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Does anyone have any idea about this as yet ? Why are there blank entries in the device mapper table ? [root@www ~]# dmsetup table lsi_ccfafeaadcb: 0 240121727 linear 22:64 0 vg_data-lv_ftpBERPCMC: vg_data-lv_ftpROC: vg_data-lv_ftpAZI: vg_data-lv_ftpBAX: vg_data-lv_ftpBER: vg_data-lv_ftpPAST: vg_data-lv_ftpBERTEX: vg_data-lv_ftpWURTH: vg_data-lv_ftpTEA:


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With the help above from Alexander Batischev, and some very useful information from Reddit user cookie_enthusiast on the /r/linuxquestions page on Reddit, I managed to get this working. It turns out that GRUB2 works well with UUIDs, and not so well with device names. With this knowledge in mind, we need the following 4 UUIDs at hand, before we can ...


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LVM itself doesn't care what the underlying storage is: SATA, SCSI; HDD, SSD; local, networked; physical, virtual; etc. Different types of disks have different performance characteristics, so you may want to put the different types of disks in different groups anyway. But this is not required. You may also want to span groups over different storage types ...


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LVM is pretty flexible, but moving the beginning of a physical volume is one thing that it can't do, as far as I know. However, you don't need to move the beginning of a PV to add more space, only to reduce it. To add more storage space, just use the free space as a PV and add it to the volume group. Give a name to the free space: make a partition. You can ...


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LVM (Logical Volume Manager) is a subsystem. At the lowest level is a PV (Physical Volume). Within the PV is a VG (Volume Group) and within the VG are the LVs (Logical Volumes). You seem to be asking how to move or resize the PV corresponding to /dev/sda4. In order to do this you first need to deactivate the VG. (gparted > deactivate partition.) Note that ...


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If you have LVM on it, the easy way out is to make a new partition of the free space, set it up as physical volume in LVM and add that physical volume to your volume group. You're probably right that gparted won't touch the partition as it is in use.


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You don't have to run anything after resizing, but you cannot just resize the logical volume even if you have unmounted the filesystem on it. You have the resize the filesystem first (for ext4 you can use resize2fs), to make sure there are unused blocks in the logical volume that can be freed up (to transfer to swap). This normally requires some calculation ...


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resize2fs probably didn't finish the job, but you can't tell because you missed the end of its output. You should not have gone ahead and executed lvreduce at that point. There is a very good chance that this corrupted part of your filesystem. Note that you cannot undo this operation by running lvextend and hoping that the lost bytes come back and that the ...


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Linux pretty much ignores partition types, it cares more about the content on those partitions. So you don't need a swap partition type to use swap in Linux, and thus there is no issue with LVM not having partition types either. But you have to use the correct partition type to stop Windows from attempting to format your Linux data/swap partitions... it's ...


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I think what happened is you did try to reduce lvm size before getting filesystem shrink. Should do resize2fs to shrink filesystem before lvmreduce Do not mount it. You might end up getting filesystem corruption. Check if you have vg metadata backup it is under /etc/lvm/ when you modify vg it puts there as default since you have access to there check it ...


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You script is far more complicated than it needs to be and has a few problems: You use backticks rather than $(). Your script ignores all but the first logical volume it finds. You assume that lack of a mount-point for an lvpath means that there are no logical volumes. This assumption is just plain wrong. both lvs and lvdisplay already tell you the device ...


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The LVM2 Volume Group(s) on your PV are started. Logical Volumes on this VG(s) might also be started. Stop them with lvchange -an and vgchange -an (after making sure no filesystems from any VG/LV is mounted.)


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Because the partition contains an LVM2 volume group, it's treated as busy (even if it doesn't appear mounted). You need to deactivate the VG: sudo vgscan # to discover the name of the volume group "mint-vg" sudo vgchange -a n mint-vg Then, in gparted, select GParted / Refresh Devices. This should remove the lock icon from the partitions. Aside: ...


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If the size of the disks are the same, you can copy the whole disk. dd if=/dev/sda of=/dev/sdb


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You've created a volume — an empty space where information can be stored. You can't mount it, because what gets mounted is a filesystem — a structure for information. Mounting makes a filesystem visible in a directory. Use the appropriate mkfs command to create a filesystem on the volume, e.g. to create an ext4 filesystem (the de facto standard on Linux) ...



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