Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

I'm not sure if this is the one-and-done solution, but it worked for me. I had to create my "LVM" with striping options. lvcreate -L 217T -i2 -I64 -n lv_share VolGroup See 4.4.2. Creating Striped Volumes. Then I had to mount it with the -o inode64 option, as Mark mentioned. See 8.2. Mounting an XFS File System.


1

It is not something I would do online but I think it is possible. I guess you are using ext4. umount /home $ umount /home shrink the /home filesystem $ fsck -f /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_home $ resize2fs /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_home 80G shrink the /home logical volume $ lvreduce -L -40G /dev/mapper/VolGroup-lv_home resize the /home partition to the size of ...


1

You cannot resize or change at all any partition on a storage device that is currently mounted. That means that your system needs to be shutdown if you intend to modify the root partition (since you cannot unmount it) You will need to boot in an external OS (e.g. using a live-CD) to perform these tasks. I would recommend you to backup any sensible data ...


0

The warning messages about the file descriptor leaking are indeed harmless, and are being tracked in bug 592834. You might want to contribute your findings there; I'm not sure Colin (the maintainer) has been able to reproduce the bug in this instance...


0

A “physical volume” is LVM terminology for the underlying storage on which it puts data. Some typical examples of physical volumes include a whole disk a disk partition a RAID array an encrypted volume A volume group is an intermediate abstraction layer between physical volumes (corresponding to the underlying storage) and logical volumes (each ...


4

The physical volume (PV) is simply the partition with LVM metadata added. You can't create the volume group (VG) without referring to the metadata, thus you have to first create the PV(s) that will be members of the VG. A physical extent (PE) is just that - the actual section of the disk that you're writing to, very similar to an old-style disk CHS ...


0

My problem got solved after changing kernel version to 3.10 and changing gpg version to an old one, that wasn't requiring pinentry to work and that i compiled statically. Although with new version i checked everything twice there always seemed to be an problem with pinentry. Also I think that genkernel wasn't including pinentry automatically. I had to ...


1

LVM is designed to allow easy resizing and redistributing space in exactly the situation you describe. However, Lambert's answer is incomplete as it fails to mention several things. The outline process you need to follow is: Use resize2fs to reduce the size of the /home filesystem Use lvresize to reduce the size of the /dev/mapper/nice--rack--vg-home ...


0

Have a look at lvresize. Use man lvresize to read about the options. The following commands should first reduce the size of the home logical volume by 3GB and then extend the root logical volume by 3GB: lvresize -r -L -3G /dev/nice-rack-vg/home lvresize -r -L +3G /dev/nice-rack-vg/root It is necessary that the home logical volume is unmounted to be able ...


0

From this link: Normally, each LVM command issues a disk scan to find all relevant physical volumes and to read volume group metadata. However, if the metadata daemon is running and enabled, this expensive scan can be skipped ... This can save a significant amount of I/O and reduce the time required to complete LVM operations, particularly on systems ...


0

A month ago, I had the same problem with a mirror volume. I solved updating to lvm2-2.02.116-3.fc21.x86_64 lvm2. Then I could run: vgreduce --removemissing --verbose myVG_NAME Excuse my English


1

Any user can get information with lsblk.  It has options that allow you to get simple output, full detailed or customized. Try: lsblk $ lsblk NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 238,5G 0 disk ├─sda1 8:1 0 2M 0 part ├─sda2 ...


3

LVM is built on the device mapper code in Linux. This means that all the LVM commands are actually creating and manipulating device mapper devices. So, the symlink to ../dm-1 is normal. If you are curious about the device mapper, you can inspect its state using dmsetup, e.g. dmsetup info /dev/dm-1. As for why you cannot see the swap device in df, that is ...


0

I answer to myself. Archlinux kernel for Odroid-C1 doesn't include the dm_raid module, mandatory to access LVM mirrors (now raid1 by default). The solution is to include it in the MODULES variable of the /etc/mkinitcpio.conf file and regenerate the uInitrd. Problem solved.


0

The old link doesn't seem to work, so there isn't enough detail here. At what point in the boot process does it hang, what are the last few messages before it gets stuck? Do you have a separate /boot partition?



Top 50 recent answers are included