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8

Edited for clarity There won't be a particular best distribution because your purpose is too narrow for a dedicated distribution. Any of hundreds of actively maintained distributions can run the same software you need, as a "live CD." You should look for something widely used that has relatively updated packages so that you can have the best chance of using ...


7

If an attacker can boot a live CD in your environment, your environment is not secure. This is one of the reasons why physical security is so important. As a general rule, physical access to the machine is all that's ever needed to compromise it. Unix permissions are enforced by the kernel. If you run a live CD and are root, there's no real difference than ...


6

Yes it is. Either by using the CD as a repository, or by booting into the live session and downloading the package manually and then installing from your normal OS or even by setting up a chroot environment. IN the examples below, I am using apt-get xfce as the command you will want to run but dpkg-reconfigure or whatever else would work as well. 1. Use the ...


5

This isn't a serious security breach, this is how Unix & Unix filesystems work. When you booted this live DVD and provided the password to sudo that was the password of the live distro, and not your own. Unless you're using whole drive encryption like TrueCrypt or dm-crypt, anyone can mount your system's hard drive and see any files they want on it, ...


3

I would try Knoppix. I've had good luck with it running on older hardware in the past, especially when booting it as a LiveCD. Also I might try using Unetbootin to install an ISO onto a USB thumbdrive and boot the system using that instead.              


3

Have you looked at The All In One Boot Floppy? It can boot a CD with a few menu selections. It using Smart Boot Manager underneath so you can look at that to make something without (or with less) interaction.


3

We've used HDAT2 and Spinrite for several HDDs recoveries. Both have worked well. We were particularly impresses with HDAT2's ability to recover a HDD enough so that we could use Clonezilla to copy the HDD to another HDD. Spinrite was unsuccessful on that particular drive, but has recovered drives for us in the past. screenshots of HDAT2     ...


2

PCLinuxOS is another solid choice for use as a presentation distro. It comes with the following applications: VLC LibreOffice Firefox Flash PDF Reader The list goes on and on of what it can do. The download is 1.6GB, and the windowing environment is KDE. screenshots Here's some screenshots of it in action, as I put it through it's paces. main menu ...


2

Your question for the perfect live-distribution might be a bit misleading. As far as I know there are no out-of-the-box distributions live cds with all your needs. This is mainly due to licensing issues. For example delivering an iso with adobe flash included will be a problem. What you are looking for is some way to create your own live cd as of your ...


2

I use Linux Mint 13 LTS Cinnamon edition as in my laptop, for pretty much everything, including preesntations. For your requirements: The default pdf reader is evince: simple and effective. It comes with LibreOffice installed. I usually have troubles with presentations created in MS PowerPoint (layouts, videos, sounds, templates), so my choice was install ...


2

I think you don't understand how Live CDs work. When you boot, the CD gets mounted readonly. Then there's a squashfs union-mounted on top, mounted read-write. This means that the entire CD does not, in fact, get loaded into RAM. Therefore, executables aren't automatically in RAM and you still need to load them.


2

On some embedded architectures, the kernel supports execute in-place (XIP). It's not appropriate for LiveCDs, because these use squashfs and union mounts, and you need a decompressed copy of the data. CDs are also particularly slow; use a swap partition (possibly with zswap) if you don't have a lot of memory and want the kernel to be able to page out ...


2

I had a similar situation (laptop with Windows 8 preinstalled which I did not want to bury yet, and Linux installed but not wanting to boot), and I solved it using the following steps: I set the BIOS to Legacy mode, with secure boot option disabled, and booted into the live USB which I had been able to install Linux with: Backbox 3.09, which is based in ...


2

I have used Sardu for that job. It allows you to create a multiboot DVD and you choose the distroes you would like to multi boot into. It involves downloading the distros and this program will then boot thse distroes. Details here the process is detailed but its worth the trouble.


2

You can use live-build system to build iso or usb image, with various sets of packages on board. Example of shell command: lb config noauto \ --apt aptitude \ --bootappend-live toram \ --security "true" \ --apt-secure "true" \ --linux-flavours clean \ --binary-images iso-hybrid \ --bootloader grub \ ...


2

An better alternative to all in one boot floppy is probably to use BCDL. The bootable CD loader automaticaly boots the first CDROM. The problem is that its CD driver is no longer up to date, so you need to upgrade VIDE-CDD.SYS on the floppy with e.g. XCDROM.SYS taken from here. (Only tried with a virtual machine, not with a real FDD).


2

Partitioning took place before the error happened so whenever you run the LiveCD on the partitioned virtual hard drive, it is still partitioned. The LiveCD just read what it perceived as a partitioned hard disk. In order to wipe everything clean, you could either delete the current virtual machine and create a new one, or use the disk tools(cfdisk, fdisk, ...


1

Sounds like you're missing the video driver and X is defaulting to a generic video driver. For example, if your video card is an AMD, you need the radeon XF86 video drivers, and if you're running inside a virtual machine you need the vmware or virtualbox drivers. These drivers are part of X, and to put an example, in Debian they appear on the package manager ...


1

This problem occurs because portions of your partition table remain. There are superblocks for each Linux partition that you create at various offsets in the filesystem depending on the specific implementation. These are markers that the kernel reads when interpreting a physical block device because when you partition a device you rarely zero it - instead ...


1

Installing multiple DE's and such shouldn't alter the system in a way that affects any of the others much -- e.g., installing GNOME will not step on KDE's toes. Installing multiple display managers (the GUI login: KDM, GDM, XDM, etc.) may create a hassle, but I don't think you need to install GDM in order to install GNOME, and so on. They probably don't ...


1

The original code in Linux for NTFS partitions could change an NTFS partition, but required you to do a disk check after rebooting into Windows NT. I am not sure when this was, it might have been those in last millenium with SuSE 4. And not working from a live CD, but from a dual boot machine. That changed with NTFS3G, where this is no longer necessary ...


1

I've not attempted this myself but I would start with the advice given in this AskUbuntu Q&A titled: Using SquashFS to edit a Live CD?. Specifically there is a Linux Journal article referenced in the Q&A, a 3 part Paranoid Penguin series titled: Customizing Linux Live CDs. Also Ubuntu has some very good/detailed directions on doing this too: ...


1

You need to use mkisofs to make the ISO mkisofs -o youriso.iso -b isolinux/isolinux.bin -c isolinux/boot.cat -no-emul-boot -boot-load-size 4 -boot-info-table -J -R -V youriso-live ~/isodistro/iso -o is the output file -b is the boot image that it boots -c is the boot catalog and ~/isodistro/iso is the path of the files You can find the details on the ...


1

Never synch the database without updating your packages. Always use pacman -Syu, otherwise you may experience the sort of breakage you are seeing. Essentially, you have told pacman to refresh it's local database listing for a specific package, and not updated any of the other packages (that may share libraries) at the same time. This is why partial upgrades ...


1

Turnkey Linux sounds like something that meets your list of requirements. Specifically you'll want to take a look at the Web Development versions. There's 2 types, Framework and Stack. Also you might want to look through the livecdlist.com list. It's dated but still has several distros listed that are active and thriving. Don't let the dates scare you off, ...


1

Use PLoP. You'll need a Window's machine to set up a cd. Instead of booting to the USB, you will boot to the cd which will then give you the option to boot from your USB. It's kinda a hack but it should work. http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/16822/


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With CentOS they typically produce release notes which include details of what's included in both the Live CD and the Live DVD. CentOS 6.4: http://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOSLiveDVD6.4 http://wiki.centos.org/Manuals/ReleaseNotes/CentOSLiveCD6.4 These are always announced on the CentOS mailing list: ...


1

What do you want from that LiveCD? Maybe a DVD that boots for you is fine for that if it lends you a shell (try Ctrl-Alt-F2/F3/...) and provides the tools needed. Try getting to the console, chrooting into the system installed (but lacking the bootloader) and running grub-install (with no additional arguments) by hand to see the error message. Did you ...


1

I don't think it's typical that Live CD's include developer tools such as make and autoconf. Now I realize Gentoo is meant to be built from source but given your situation I think you're options are one of the following: Compile the drivers on another Gentoo system that does have make and then manually copy the kernel .ko file(s) to the affected system. ...



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