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3

It seems impossible to copy base packages from boot media to RAM to build an alternative APT repository for installation with current Debian Installer. But you might be able to eject the media after boot and continue installation using "netboot" image which would download everything from the internet, not out of boot media. You can remove it permanently ...


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Do the chroot, as described in the question, and then do su - fred (or whatever your name is) or exec su - fred. Do chroot /mnt /bin/su - fred, so that the su will be the first thing that runs in the chroot environment. Note that both of the above assume that your fred user is defined in /mnt/etc/passwd. OR Do chroot --userspec=fred:bedrock ...


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Yum will do that by default in Live mode; anything you install whilst running off a live optical disc is installed to RAM because you are running off of RAM as it is. If you want to do it explicitly, though, you can create a RAM disk: mkdir foo mount -t tmpfs -o size=4096M bar /foo where: mount is the command. -t tmpfs specifies the type of filesystem. ...


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Have you tried just using su? Most of the time the default user on a livecd has passwordless sudo, and can also su passwordlessly to any other user.


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Tested on VM. Was able to boot from Trisquel Live ISO (residing on hard disk) using this method. Required steps would look like this: After booting to your Ubuntu Live disk, start it's installation process. You would need to do at least minimal installation of the system on /dev/sda4 to get a working and bootable GRUB. But it's easier to just do full ...


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Thanks to other answers I was able to find this thread: What's the proper way to prepare chroot to recover a broken Linux installation?. As every step is extensively explained in the provided thread on SuperUser I will only provide a very simple solution to what I was trying to achieve. This approach is a great way to recover or change certain files from ...


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I found an answer . Just to let you know, even using an ubuntu live CD, might just not do it. I have used this useful link : # sudo modprobe ufs # mkdir ~/ufs_mount # sudo mount -r -t ufs -o ufstype=ufs2 /dev/sdb1 /home/<your_username>/ufs_mount as home directory name. sdb1 the drive desired to get into.. However you cannot write into a file in ...


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The directory ~/.zzz_encfs is located in your home directory. In the shell, ~ at the beginning of a path represents your home directory. If your live system mounts filesystems of your disk automatically, check the GUI or run cat /proc/mounts to see where they may be mounted. Usually the mount points are sudirectories of /media or subdirectories of ...


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OK, so I do have a working read-only system on an SD card that allows the read/write switch to be set to read-only mode. I'm going to answer my own question, since I have a feeling I'll be looking here again for the steps, and hopefully this will help someone else out. While setting various directories in /etc/fstab as read-only on a Red Hat Enterprise ...


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I would highly recommend YUMI if you are making this on windows, its a subset of pendrive tho i found it far more straight forward and much easier to load multiple bootable isos onto link:http://www.pendrivelinux.com/yumi-multiboot-usb-creator/ also super easy to edit the grub menu if you are into that sort of thing.



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