Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

The shell will open the device /dev/sdX. All output of the cat command, which ends up being the contents of debian.iso, is written directly to that device. The end result is that debian.iso is written byte-for-byte to the start of the disk underlying /dev/sdX. In effect, the device node makes it appear that the low-level contents of your storage medium ...


7

There isn't such thing as "standard Linux". For learning (what do you want to learn, specifically?), a minimal install of Slackware should do. You can easily build a kernel that boots, but it will be useless without userspace applications (e.g. shell and utilities). If you want to build your own system from scratch, check Linux from Scratch. Linux From ...


6

Assuming you are on nix and the distro you are interested in is oneiric ozelot or above then the following should work sudo dd if=<isofile> of=/dev/sd<USBSTICK> oflag=direct bs=1048576 Please be triple careful with the argument to of. dd will NOT check if it's sensible/mounted/empty/..., it will just write. If you happen to specify your root ...


5

I resolved the problem myself: On a thread about live usb boot I found the hint that helped solving this: The USB-stick written with the downloaded original image with dd is mounted. Do this on any version of any *BSD system (need BSD because it needs UFS filesystem mount capability) Mac OSX would also do BTW. # mount /dev/da0a /mnt Then the following ...


5

You need to install an EFI bootloader to the USB drive; elilo is what I've used before, but you could potentially use GRUB2. The Ubuntu amd64 elilo package installs the 64bit binary to /usr/lib/elilo/elilo.efi and the 32bit binary to /usr/lib32/elilo/elilo.efi. EFI firmware will search removable media for a FAT32 filesystem containing the file ...


5

That looks to me like filesystem damage - the first screenshot show an IO error while trying to rename /etc/apt/sources.list.new, and the third screenshot shows a lot of ext2 errors. It probably can't boot because it can't write to its filesystem. What exactly is your goal? If you need to recover important data from the persistence image: Boot a working ...


4

There are only two versions of grub listed there, the 1x series (most recent being 0.97) and the 2x series (most recent being 1.99). Both can be customized and used for your purpose. The 1x series has more standard compatibility with old hardware and distros, but we the 2x series is coming along nicly and many major distros are switching to it. 32bit vs 64 ...


4

This is probably caused by some peculiarity of your BIOS. Definitely not intentional.


4

The LiveCD's are setup to specifically work with a read only system. When you copied the data via UNetBootin, it merely just made a copy, the only difference is the boot medium. The filesystem and the OS are still designed as if the medium is read-only, whether that is the case or not. The feature you are looking for is called "Persistence" or "Live CD ...


4

Slackware should do. And to be honest - there is no "standard" linux. You define your standard afer you defined what you need to do with it and what to expect from it. The low-level (plug and play, device-naming, network configuration, system configuration, detection of network services, hardening) is quite different on different linux distributions. Even ...


4

You might try looking at a BSD distribution. If you are mainly interested in having a look at how Unix works than the BSDs are nice and clean in my opinion, especially the so called base system, which you sound like you are interested in is clearly separated from the applications etc. I recommend FreeBSD, because, once you've had a look around, you may ...


4

I recommend you Install Ubuntu which is very user-friendly and doesn't depend on command line skills, etc, but as you learn them you can use them. Ubuntu has a massive community that will enable you to find answers easier than a custom built solution of your own.


4

I can have multiple driver configurations for every computer I plug it into and the correct driver set can be autodetected. Is there a way to do this with a Linux distro? A normal linux distro with a generic modular kernel already does this. Last time I checked, an out-of-the-box linux live CD would run on any x86 computer I had access to try it on ...


4

You can use any flavor of linux from a liveUSB, none will require the presence of a linux install on your machine. That's one of the main purposes of a liveCD/liveUSB, to be able to try/use a distro from an external medium, regardless of the OS that is actually installed on that machine. As long as you don't start any install setup, it will not touch your ...


3

Introduction For a drive with PC partitions (which is what you'll find on most USB sticks), the bootloader consist in a tiny part at the very beginning of the drive (the stage 1 bootloader, in the boot sector of the drive) and a larger part elsewhere (the stage 2 bootloader, in a file). The stage 1 data contains the physical location of stage 2. If you copy ...


3

Most “live CD” distributions can be installed on a pen drive instead of a CD. Then you can use the rest of the pen drive (if it's large enough) as storage. For example, for Ubuntu, prepare a “live CD” on a USB pen drive. The pen drive creator utility will let you choose how much space to devote to storage. Alternatively, just do a normal installation that ...


3

You can use Tiny Core Linux; it takes 8mb


3

A similar question has been answered at SuperUser. I also suggest you to check this page for more information about USB booting and partitions.


3

Using a graphical partition editor (Like Disk Utility on a Mac or GParted) simply make two FAT32 partitions and use the first one as your Windows-readable partition (as Windows only reads the first partition on a disk) and then use the second partition as your bootable startup disk (as the BIOS recognizes both partitions and knows which to boot from). ...


3

Some time ago I bought HP Compaq t5000 Thin Client (t5710 model (it was really cheap (about $100) on some auction portal)) and it is great for my needs. I'm using it as: VPN server ssh server for accessing my home network wake on lan for other devices from time to time as webserver battery charger for my mobile.. ;) CPU: pbm@lantea:~$ cat /proc/cpuinfo ...


3

If I understand correctly, you are using a live disk. Without mounting any harddrives (which is the default behavior on most live disks) everything you do is actaully just in memory (the whole directory structure you see is loaded from the disk when you've booted) and will be gone after a reboot. You can't write on the disk itself by default.


3

Get UNetbootin from your package manager/software-center if you're already running Linux: Open a terminal and type sudo apt-get install unetbootin for Debian and other Debian-based systems such as Ubuntu. - drop "sudo" if you are running as root. Type unetbootin in the terminal to launch. You can then use the second option to find and load onto the usb ...


3

You can try dd, like dd if=/path/to/slax.iso of=/dev/sdb bs=1M . Make sure to replace sdb with the actual USB stick.


3

It is certainly possible to roll your own version of this concept with Grub. However there are also tools that can make the process much easier. PenDriveLinux lists several tools. Of those I have had good luck with Yumi, which is Windows based, and MultiSystem which is Linux-based. The MultiSystem project website is in French, but PenDriveLinux has good ...


2

From reading several sources, it appears that earlier PPC Macs could not boot from USB. Fortunately, it appears your Mac is recent enough it likely is capable. I have seen two methods of doing so: Hold the Option (Alt) key while your machine is booting. Plug in your USB stick (while the computer is on). In System Preferences, find the Startup Disk option, ...


2

As of today I have successfully installed this distribution and can use it as if it were Arch :) Below is the simplest way to do so: Install Arch on the hard drive Remove everything in / (in the local disk), except for /boot Mount the root-image.sqfs image in the linuX-gamers live DVD and copy everything inside to / Repeat the previous step with the ...


2

I happen to like Mint as a base for a LiveUSB along with changes that I applied to the iso using Remastersys. This allows me to add additional packages along with patching the system to have all the latest fixes. I tend to remaster the iso every couple of weeks so I have a very up to date version that I keep with me. This is very useful so I can visit ...


2

There is a guide to do exactly this on this question: http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/665/installing-grub-2-on-a-usb-flash-drive as the first answer. It answers it perfectly (assuming that I know what you are asking) and allows you to have multiple isos on a usb stick, by installing grub.


2

Finally I found the problem is caused by syslinux.You must have the right version to work with grml2usb. The best bet is to execute the grml2usb from the live system boot from the ISO. It must work, or blame the grml team :)


2

I heartily recommend Puppy Linux in on of its many derivatives: I use it every day on my computers and found it will simply work, easily. Also it will fully load in RAM so you don't have to bother with drive speed. It has all what you ask and works on most hardware also where many other distro fail. Not recommended if you are scared to running always as ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible