. However, other tools or other operating systems might accidentally mistake that device for an unformatted hard disk and offer to format it, so ...


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As derobert suggested, I'm now using LVM's thin snapshots: # create pool lvcreate -L 10000M -T vg_oktestapp1/pool # create thin vol lvcreate -V 10000M -T vg_oktestapp1/pool -n lv_ibm # mount mkfs.ext4 /dev/vg_oktestapp1/lv_ibm mount /dev/vg_oktestapp1/lv_ibm /media/ibm # do stuff ... # create snapshot lvcreate -s vg_oktestapp1/lv_ibm --name ...


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Yes it can provide space for several VGs, e.g. by partitioning the drive and allocating the different partitions to different VGs. I am not sure if there is an advantage, it seems to me less flexible with allocating and moving space from one Logical Volume to anohter than if you have one VG with multiple LVs.


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I've now distilled enough information to answer my own question. Here are my steps for other people to follow. Usual disclaimer: Modifying existing filesystems and their underlying devices may cause corruption and loss of a data. Plan ahead, backup your data :-) If you follow these steps, parts of the filesystem layout I started with may not be applicable ...


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Yes, something has to run the LVM utility (as you say, vgchange -a y or similar) at some point. There is no magic that makes the kernel figure that one out by itself. In Initramfs this is usually done by the /init script (directly or indirectly). Some systems also scan for VG/LV whenever udev gets told of a new disk, but with devtmpfs you don't have that ...


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These are all the steps required to resize a LVM or LVM2 partition - sudo lvresize --verbose --resizefs -L -150G /dev/ubuntu/root sudo pvresize --setphysicalvolumesize {any size here} /dev/sda5 /dev/sda5: cannot resize to xxxxx extents as later ones are allocated. You have to rearrange the unallocated space at the end of the LVM. That means after root ...


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If you don't mind rebooting, you can try Acronis True Image. It does cost money though, and I've had several experiences where it failed to create an image. You can use dd and gzip to create an image. It's actually quite fast, and gzip usually does a good job of keeping the image relatively small. dd if=/dev/sdX conv=sync,noerror bs=64K | pv | gzip -c ...


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They're space-consuming. If you write 10% to a logical volume and then take a snapshot, the other 90% of that volume become unusable. Uh, no it isn't. The LVM snapshot presents two block devices, the origin LV (what you're snapshotting) and the snapshot LV. Only data that changes on either LV is actually written to the snapshot LV. You can mount the ...


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To complete @Lambert's answer, there is also Btrfs (a linux file system) which allows to create and restore snapshots of subvolume of the file system. For differences between the two read this post on reddit. Btrfs is included into the linux kernel, and you can use it a you root filesystem. It seems possible to boot on it. Regarding to its "experimental" ...


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You might have a look at the ZFS Fuse or ZFS on Linux project. The ZFS filesystem is capable of making snapshots and clones. I don't think it is possible to boot from ZFS for Linux but you might store your data/work within a ZFS pool. See also: http://zfsonlinux.org/ or search the Net for ZFS Fuse


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I would use lvmcache(7) which utilizes dm-cache. Nice writeup here on doing so: https://rwmj.wordpress.com/2014/05/22/using-lvms-new-cache-feature/ This, according to the author, requires the use of a single volume group. Thus you'll need to merge your volume groups. See following link which uses vgmerge(8) to do so: ...


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I'm a fan of LVM but I don't think it is required in this case - if all you want to do is to expand your sda1 filesystem to use the rest of the space on this drive. Assuming you don't at the moment have any data on your sda3, a better strategy is: with fdisk it is hard to work out the actual sizes of the partitions, use swapon -s to show the size of your ...


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First, you can't extend /dev/sda1 to include /dev/sda3 as their space allocations are NOT contiguous. You'd have to dump everything, re-layout the partitioning, and restore. Second, /dev/sda1 does not to appear to be an LVM partition. Even if you wanted to add the apparently unclaimed physical volume created in /dev/sda3, this would not be possible. ...



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