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3

according to info from Peter Rajnoha about an old 2014 fedora bug 1152185, "The warning is there because if lvmetad is already instantiated and running, then using use_lvmetad=0 will cause LVM commands run under this setting to not notify lvmetad about any changes - therefore lvmetad may miss some information - hence the warning.". https://bugzilla.redhat....


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The resize2fs does not support shrinking of a mounted file system: DESCRIPTION The resize2fs program will resize ext2, ext3, or ext4 file systems. It can be used to enlarge or shrink an unmounted file system located on device. If the filesystem is mounted, it can be used to expand the size of the mounted filesystem, assuming the ...


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mdadm --detail --scan >> /etc/mdadm/mdadm.conf It's a good starting point for a mdadm.conf but tends to be too verbose. UUID alone is sufficient. MAILADDR your@address ARRAY /dev/md0 UUID=d8b8b4e5:e47b2e45:2093cd36:f654020d It is my understanding that pvmove really just copies everything then updates some metadata so the new physical location ...


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You're only using around 7.4GB on / and have 79GB free in LVM so, yes, you can create a new LV for / (and another one for /var) and copy the files from / and /var to them. I recommend using rsync for the copies. e.g. with the new / and /var mounted as /target and /target/var: rsync --archive --sparse --one-file-system --delete-during --delete-excluded \ ...


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Rolling back an installation should not be done by restoring the contents of a filesystem, as that will typically affect other installed packages as well. For a lightweight VM alternative, you might want to look at docker, which can be used to separate different userspace environments for different applications. Docker images are built from Makefile-like ...


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You should expand the Linux LVM partition /dev/sda2 for example with gparted and the resize the physical volume with "pvresize /dev/sda2". After that you should be able to use the additional space. Alternatively (this is more safer IMHO) you can create another Linux LVM partition on the free disk space, then create an additional Physical Volume and add it to ...


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In short, the steps are: Reboot or rescan the scsi bus: echo '1' > /sys/class/scsi_disk/0\:0\:0\:0/device/rescan Identify the correct disk: fdisk -l This will be something like /dev/sda or /dev/vda. Create a new partition with fdisk and label it as LVM (replace sdx with the correct disk): fdisk /dev/[sdx] Press p to print the partition table to ...


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I suppose you could change that single partition to an LVM volume, since you have enough free space for another copy of the contents. I'm thinking something like: resize2fs the filesystem to a smaller smaller. Delete the swap partition and resize the root partition to that smaller size Create a new partition, make an LVM PV out of it (and create a VG and ...


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Just so you know before you do anything take a full backup if you can or at least your root drive. Messing with LVM is all good until there is a mistake then its hard to get stuff back. Now you will want to do this on a live CD as the root partition needs to be unmounted and then from a terminal in the live session we will do the following. Make sure that ...



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