New answers tagged

0

I used the USB image writer on my virtualised linux mint and this time with usb 2 to write the linux mint ISO, IT WORKS! I am able to boot to live disk on my main computer


0

Based on [http://askubuntu.com/questions/295701/what-would-be-the-differences-between-a-persistent-usb-live-session-and-a-instal], you cannot use a 2GB flash drive to make a "persistent live usb installation". This page is about Ubuntu but to my knowledge Elementary OS is Ubuntu based, so it must apply to Elementary OS too. According to the article you would ...


2

The easiest way (at least for me as a Linux user) would be to start up Linux from a live CD/DVD and use gparted to partition the USB drive, then install the three distros into the three partitions. You need to install GRUB such that it recognizes the three OS installs and lists them in the boot menu, this is a bit tricky and probably beyond the scope for ...


2

You want to look into GRUB (http://www.gnu.org/software/grub/manual/grub.html#Introduction). Grub can boot particular partitions on a disk, and is how most dual boot windows/Linux machines are managed. It can also allow you to boot as many linux distros as you have installed onto partitions. The easiest method (if your hardware supports it) would be to try ...


0

To make this explicit - "I would like to simply use dd, as I do now." "Windows and others may only see the first partition on a usb device even when there are multiple partitions." I don't think these goals are practical to achieve, so you will have to compromise somewhere.


1

Bootable usb thumb drive with 2 partitions. Windows and others may only see the first partition on a usb device even when there are multiple partitions. Therefore make your first primary partition the fat32 or NTFS partition so windows can see and use it. partition 1 - ntfs or vfat partition 2 - ext4 The second partition is where you will store the ...


1

First use DD to make the usb bootable with kali. Then use gparted and use the remaining to create the other partitions on your device. Then, you should put boot flag on the partition with kali.


0

I found the answer in the link kindly supplied by richard above in the comments. unix.stackexchange.com/questions/115792/ Basically I had to do go into BIOS and disable 'Secure Boot', then enable 'Legacy Boot'. After this, the steps outlined in my question worked. Thanks.


0

In a GUI session, click on the icon with the bars to bring up the network menu. You can configure network connections from that menu. If you have bars then you are connected to the wifi. It implies that your credentials for the wifi are correct. If you're on a guest network (common in public places such as caf├ęs, hotels, stations, etc.) then the wifi ...



Top 50 recent answers are included