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2

If you want to overwrite the data of the encrypted disk with non-encrypted data anyway (i.e. you don't care about the current contents), you don't have to unlock the drive/partition first. If the partition has a particular uncommon partition type, you might want to change that, but it is not necessary. You can just use mkfs.ext4 (or any filesystem type you ...


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The kernel doesn't defer to user space, and even less running user space tools, in order to de/encrypt data on block devices. If you want your own encryption mechanism, you will need to implement it in the kernel and implement support in cryptsetup and Co to use it. Alternatively, you could do a fuse implementation maybe, however I wouldn't recommend any ...


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I'd assume the weakest link here is the SSHFS code -- the rest of the stuff is in kernel and pretty heavily used, so it's probably fine. I've never actually looked at any FUSE code before, so there could be something else going on that I've missed, but according to the SSHFS source code, SSHFS's implementation of fsync() doesn't do a whole bunch, it just ...


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file system confusion after suspend (Ubuntu 13.10) I have isolated recurring file system problems to correlate with suspending my laptop while the LUKS-encrypted USB disk is mounted. Commonly, it thinks that whatever directory I had open in a terminal is now empty after resuming from suspend. It seems likely that saving a file to such a directory could ...


13

Yes, you can do this by accessing the master key while the volume is decrypted. The quick and dirty to add a new passphrase: device=/dev/sda5 volume_name=foo cryptsetup luksAddKey $device --master-key-file <(dmsetup table --showkeys $volume_name | awk '{ print $5 }' | xxd -r -p) device and volume_name should be set appropriately. volume_name is the ...


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Thank you Anthon for your answer above, it greatly contributed to solving my problem. It seems the solution to my issue was two parts. The entry in /etc/default/grub, for me should read: GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="cryptdevice=/dev/sdb2:lvmpool root=/dev/mapper/lvmpool-root" To break down each entry: cryptdevice consists of the partition you applied ...


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Your problem seems to be in the difference of :crypt as volume group for /dev/sdb2 and using lvmpool- as volumegroup name as parameter for root. GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX="root=/dev/mapper/lvmpool-root cryptdevice=/dev/sdb2:crypt ro" The example here: cryptdevice=/dev/partition:MyStorage root=/dev/mapper/MyStorage-rootvol has matching :MyStorage and ...


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I got this same problem a few weeks ago (Debian Wheezy 7.6) and after some days of troubleshooting I found out that there was a config file missing which was preventing to the cryptroot script on init-top to run correctly, hence it was not stopping to ask the password via ssh, killing the dropbear at the end of the sequence (init-bottom). The config file is ...


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I think the key to find out whether it is a LVM-over-LUKS, or the other way around, is the order of crypt and lvm TYPEs in the output of lsblk command. Based on that reasoning, I conclude my setup is a LUKS-over-LVM. For the lsblk output for a LVM-over-LUKS type of setup, look at output showed by @frostschultz below. In my case, since /dev/sda3 is a "Linux ...


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cryptsetup luksDump /dev/fedora/01 shows the LVM logical volume to be a LUKS encrypted volume. The output of pvs or pvdisplay would show the partition /dev/sda3 to be a physical volume. Thus you have LUKS over LVM. At a lower level, you have LVM over PC partition. The output of lsblk confirms this: sda is a disk, sda3 is a partition (which contains an LVM ...


2

It's very odd to have a LUKS inside a plain crypt. Why encrypt twice? Once your filesystems are mounted, lsblk will show you what's what. NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT sda 8:0 0 59.6G 0 disk └─sda1 8:1 0 59.6G 0 part └─md0 9:0 0 ...


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You can see what you have like so: $ sudo blkid | grep crypto_LUKS /dev/mapper/fedora-home: UUID="XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX" TYPE="crypto_LUKS" That's a LVM logical volume with crypto LUKS on it. When I mount that volume it's mounted like this under Fedora 20: $ mount | grep home /dev/mapper/luks-XXXXX on /home type ext4 (rw,relatime,seclabel,data=ordered) If ...



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