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11

If it's a case of tail not working at all, then it could be because your liveCD is using the overlayfs filesystem, which has a bug regarding notifications of modified files. You could try to move the log to another filesystem, such as /tmp if the application creating the log has an option to do so. You could also carry out your test in /tmp instead of your ...


9

I use SystemRescueCd. It boots to a bash shell (where you can startx if you want) and can mount ntfs drives using ntfs-3g. It also includes a lot of rescue tools.


9

Full disk encryption is usually done using the dm-crypt Device Mapper target, with a nested LVM (Logical Volume Manager) inside. So to reset your password you'll have to Unlock/open the crypto container; this is done using cryptsetup Activate the logical volumes; vgchange is used for this. Usually you won't need to care about this. Just let the initrd ...


8

Although it might be bloated, you could just use Ubuntu Live (netbook or desktop). If you copy that to a USB disk via their usb-creator-gtk, you can specify an amount of persistent storage for the user. If you need to make more modifications to a default install, you can always take a look at this article from lifehacker about customizing a live cd.


8

Edited for clarity There won't be a particular best distribution because your purpose is too narrow for a dedicated distribution. Any of hundreds of actively maintained distributions can run the same software you need, as a "live CD." You should look for something widely used that has relatively updated packages so that you can have the best chance of using ...


8

Yes it is. Either by using the CD as a repository, or by booting into the live session and downloading the package manually and then installing from your normal OS or even by setting up a chroot environment. IN the examples below, I am using apt-get xfce as the command you will want to run but dpkg-reconfigure or whatever else would work as well. 1. Use the ...


7

If an attacker can boot a live CD in your environment, your environment is not secure. This is one of the reasons why physical security is so important. As a general rule, physical access to the machine is all that's ever needed to compromise it. Unix permissions are enforced by the kernel. If you run a live CD and are root, there's no real difference than ...


6

On the screenshot you provided, with the Live CD selected, click the little CD icons on the right. That should provide you with a dropdown box from which you can select Remove Disc from Virtual Drive


6

Linux Mint seems to be an exact match to what you're looking for! It includes allmost everything you need. OpenOffice, codecs, Firefox, jockey for easy installation of drivers (if needed), XChat, Pidgin, VLC, Transmission (BitTorrent client), Java, ... etc. I've been using it for about a year now, and it hasn't let me down since that time. One thing I would ...


5

You have to bind-mount /dev /proc and maybe /sys to the chroot. You can use grml-chroot which automatically bind these three directories into your chroot.


5

This isn't a serious security breach, this is how Unix & Unix filesystems work. When you booted this live DVD and provided the password to sudo that was the password of the live distro, and not your own. Unless you're using whole drive encryption like TrueCrypt or dm-crypt, anyone can mount your system's hard drive and see any files they want on it, ...


4

There are only two versions of grub listed there, the 1x series (most recent being 0.97) and the 2x series (most recent being 1.99). Both can be customized and used for your purpose. The 1x series has more standard compatibility with old hardware and distros, but we the 2x series is coming along nicly and many major distros are switching to it. 32bit vs 64 ...


4

While Gert's suggestion is probably the best one, it comes with the "disadvantages" that your daughter can do other stuff with her personal persistent storage as well. A simpler approach would be to just use a generic LIVE CD (take whichever you like) and put the list of websites coded as a landing-page somewhere: Drop the file somewhere and assign it a ...


4

Clonezilla would be a suitable product for a whole-disk image. It works in a fashion similar to Ghost.


4

what I do to distribute systems easily is create an image (using clonezilla over PXE and samba / nfs storage) and "cast" these images to different computers. This way I can rapidly restore images of my distributions. This is usefull if the hardware is quite the same. There is also an option to alter live-cd's. You can read more about this here. This is ...


3

One more idea: You can use a normal Live CD without persistent storage and use an online service like http://www.delicious.com/ or http://www.google.com/bookmarks/ to keep track of favorite pages.


3

Instead of LiveCD, you can create LiveUSB. It functions just like LiveCD but can store the information persistently in a file system called Casper-rw. This file can reside on hardrive or USB drive itself. https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LiveUsbPendrivePersistent http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_USB http://www.debuntu.org/how-to-install-ubuntu-linux-on-usb-bar


3

You don't even need a livecd; you can correct it within grub. You can press e at the grub menu to edit the entry and fix whatever you broke, then ctrl-x to boot the corrected entry. Once the system is up and running, fix your cfg file permanently. Doing it that way from the live cd, you need to not mount the partition read only. If you didn't mount it ...


3

I ended up installing a Debian installation disk to a USB flash drive using 'sudo dd if="~/Desktop/mini.img" of="/dev/rdisk2 bs=1m", then from a successful install of Debian I could chroot into a Gentoo tarball, and install that way. To reformat hard-drives, I booted into the "rescue" mode of the Debian install disk. Same went for fixing yaboot problems ...


3

"Can't play a video" has nothing to do with a CPU being 32 / 64-bit. Let me dispell any misconception you may have about that. If your CPU were 32-bit-only and you tried to boot a 64-bit operating system, it would not boot. Period. You would never get all the way to a graphical environment, only to find that some application on the desktop, like a video ...


3

I tend to use SysRescueCD. It contains many tools that I find useful for recovering data, like ddrescue and testdisk.


3

We've used HDAT2 and Spinrite for several HDDs recoveries. Both have worked well. We were particularly impresses with HDAT2's ability to recover a HDD enough so that we could use Clonezilla to copy the HDD to another HDD. Spinrite was unsuccessful on that particular drive, but has recovered drives for us in the past. screenshots of HDAT2     ...


3

Have you looked at The All In One Boot Floppy? It can boot a CD with a few menu selections. It using Smart Boot Manager underneath so you can look at that to make something without (or with less) interaction.


3

I would try Knoppix. I've had good luck with it running on older hardware in the past, especially when booting it as a LiveCD. Also I might try using Unetbootin to install an ISO onto a USB thumbdrive and boot the system using that instead.              


3

I can confirm that the official ISO you can download from the website are indeed Live-DVD iso (except for the minimal ones, which only allow installing). If you aren't satisfied, the official documentation covers how to build your own customized image By the way they also suggest beginner linux users against using kali, which is supposed to be targeted at ...


3

Do the chroot, as described in the question, and then do su - fred (or whatever your name is) or exec su - fred. Do chroot /mnt /bin/su - fred, so that the su will be the first thing that runs in the chroot environment. Note that both of the above assume that your fred user is defined in /mnt/etc/passwd. OR Do chroot --userspec=fred:bedrock ...


2

As of today I have successfully installed this distribution and can use it as if it were Arch :) Below is the simplest way to do so: Install Arch on the hard drive Remove everything in / (in the local disk), except for /boot Mount the root-image.sqfs image in the linuX-gamers live DVD and copy everything inside to / Repeat the previous step with the ...


2

These instructions assume that you want to create a live disc from just one Debian DVD (or CD). I don't know how to combine different CD/DVD images to be one repository. Install a web server: sudo apt-get install cherokee Create a mount point on the web server path and mount the disc: sudo mkdir /var/www/squeeze sudo mount /dev/scd0 /var/www/squeeze ...


2

Have you had a look at Linux Mint? Never used it myself, but it does have a live DVD version including at least some codecs and OpenOffice. Package listing from DistroWatch here.


2

I have got a perfect chain loader with SysLinux, Grub4Dos and Grub2, and here is my configs: Syslinux LABEL DSL KERNEL memdisk INITRD /iso/dsl.iso APPEND iso raw LABEL GRUB4DOS KERNEL /boot/grub.exe Grub4Dos title Paragon Partition Manager map (hd0,0)/iso/paragon-bootable-media.iso (hd32) map --hook chainloader (hd32) boot title Syslinux chainloader ...



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