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8

I use SystemRescueCd. It boots to a bash shell (where you can startx if you want) and can mount ntfs drives using ntfs-3g. It also includes a lot of rescue tools.


8

Although it might be bloated, you could just use Ubuntu Live (netbook or desktop). If you copy that to a USB disk via their usb-creator-gtk, you can specify an amount of persistent storage for the user. If you need to make more modifications to a default install, you can always take a look at this article from lifehacker about customizing a live cd.


8

Edited for clarity There won't be a particular best distribution because your purpose is too narrow for a dedicated distribution. Any of hundreds of actively maintained distributions can run the same software you need, as a "live CD." You should look for something widely used that has relatively updated packages so that you can have the best chance of using ...


7

If an attacker can boot a live CD in your environment, your environment is not secure. This is one of the reasons why physical security is so important. As a general rule, physical access to the machine is all that's ever needed to compromise it. Unix permissions are enforced by the kernel. If you run a live CD and are root, there's no real difference than ...


6

Linux Mint seems to be an exact match to what you're looking for! It includes allmost everything you need. OpenOffice, codecs, Firefox, jockey for easy installation of drivers (if needed), XChat, Pidgin, VLC, Transmission (BitTorrent client), Java, ... etc. I've been using it for about a year now, and it hasn't let me down since that time. One thing I would ...


6

Yes it is. Either by using the CD as a repository, or by booting into the live session and downloading the package manually and then installing from your normal OS or even by setting up a chroot environment. IN the examples below, I am using apt-get xfce as the command you will want to run but dpkg-reconfigure or whatever else would work as well. 1. Use the ...


5

This isn't a serious security breach, this is how Unix & Unix filesystems work. When you booted this live DVD and provided the password to sudo that was the password of the live distro, and not your own. Unless you're using whole drive encryption like TrueCrypt or dm-crypt, anyone can mount your system's hard drive and see any files they want on it, ...


4

There are only two versions of grub listed there, the 1x series (most recent being 0.97) and the 2x series (most recent being 1.99). Both can be customized and used for your purpose. The 1x series has more standard compatibility with old hardware and distros, but we the 2x series is coming along nicly and many major distros are switching to it. 32bit vs 64 ...


4

While Gert's suggestion is probably the best one, it comes with the "disadvantages" that your daughter can do other stuff with her personal persistent storage as well. A simpler approach would be to just use a generic LIVE CD (take whichever you like) and put the list of websites coded as a landing-page somewhere: Drop the file somewhere and assign it a ...


4

what I do to distribute systems easily is create an image (using clonezilla over PXE and samba / nfs storage) and "cast" these images to different computers. This way I can rapidly restore images of my distributions. This is usefull if the hardware is quite the same. There is also an option to alter live-cd's. You can read more about this here. This is ...


3

One more idea: You can use a normal Live CD without persistent storage and use an online service like http://www.delicious.com/ or http://www.google.com/bookmarks/ to keep track of favorite pages.


3

You don't even need a livecd; you can correct it within grub. You can press e at the grub menu to edit the entry and fix whatever you broke, then ctrl-x to boot the corrected entry. Once the system is up and running, fix your cfg file permanently. Doing it that way from the live cd, you need to not mount the partition read only. If you didn't mount it ...


3

Instead of LiveCD, you can create LiveUSB. It functions just like LiveCD but can store the information persistently in a file system called Casper-rw. This file can reside on hardrive or USB drive itself. https://wiki.ubuntu.com/LiveUsbPendrivePersistent http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_USB http://www.debuntu.org/how-to-install-ubuntu-linux-on-usb-bar


3

"Can't play a video" has nothing to do with a CPU being 32 / 64-bit. Let me dispell any misconception you may have about that. If your CPU were 32-bit-only and you tried to boot a 64-bit operating system, it would not boot. Period. You would never get all the way to a graphical environment, only to find that some application on the desktop, like a video ...


3

We've used HDAT2 and Spinrite for several HDDs recoveries. Both have worked well. We were particularly impresses with HDAT2's ability to recover a HDD enough so that we could use Clonezilla to copy the HDD to another HDD. Spinrite was unsuccessful on that particular drive, but has recovered drives for us in the past. screenshots of HDAT2     ...


3

Have you looked at The All In One Boot Floppy? It can boot a CD with a few menu selections. It using Smart Boot Manager underneath so you can look at that to make something without (or with less) interaction.


3

I would try Knoppix. I've had good luck with it running on older hardware in the past, especially when booting it as a LiveCD. Also I might try using Unetbootin to install an ISO onto a USB thumbdrive and boot the system using that instead.              


2

These instructions assume that you want to create a live disc from just one Debian DVD (or CD). I don't know how to combine different CD/DVD images to be one repository. Install a web server: sudo apt-get install cherokee Create a mount point on the web server path and mount the disc: sudo mkdir /var/www/squeeze sudo mount /dev/scd0 /var/www/squeeze ...


2

Have you had a look at Linux Mint? Never used it myself, but it does have a live DVD version including at least some codecs and OpenOffice. Package listing from DistroWatch here.


2

As of today I have successfully installed this distribution and can use it as if it were Arch :) Below is the simplest way to do so: Install Arch on the hard drive Remove everything in / (in the local disk), except for /boot Mount the root-image.sqfs image in the linuX-gamers live DVD and copy everything inside to / Repeat the previous step with the ...


2

I'm afraid you will have to do many tests to create a fairly universal tester script. Here are things you might look at: The output of lspci -v might contain VM name, especially in VGA description. dmidecode output might be the hardest thing for a VM to fake (simulate a "real" hardware) - look for similar things as in lspci.


2

You could build your own. While this clearly seems to be a chicken-and-egg problem, I just had a deeper look at SUSE Studio and it could be of great use here. Just login/create an account, choose a base template (say, "minimal X"), add software, choose "Live CD" in the Build tab. Since all OpenSUSE repositories are available, you should find everything ...


2

Acronis True Image is a possible solution. But If you want to, you can also use the command-line: On the receiver side: netcat ...>yourdisk.dat.gz On the sender side: dd if=/dev/sda bs=1M|gzip -|netcat ...


2

Journalling depends on the filesystem being used, but if you're using a live Linux distribution, there usually isn't any persistence by default (with some exceptions). If your filesystem is journalling (check /proc/mounts to find out which filesystem is being used) I would not rely on anything to try and "securely delete" a file (unless that filesystem is ...


2

I ended up installing a Debian installation disk to a USB flash drive using 'sudo dd if="~/Desktop/mini.img" of="/dev/rdisk2 bs=1m", then from a successful install of Debian I could chroot into a Gentoo tarball, and install that way. To reformat hard-drives, I booted into the "rescue" mode of the Debian install disk. Same went for fixing yaboot problems ...


2

Beyond LFS shows you how to add additional packages to LFS beyond the minimal installation. But LFS/BLFS doesn't really provide you a good way to build a Live CD. Gentoo, another source-based distribution, has a step-by-step guide for making a custom Gentoo-based Live CD/DVD. If you want to build a custom source-based distribution this is probably your best ...


2

liveCDs will not have all required plugins by default to media files. This looks like a plugin problem which i suggest you should connect to internet with the livecd, and try playing the video. Use the default media player and it will suggest the missing plugins. You should follow the instructions to download/install it and then try playing the files.


2

On Ubuntu you have Remastersys. To install it use the following command sudo apt-get install remastersys To make a distributable livecd/dvd of your system use command sudo remastersys dist this will create iso image in /home/remastersys/ folder. Then burn it! :) LINK http://www.ubuntugeek.com/creating-custom-ubuntu-live-cd-with-remastersys.html


2

I use Linux Mint 13 LTS Cinnamon edition as in my laptop, for pretty much everything, including preesntations. For your requirements: The default pdf reader is evince: simple and effective. It comes with LibreOffice installed. I usually have troubles with presentations created in MS PowerPoint (layouts, videos, sounds, templates), so my choice was install ...


2

Your question for the perfect live-distribution might be a bit misleading. As far as I know there are no out-of-the-box distributions live cds with all your needs. This is mainly due to licensing issues. For example delivering an iso with adobe flash included will be a problem. What you are looking for is some way to create your own live cd as of your ...



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