New answers tagged

0

I found the answer in the link kindly supplied by richard above in the comments. unix.stackexchange.com/questions/115792/ Basically I had to do go into BIOS and disable 'Secure Boot', then enable 'Legacy Boot'. After this, the steps outlined in my question worked. Thanks.


0

In a GUI session, click on the icon with the bars to bring up the network menu. You can configure network connections from that menu. If you have bars then you are connected to the wifi. It implies that your credentials for the wifi are correct. If you're on a guest network (common in public places such as caf├ęs, hotels, stations, etc.) then the wifi ...


0

First find out the appropriate section by lsblk. I did by following here in the GUI sudo mkdir /mnt/foo sudo mount /dev/sda2 /mnt/foo sudo mount --bind /dev /mnt/foo/dev && sudo mount --bind /dev/pts /mnt/foo/dev/pts && sudo mount --bind /proc /mnt/foo/proc && sudo mount --bind /sys /mnt/foo/sys sudo chroot /mnt/foo sudo apt-get ...


0

Adding packages to a live USB and having those applications persist after rebooting is typically achieved by rebuilding the .iso image. Here are specific instructions for achieving USB persistence. https://wiki.sabayon.org/index.php?title=HOWTO:_Bootable_USB_with_persistance This tool appears to be able to create a persistent Sabayon live USB. http://...


0

You could wipe the partitions from the usb pendrive with (run all the below commands as root) : dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb bs=1M count=1000 sync This would write 1Gb of zeroes starting from the beginning of sdb so that would definitely erase any partition information. Then create a single partition with fdisk : fdisk /dev/sdb n p <enter> three ...


3

fdisk may not be able to open the device, because it sees a iso9660 filesystem. this could be confirmed with blkid /dev/sdb*. In Any case I would then probably try this: dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/sdb count=4 bs=1M This will remove any filesystem signature at the start try fdisk /dev/sdb again start with operation o (Create new MS-DOS partition table) Then, ...


0

The instructions are already documented by Debian. Edit: If you experience problems with the wired network card, and the card is Realtek, the following could be useful: $ apt-get update && apt-get install firmware-realtek


0

A Bootable USB device doesn't work that way. It would normally boot independent of your other OS and most times copied into RAM but some allow writing data for persistent boots, I.E to allow you to customize it by installing extra software on it.



Top 50 recent answers are included