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Can anything be smaller than damn small linux at 50Mbytes. It has vim and can persist data if you add a partition to your usb key.


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As a suggestion, you can always download a Gentoo minimal install ISO image to copy onto a USB key. It contains everything to access the network anyway. If you fancy some exploration you can still trim it down to disable or remove networking (i.e. emerge openrc without netifrc and newnet USE flags) but you'll have to rebuild an entire system.


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The simple way is to do it by hand. Lets start with the assumption that you have at your disposal a linux machine with an available usb port and that you have a blank usb thumb drive (or one that you don't mind wiping). You can use an existing thumb drive distro for your setup distro. Insert but do not mount the thumb drive. Partition it placing the fat ...


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The key to the issue is that Windows will only read the first partition on a removable drive, and a bootable FAT32 can only use (addressable space) 4G. So the solution given here: Multiple Partitions on 64GB USB drive (Windows) was to change the USB registration to tell Windows that it is a fixed drive, and then it would access the other partition as well. ...


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It took me a while to understand how to create a live-usb with arch linux. The solution is simple. I just wrote: $ dd if=/adress/of/iso-file of=/adress/of/usb-stick/sda/not/sdaY/don't/write/the/partition/number I worked a lot with gnome disk utility and gparted. It's okay to clear the partition table of the USB-Stick. One interesting fact is important. ...


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The solution was to download VirtualBox and to use it to install and run CentOS 7 from within Windows 8.1. This is infinitely more convenient than the dual boot setup. I did have to go into the BIOS settings of the PC and enable "Virtualization Features" before the machine allowed CentOS 7 to install. There were problems involved in the dual boot ...


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Can someone please explain how to trigger a command line only boot of CentOS 7 from a USB boot stick? How about single user mode? Press TAB at the CentOS 7 boot menu. Append init=/sysroot/bin/sh to the kernel arguments. vmlinuz initrd=initrd.img inst.stage2=hd:LABEL=CentOS\x207\x20x86_64 rd.live.check quiet init=/sysroot/bin/sh And then... chroot ...


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Try booting to single user mode:click. After that you could use the command: init 3 to boot to runlevel 3. I haven't tried this on centos 7. but this is how i did it in previous versions.


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Take a look at this: Create a Larger than 4GB Casper Partition, and How to resize casper-rw Images in Windows. The tutorials are old for ubuntu, but I think it can be used for any Linux distros. The reason why a separate partition must be created is because the USB creator only makes one partition by default (FAT32 filesystem). Onto that partition it copies ...


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It seems that your HD is really dying, that's why you have this "Input/output error" when cp is trying to read the file. You could run 'dmesg' and if you see lines with 'I/O errors', that would confirm the problem with your HD.


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Part 1 Download Refind, and see the question I asked recently dealing with some of the issues you'll face. Assuming you're using Windows 8.1, you'll want to use the Refind CD-R Image. Be sure to extract the ISO from the zip file, and mount it in Windows 8.1. Note: You need not burn the image as Windows 8.1 supports mounting ISO files now like Linux has ...


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I've managed to solve this problem, but I'm still wonder if there's a better and easier solution. Anyways, if you have bad blocks at the beginning of the device and you are unable to burn a live image, you should make two partitions: Then you download an image and check its first partition's offset: # parted ...


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If there is enough space at the beginning of the drive to install GRUB (or any other bootloader really), and the LiveCD supports loop-mounting ISO, you can create a filesystem that has the bad blocks mapped out or you can partition it to avoid bad blocks in the first place. Example grub.cfg boot entry for a Ubuntu Live CD: menuentry "Ubuntu 15.04 Desktop ...



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