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You can get it with pfiles /proc/* Check this post for solution http://atoz-networking.blogspot.in/2014/12/how-to-get-process-id-attached-with-port.html


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lsof always tries to obtain some basic information about all filesystems, even if the arguments happen to imply that no result will come from a particular filesystem. If it's unable to access a filesystem (specifically, to call stat at its mount point, as the message says), it complains. As root, you would normally have permission to access filesystems. ...


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FUSE and its access rights lsof by default checks all mounted file systems including FUSE - file systems implemented in user space which have special access rights in Linux. As you can see in this answer on Ask Ubuntu a mounted GVFS file system (special case of FUSE) is normally accessible only to the user which mounted it (the owner of gvfsd-fuse). Even ...


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Thanks to wurtel, this became apparent: While both fuser and lsof as used in my question both show the same process using both mountpoints, after either of those commands tell you the PID, running: lsof -p $PID does reveal exactly which mountpoint is being used. A bit of grepping and you're set.



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