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In my case, I have the same problem. After some searching, someone talk about the nfs service which for file sharing. so in This case just need to restart the nfs service and then try to remove the logical volume disk: service nfs-kernel-server restart lvremove -f /dev/vg_service1/lv_home


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If I understand you right, you want to make one virtual HDD out for more HDD's of different size. Then it is a JBOD, not a RAID-0! So you can not use the stripe set settings, like you would with two disks of the same size. Say, gstripe. Instead you use a concatenated disk driver. Available under http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinum_volume_manager in Freebsd. ...


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If this is your objective, you can create the logical volume and specify the extents for its placement: lvcreate -l 100 -n lvol1 vg01 /dev/sdb1:900-999 In this example, you would be creating a 100-extend logical volume named 'lvol1' on 'vg01', using the physical volume 'sdb1', extents 900 through 999. In the case of existing logical volumes, if you have ...


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Physical extents in LVM have no relationship to the sizes of files stored within a logical volume. A file in a logical volume does not take a minimum of 4MB (or whatever the LV's chunk size is). As far as the filesystem is concerned, a logical volume is no different from any other block device (such as an ordinary disk partition). LVM chunks define how ...


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LVM and RAID only serve to present a block device to the operating system just like any other disk or partition. In other words they are on the same level as a partition as far as filesystems are concerned. Whether LVM divides the available space up in 4MB blocks or whatever is not relevant. The filesystem you create on top of that LVM device does not care ...


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I think the key to find out whether it is a LVM-over-LUKS, or the other way around, is the order of crypt and lvm TYPEs in the output of lsblk command. Based on that reasoning, I conclude my setup is a LUKS-over-LVM. For the lsblk output for a LVM-over-LUKS type of setup, look at output showed by @frostschultz below. In my case, since /dev/sda3 is a "Linux ...


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cryptsetup luksDump /dev/fedora/01 shows the LVM logical volume to be a LUKS encrypted volume. The output of pvs or pvdisplay would show the partition /dev/sda3 to be a physical volume. Thus you have LUKS over LVM. At a lower level, you have LVM over PC partition. The output of lsblk confirms this: sda is a disk, sda3 is a partition (which contains an LVM ...


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It's very odd to have a LUKS inside a plain crypt. Why encrypt twice? Once your filesystems are mounted, lsblk will show you what's what. NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 59.6G 0 disk └─sda1 8:1 0 59.6G 0 part └─md0 9:0 0 ...


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You can see what you have like so: $ sudo blkid | grep crypto_LUKS /dev/mapper/fedora-home: UUID="XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX" TYPE="crypto_LUKS" That's a LVM logical volume with crypto LUKS on it. When I mount that volume it's mounted like this under Fedora 20: $ mount | grep home /dev/mapper/luks-XXXXX on /home type ext4 (rw,relatime,seclabel,data=ordered) If ...


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for the resize2fs bit, it's like this: e2fsck -f /dev/myvg/lvtest resize2fs /dev/myvg/lvtest 96M #always a bit smaller than the LV ### then the rest as above lvresize -l 100M /dev/myvg/lvtest vgreduce myvg /dev/sdX ###then regrow that to fit the volume perfectly lvresize -l 100% /dev/myvg/lvtest resize2fs /dev/myvg/lvtest I hope you're on ext2/3/4 . ...


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Are you sure you need to fsfreeze the fs? I've not yet heard of an issue with quiesced snaps of Linux on ESXi -- and I was sure to have heard that the vm-tools will allow the linux VM to quiesce properly via, well, not a fsfreeze but I thought it was more a very short suspend operation. I've also not need an issue myself with snaps on quiesced live linux ...


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When pv/vg/lvdisplaying, you may find the -C option helpful. Most of the time, we only need to see what it tells us; eg lvdisplay -C . When you resize2fs and lvresize (or lvreduce), make sure your resize2fs gives you a volume SMALLER than your lvresize command gives. Very occasionally, if you don't have the FS smaller than the LV by a tiny amount, bad ...


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It's easiest to: Use VBoxManage to resize the Virtual Disk. You've already done this. Download A Gparted Live ISO Set Virtualbox to boot the GParted Live CD, on the VM Disk you resized in step 1. Complete the Resizing Operations in GParted, as GParted >=0.14.x supports LVM Shutdown the VM and remove the ISO from the virtual drive. Restart the VM. Twiddle ...


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I had a lot of similar troubles. A few things: do the VDI resize whilst the machine is powered off resize the partition with fdisk before resizing anything related to LVM you've possibly set your /dev/sda2 to extend past the end of the disk if you also have /dev/sda1 (you used the full 20G for /dev/sda2, but it probably does not start at 0) I found this ...


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There is plenty of space in your /home but this space is currently allocated to the centos-home logical volume, and cannot be used on another one. You should either reduce or re-create centos-home to a smaller size to retrieve some unallocated space. To reduce (assuming /home fs is ext4 and you want to set 100G for it): # umount /home # e2fsck -f ...


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As @Laszlo noted, freezing is just a part of a backup process. You freeze the filesystem first to force all buffered information that is about to be written to the disk to be flushed to the disk. When filesystem is freezed no data is going to change on the filesystem during the backup process. After you freezed your filesystem you can proceed with backup ...


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I figured it out myself! I discovered mhddfs and it seems to do exactly what I want. I'm about to test with a VirtualBox, but I believe I will be using SnapRAID with mhddfs (probably all running on Lubuntu) and it solves my problem.


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There is a high risk of data loss but it should work if you have enough free space to work around segments of data first. First format a empty drive, add it to a new LVM array, and then move over the data from disk two to the new lvm aray of one disk. Format and add the second disk, then move data from disk 3 to the LVM array (that now is disks 1 and 2). ...


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First, I create a partition type 8e(LVM) on /dev/sda3, and extend current volume group size by adding physical volume into volume group u64 vgextend u64 /dev/sda3. Second, extend logical volume root lvextend -L+22g u64/root. Third, resize the ext4 filesystem resize2fs /dev/mapper/u64-root. Similarly, extend the swap logical volume lvextend -L+3g ...


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From man fsfreeze: -f, --freeze This option requests the specified a filesystem to be frozen from new modifications. When this is selected, all ongoing transactions in the filesystem are allowed to complete, new write system calls are halted, other calls which modify the filesystem are halted, and all dirty data, metadata, and log information are ...


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This also worked for me. vgchange -a y -name of volume group- Following a kernel patch my RHEL system failed to reboot. Complaining of a missing /dev/mapper/VG-lv file. Booted to single-user and commented out of /etc/fstab. Once online I found my encrypted disk was showing as "unkown device" using pvs. Fixed this but still no device files for the ...


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I had a similar problem recently having added a new disk to the LV of my root partition. After that grub couldn't find the root partition identified by UUID. I edited the grub command line (at boot, by pressing "e") from root=UUID=[blah] to root=/dev/mapper/[hostname]-root (the LV containing /sbin/init). This allowed me to boot. From there I updated grub's ...


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Encrypted volumes are listed in /etc/crypttab. You need to update that file, to remove the volume that you no longer want mounted. After doing this, you need to rebuild the initramfs, by running sudo update-initramfs -u If you want to have three encrypted partitions on the same disk, then you should have a single encrypted volume instead of three, and ...



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