Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

where is a shell builtin command in csh where where where is a shell built-in the builtin is also available in zsh.


3

The only shells I know which has a builtin command called where is the tcsh and zsh. In the manual page of that shell (man tcsh / man zshbuiltins), you can find the definition: where command (+) Reports all known instances of command, including aliases, builtins and executables in path. Therefore it is the tcsh-equivalent of the ...


0

The linux command is called which. If you are used to in c-shells this might be a builtin. Bash builtins are documented through the bash builtin help. From Wikipedia:tcsh The built-in where command. Works like the which command but shows all locations of the target command in the directories specified in $PATH rather than only the one that will be used. ...


0

I am wondering if you are running your card with nouveau(open source drivers) or nvidia drivers? I guess you are running on open source! You should try to install the proprietary drivers (nvidia drivers) to see if it is really reading your card wrong. With nvidia-setting you should be able to see everything related to your GPU. This site should show you ...


0

Although minicom(1) and screen(1), as proposed by Marco d'Itri, will both work, neither one lets you talk directly to the serial port. Both of them implement their own VT100-style terminal emulation. Since both of them run inside terminals already, this means that they both interpret terminal emulation escape codes to maintain their idea of a virtual screen, ...


0

You either use the persistent names in /dev/disk/ or higher level software which interacts with udev using the libudev API.


0

The sensible way is to use a terminal emulator like minicom(1), which will allow you to easily configure the serial port parameters. Good old screen(1) will work as well, but you will have to manually configure the serial port parameters using stty(1): section 13.2 "Using Exec" of the manual explains how to do this.


0

I'm reposting Part of Another Answer here in hopes that it will help you, instead of telling you to use a VM... If doing this helps, I'll readd Part 2 with some explanation that fits here. BTW, these screenshots are from my Personal Laptop, that I used this method with to keep Windows Update from bonking my non-refind EFI, discussed in the question I asked ...


1

Why The Strange Naming ? Do you remember this Tidbit from the Handbook? Of particular importance is Handbook:AMD64/Networking/Introduction To get started configuring the network card, tell the Gentoo RC system about it. This is done by creating a symbolic link from net.lo to net.eth0 (or whatever the network interface name is on the system) in ...


1

Is /sbin/init owned by root, or by some other user instead ? Likely its owned by a non-root user, along with files like /bin/mount. Which means when they run (they have the SUID bit set) they run as non-root. Example below. See how mount and mount.steve have the same contents but mount.steve is owned by steve. So mount.steve fails with the "only root ...


0

You were correct, exp_internal -f passcheck-debug.log 1 pointed me to the problem of not having enough ptys. I added: close -i $spawn_id wait -nowait and it continued beyond that point. I had to add -nowait because if it doesn't have a spawn_id it will wait forever.


1

Bonding was exactly what I needed, so I adapted this answer. I can backup both interfaces and designate the ethernet interface as the primary one. In fact I didn't want a different address for each interface. I thought I had to do it with different ones but the solution with only one address and automatic backup is exactly what I wanted. (I also tested with ...


0

On a RedHat 7 system you can use the timedatectl utility: https://access.redhat.com/documentation/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/7/html/System_Administrators_Guide/chap-Configuring_the_Date_and_Time.html For example # timedatectl set-timezone Europe/Rome to set the system time zone (it manages the /etc/localtime symlink) # ls -l /etc/localtime ...


0

Try this: $ yum install --downloadonly --downloaddir=/pkgs/ `cat pkg_list` You can specify multiple package names on the yum command line. The only caveat here is that your command line may become too long for the shell. Thanks


0

There's also the cpuid utility - http://www.etallen.com/cpuid.html - available on a number of OS's.


1

If you've over-committed memory, a lot of tmpfs may be on disk. You may need to page stuff in to process the shutdown. mlock() is likely to force a lot of the other memory to disk. As you indicate you are diskless, you are likely reading over the network. Run sar gathering all stats while the server is shutting down. (sar may not be installed by ...


5

You could do something like: netns=myns find -L /proc/[1-9]*/task/*/ns/net -samefile /run/netns/"$netns" | cut -d/ -f5 Or with zsh: print -l /proc/[1-9]*/task/*/ns/net(e:'[ $REPLY -ef /run/netns/$netns ]'::h:h:t) It checks the inode of the file which the /proc/*/task/*/ns/net symlink points to agains those of the files bind-mounted by ip netns add in ...


0

You can try to follow this steps: Extract the archive: tar -xvzf log4cpp.tar.gz cd to created directory cd log4cpp Run configure: ./configure You can check various options if you run: ./configure --help. For example with option --prefix=/path/ you can change installation directories, by default make install will install all the files in /usr/local/bin ...


0

The numbering requested is ignored by dependency based meta init systems. you have the wrong provides!. The critical clue is from another script. lets take a look at umountroot: ### BEGIN INIT INFO # Provides: umountroot # Required-Start: # Required-Stop: # Should-Stop: halt reboot kexec # Default-Start: # Default-Stop: 0 6 # ...


0

shutdown scripts are numbered backwards so they will be run in reverse order, so you probably want 1 instead of 99. from some perspectives you could start services in runlevel 0 if you wanted to, but you don't really want to. (Although you could maybe run your script as a start, but I can't remember which gets run first start or stop scripts.) Since most ...


2

Here's a hypothetical situation which I consider might be plausible: The targeted machine is EFI. grub is either never installed on the target or has been utterly wiped from the system. it can only ever interfere and offers nothing of value otherwise. So what we might do in the above case is configure a boot option for a small installation/rescue ...


0

Use paman. With paman you can get a volume higher then 100% as in vlc.


1

The following solution is based on nothing but xxd (one of the tools mentioned in the question), Bash and GNU sed. It assumes that the input consists of complete bytes (groups of eight letters), arbitrarily separated by newlines. The approach is: Strip all newlines. Group letters into four-letter groups terminated by spaces. Filter these quadgraphs into ...


0

From Arch Linux: Currently we have official packages optimized for the i686 and x86-64 architectures https://www.archlinux.org/download/


0

Here is a how we can use same cookbook across multiple environments but pass different variables specific to environment! 1. create an env.rb with below content and upload it via knife command. name "dev" description "This is for Development Environment" cookbook "cookbook1", "= 0.1.0" default_attributes "dev" => { "proxy-server" => ...


1

I personally prefer using less to do this same thing. less your_file After starting less, the F command (not a command line flag) will begin to actively monitor the end of the file. While watching the end of the file in this mode CTRL-c will stop appending output to less and allow you to page around. Very handy.


0

A couple of things to consider re the following gawk script: Seeing that your input date does not show the century, you need to consider that format in realation to what date defaults to. The provided sample output shows a decimal time, but your description says seconds. The data is in seconds resolution, so this script outputs integer seconds ...


1

In a very simplistic way: you can look at all the pseudo-ttys in use and write to all of them. Use who to list all the current logins and their tty, eg: $ who me tty1 Jun 1 07:09 brian pts/0 Jun 1 07:15 (:pc1) john pts/1 Jun 1 07:15 (:pc88) sue pts/2 Jun 1 07:15 (:pc7) The 2nd column shows e.g. /dev/pts/0 ...


2

It stands for "Block Identification". 1* I general, using whatis can provide info about a command: whatis blkid A block (device) is a file that provides buffered access to hardware. E.g a hard-drive. Futher info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Device_file#Block_devices Each block device listed by blkid has a unique universal Identifier (UUID). blkid ...


3

You can try to use the wall program, but the logged in users may be able to override that and avoid seeing any wall messages. Alternately, you can attempt configure and use syslog to send a message from a given facility to the * location, which (in my experience) will show up on all logged in shells.


3

I see two options. One, he can use tail -f to see the log file as it's being written, or two, he can have the program start inside a screen (or similar) session to which he can (re-)attach later. If he doesn't know the location of the log file, he can use top, ps or a similar tool to find the process ID, then run lsof -p1234 where 1234 is the process id to ...


1

I would use device bonding, meaning you are creating a new virtual device for which you assign the network settings (e.g. IP address, mask, etc.) and then you enslave both the ethernet and wifi interfaces to that interface. Something like: $ sudo modprobe bonding $ sudo ifconfig bond0 192.168.0.1 netmask 255.255.0.0 $ sudo ifenslave bond0 eth0 wlan0 ...


-2

it is as simple as typing "ls | pbcopy" (without quotes). The downside is you can not paste it into a terminal window, it thinks you want to press enter after each filename pasted. But you can paste them into a document.


1

I'm not aware of a utility that will do this. However, you could have a fair stab at implementing your own using the /dev/vcs* devices. The man page for vcs gives an example program that not only writes to a terminal screen via /dev/vcsN but also sets attributes via /dev/vcsaN. A trivial demonstration can be seen with the following sample shell code. Note ...


1

Let me restate your question for clarity: You want to install a Linux distribution but you want to avoid needing to physically access the server. You cannot use alternatives such as the following: Dell's iDRAC or an equivalent from another vendor. These solutions provide out-of-band server management that works even when the server is not running any ...


-3

You can do it with: sed -e's/ testhost / testhost testhost1 testhost2 testhost3 /; s/ testhost$/ testhost testhost1 testhost2 testhost3/' /etc/hosts


0

It is common for the login code for the display manager to load and/or configure a number of modules for a number of services including sound when a user logs in. Starting in text mode, and using startX to get start the graphical interface bypasses this setup. Normally, there are text mode windows available using key combinations. This provides ready ...


0

I have accomplished something similar to what you are describing using 2 wifi interfaces and wired Ethernet concurrently. The wired Ethernet is connected to a test network. The 1st wifi adapter is configured as a AP using hostapd for initial configuration. The 2nd wifi adapter is connected to the local wifi network for access throughout the building. ...


0

As per my current understanding. No one (user space script) is actually calling modprobe\ insmod to get these CAN drivers inserted, this is because they are Platform Devices. This is identified by: The alias: platform: information from the modinfo command The source code for the c_can_platform which defines the c_can_plat_driver as a ...


3

Not sure of the purpose of for loop in your script which is not needed and does not serve any purpose. The following will work as you expected. find /var/backup/web2 -maxdepth 1 -type f -mtime +1 -delete


2

lsof(8) is probably your best option. Lesser options include ipcs(1), fuser(1), netstat(8), ps(1), and rummaging through /proc.


-1

You can try to delete /var/lock/LCK..ttyS4, using rm. As I understand, you need to unlock the device in a such way.


0

It looks like a different default being used for the "-z:mixmode,sum" (versus -z:mixmode,avg , see ecasound(1) man page). This would explain the difference you are seeing.


0

As it seems that the limitation is more on the user experience side (don't have to enter password again and again), the best choice here would be to enter your public key (the .pub file in your ~/.ssh folder) in the destinations ~/.ssh/authorized_keys file. Here the ~ folder stands for the home of the users that are involved on the source and destination ...


1

It depends upon the hardware connection between the disk drive and the computer. But if it is an USB 2, indeed it would be slow (whatever OS you use). The alternative could be to add a new hardware SATA drive, or to repartition your existing internal drive (to have some space for your Linux system). Perhaps you could repartition (& shrink the existing ...


3

Will I find drivers for my graphics card that will allow me to use it at full performance? It depends. Purely free software drivers like Nouveau might not be able to get all the performance from your hardware, but Nvidia has some proprietary driver for it. BTW, unless you are playing games (or code vector numerical applications for CUDA or OpenCL), ...


1

For popular software you will usually find other users who provide ready to use packages for your distro. Example: https://launchpad.net/~thomas-schiex/+archive/ubuntu/blender Anything you install should go through the package manager in any case, so you can keep track & get rid of its files in the future. If you just unpack a binary tarball somewhere ...


4

You can do it directly from the command line like this: ssh -A -t ubuntu@hostB ssh -A hostC Or by adding these lines to your "$HOME"/.ssh/config file and invoking ssh hostC in the normal manner: Host hostB User ubuntu Host hostC User ubuntu ProxyCommand ssh -q hostB nc -q0 %h %p In your scenario where hostB and hostC are ...


0

Another sed: sed -ne'h;s/.*//p;x;:n' -e'N;s/;.* //p;tn' -eD <in >out sed saves a copy of pattern space to hold space, s///ubstitutes away all of pattern space and prints the results, then exchanges hold and pattern spaces. This happens on each non-blank 1st field line, and gets the dividing blanks in output where appropriate. For every other line ...


0

I experienced similar behavior with Linux Mint 17.1. Icons were changed when I switched to NVIDIA card. I've found a solution here: Icons, controls themes don't work after clean install The solution is to remove ~/.config/monitors.xml file. I assume, that the problem is connected with using an external monitor. Not sure if this workaround work with ...



Top 50 recent answers are included