Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

It was a real pain to get kali to dual boot with windows because the grub boot menu never gets installed, but i got it solved and was able to boot into boot kali and windows with the help of ubuntu live disk. Here is the tutorial with the video ...


0

Assuming the kernel is configured to support the frame buffer console, You can specify which fb driver to output the console on via fbcon in the kernel args. For example: fbcon=map:1 You can find out which fb driver values are available using: cat /proc/fb In GRUB 2, the fbcon parameter can be appended to GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX. For more information, ...


0

You might try adding -term xterm to the "setterm" line in your .profile So, for example, setterm -blength 0 goes to: setterm -term xterm -blength 0


0

It's not necessarily faster, as far as I know, but Lubuntu runs LXDE which is a lightweight desktop environment. See http://lubuntu.net/


0

If you have a disk large enough to handle such an image, it will also be large enough for you to install a Linux-based system onto. In which case, I'd suggest you simply swap disks and use the "other" to try out a Linux-based distribution. If you decide you want to revert you can just swap back the disks.


3

There is a utility, taskset, part of util-linux, for just this purpose. For example: taskset -c 0-15 script will run script and constrain it to use just CPUs with IDs 0 to 15. To check that your scripts are indeed constrained to run on the proper CPUs, you can look at the file /proc/<pid>/status: it will have entries named Cpus_allowed (a bitmap; ...


0

You should do ldd /lib64/libldap-2.4.so.2, check output for 'undefined references', find package which provides that undefined lib, find your repo, manually download the rpm which provides that lib, install it with rpm -i <missing>.rpm. Most probably your problem is due to bug in libldap or your manual intervention into packaging system. I happen to ...


1

For a large or a considerable range of ip's my recommendation for you is use ipset If want to block an entire country ip block you can use the geoip module for iptables.


0

Some time ago I used ferm and a custom and simple bash script to generate rulesets and insert it in the correct order vía "include" directive in ferm. If you want logging connections, etc... you can use ulog-mysql, and save specific data matched with a specific iptables rule in mysql and graph whatever you want from this point forward. Another possibility ...


0

In my opinion your best bet will be to use a configuration management tool like Puppet, Chef, CFEngine or Ansible so you can define your policies based on the host type and apply it to any new host.


1

The exact answer depends on your filesystem - but in short, your data is stored in blocks. Your filesystem's metadata contains pointers to those blocks. It's OK if those blocks aren't consecutive - if your pointers are to block 3,4,5,6 it's no different than if they point to 3,28,110,45. It's only the number of blocks that determines how much space is ...


0

You need kernel-devel package for this kernel: 2.6.32-042stab102.9 Try install vzkernel-devel. Also you can ask your VZ provider support about source of kernel they use.


1

If you are looking for a ``classical'' GUI based slides making tool. Aside of Libre Office(or Open Office), there is a new option coming in recent years, i.e., WPS Office, by Kingsoft. Essentially it both looks and works like MS Office. So most people won't have much problem transiting. But since you are a Keynote user, I am not totally sure how you like the ...


1

Had the same symptoms but not with a virtual machine. I've fixed it up. There was a problem with my SNAT setup and ip rule which didn't match. Run ip route, should have one line... default dev venet0 scope link Run ip rule, should have 3 lines... 0: from all lookup local 32766: from all lookup main 32767: from all lookup default


0

The issue I'm having is that I can get to the first screen and I tried all of the options but after the OS is loaded it goes to a black screen.. And the desktop never shows. I let it sit there all day and I still got nothing.. The tools I used to put Kali on a USB drive is called Rufus 1.4.1 I'm using an HP laptop running Windows 8 that was updated to ...


0

Install a display manager1. If it is not working or you already have one installed, then run dpkg-reconfigure <name of display manager>2 Select your display manager in the configuration screen and you should be good to go. Add auto eth0 to /etc/network/interfaces.3


2

Looks like you've removed your login manager. Install a login manager(i.e. SLiM) and append ifup eth0 to your .xinitrc file.


0

Edit your .bashrc file to include the following commands at the bottom of the script. startx ifup eth0 It may not be the most elegant but it'll fix your problem.


1

"ent" is an excellent command line tool for a simple and quick estimation of entropy. I've used it to help learn how linear congruential generators work. But if by "measuring entropy" you mean "measuring randomness"... the problem becomes more complex. For a more robust test of randomness you should checkout the dieharder test suite: ...


2

Well, first, what is an inode? In the Unix world, an inode is a kind of file entry. A filename in a directory is just a label (a link!) to an inode. An inode can be referenced in multiple locations (hardlinks!). -i bytes-per-inode (aka inode_ratio) For some unknown reason this parameter is sometime documented as bytes-per-inode and sometime as inode_ratio. ...


-1

mplayer -vo fbdev2:/dev/fb1 -xy 320 -zoom tv:// -tv device=/dev/video0


0

I'm guessing your old laptop has a Pentium M or Celeron M CPU? Try adding boot option forcepae at the grub menu when your live usb boots. More info here. If this doesn't work you might have more success with Lubuntu (or Ubuntu) 14.04.


0

If you can access the U-Boot command line console, you can enter printenv to see U-Boot's environment variables. Some of these variables define the commands that are run at boot time - beginning with bootcmd. Based on the output you've provided, it appears U-Boot is trying different load commands for different filesystems - for example, ext2load vs ...


3

This cannot work. The outside LAN does not know how to handle the IP of your RaspberryPi. (=how to route the packets to reach your RaspberryPi) go to http://www.whatismyip.com/ to find out your public IP. Note it down, but don't tell us. You will have to point to this IP if you want to reach your RaspberryPi. Which port to use you have to define in a port ...


1

It is caused by a KDE library adding custom MIME types. Fix it with: sudo mv /usr/share/mime/packages/kde.xml /usr/share/mime/packages/kde.xml.bak sudo update-mime-database /usr/share/mime


0

From the comments and your further investigations it looks like your devtoolset is modifying the PATH. Unfortunately that includes what appears to be an old or broken sudo command. It would be worth trying to modify the devtoolset include in your .bashrc like this, and then logging back in again: if [ "$(gcc -dumpversion)" != "4.7.2" ]; then scl enable ...


3

I'm assuming you are using a Debian/Ubuntu based system as they do not automatically remove older kernels, whereas Fedora and family do. List all your installed kernels with: dpkg -l | grep linux-image You'll get a list of all packages. Decide which ones you want to keep and remove the others: sudo apt-get autoremove linux-image-a.b.c linux-image-x.y.z ...


2

The fact that you: can't decompress the file then because it is not recognized as a gzip file indicates that this is not a quirk of the file command misdetecting the file format. The file is actually not valid or it is corrupt. If these files were generated with normal gzip with no errors reported and normal gunzip cannot then decompress them then ...


1

Use PROMPT_COMMAND. What you're trying to do is exactly what it's for. It's expanded before the prompt is evaluated. If you want to derive some of the prompt content from that code, set variables in PROMPT_COMMAND, turn on the promptvars variable, and include these variables in PS1. See Stateful bash function and Display Non-Zero Return Status in PS1 and ...


3

At the stage where you have a directory tree containing a file …/etc/shadow (before building the filesystem image), modify that file to inject the password hash(es) that you want to have. The easiest way to do that is with recent enough versions of the chpasswd tool from the Linux shadow utilities suite (Debian wheezy is recent enough) with the -R option. ...


0

Try to see if below script will do what you want while IFS="[ _]" read a b dir c file ; do echo mv -t ${dir^^} ${file}* ; done < index.file then remove echo.


0

If this in your metadata file: 12_12_myname1_abc GGG12345 means that you have to copy file GGG12345_abc.txt in directory MYNAME1 you can parse metadata file and copy files with awk: awk '{ x = split($1, arr, "_"); arr[3] = toupper(arr[3]); s = "mv " $2 "_" arr[4] ".txt " arr[3]; } { system(s); }' metadata You can first test it without using system to ...


1

lxdm is in Debian unstable, but not in Wheezy. You might be able to backport it, though. apt-cache policy lxdm lxdm: Installed: (none) Candidate: 0.5.0-3 Version table: 0.5.0-3 0 50 http://httpredir.debian.org/debian/ unstable/main amd64 Packages The build depends of lxdm are given as: apt-cache showsrc lxdm ... Build-Depends: ...


1

The disvantages of using nohup would be: No stdout messages. You will have to follow the nohup.out file to check everything your command is doing. This is the place where nohup will print things. It is an advantage depending on the point of view. No stderr output. You will have to manually redirect those messages. And these two are not drawbacks, but ...


2

By default on enterprise GNU/Linux and it's derivatives, the adduser command creates a user which is disabled until you explicitly specify a password for that user. Here is an example on CentOS 6.5, which should be the same as Scientific Linux. $ sudo adduser test $ sudo grep test /etc/shadow test:!!:123456:0:99999:7::: the reason for this is because ...


1

You could configure your SSH server to listen to both ports, and then use iptables to restrict access to port 22 to a single IP number. Something like the following (where x.x.x.x is the IP number you want to allow): iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -s x.x.x.x -j ACCEPT iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -j DROP


0

The PHP documentation sucks is very bad: vague, ambiguous, and misleading.  fileinode() is tersely defined as “gets file inode” or “returns the inode”.  But if you dig a little deeper, the documentation seems to start saying that this function returns the inode number.  An inode is more than an inode number.  The difference between “returning the inode of a ...


0

If you check the manual page of ssh by man ssh, you'll find the related syntax ssh [...] [-l login_name] [...] [user@]hostname [command] So when it parse your command, it will treat the first argument without flags to be the hostname, and what comes after it as a command passing to the remote for execution. Come back to your case. If you put your name ...


1

As said by others ssh user@ip is the correct sintax. If you use ssh ip user, the "user" part is actually a command to be executed on the remote host. When you suppress the user@ part from the correct sintax, you are actually passing your local user to the remote host. If you don't have a user with the same name, or it is a disabled user on the remote host ...


0

did you do a service iptables restart after adding it to the file? That file is just for the persistent configuration. If you want to make it active you have to restart the service.


6

The ssh user@ip is correct syntax. The other logs in to the host ip as you and tries to run a command called root. Please update your question with an explanation of what are you actually trying to achieve.


-1

You can try the -v option of iptables: iptables -L -v


0

For some odd reason /usr/bin/java was no longer pointing to the java installation. No idea how this happened. I confirmed this by running: $ sudo update-alternatives --config java Which gave me the following There is only one alternative in link group java (providing /usr/bin/java): /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-openjdk-amd64/jre/bin/java Nothing to configure. ...


0

I can suggest you a tool but I'm afraid it also has a web interface. It's called SeaLion. Even after knowing your apprehension for such tools I'm still suggesting you this tool because: The agent runs as an unprivileged user. All data transfer takes place over SSL connection. So this should address your security concern. The tool has a 'daily digest' ...


1

You can't use inode to check if a file has been changed. It may or may not change when a file is renamed, or moved. It will typically stay the same unless moved onto another disk ...


3

To set location of core dumps in Centos 6 you can edit /etc/sysctl.conf. For example if you want core dumps in /var/crash: kernel.core_pattern = /var/crash/core-%e-%s-%u-%g-%p-%t Where variables are: %e is the filename %g is the gid the process was running under %p is the pid of the process %s is the signal that caused the dump %t is the ...


0

The question/favor was clear enough. I can accept recommendations, but this is how I would do it. Run both commands as root, then leverage iptables-save. From 192.168.1.95 iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s 192.168.1.95 -p tcp --dport 9900 -j DNAT --to-destination 10.0.0.100:9900 From 10.0.0.100 iptables -t nat -A PREROUTING -s 10.0.0.100 -p tcp --dport ...


-2

For a regular file you can do: while [ -s /path/to/file ] && exec </path to file do dd bs=1k count=1 dd bs=1k of=/path/to/file done


2

yes, outside X-server, in tty, try command: cat /dev/urandom >/dev/fb0 if colourfull pixels fills the screen, then your setup is ok, and you can try playing with this small script: #!/usr/bin/env bash fbdev=/dev/fb0 ; width=1280 ; bpp=4 color="\x00\x00\xFF\x00" #red colored function pixel() { xx=$1 ; yy=$2 printf "$color" | dd bs=$bpp ...


-1

An inode used to be the on-disk structure that contained access permissions, ownership, size in bytes, and the disk block numbers of the disk blocks that contained a file's data. So, some metadata, and some data. The file's name was just an entry in a specially-marked file, called a "directory". The name was associated with the "inode number". ...



Top 50 recent answers are included