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4

Per your bonus question, add the following line below the rsync command in the shell script I provided below. I wrote this in the comment but I'll officially add it to my answer here: find /auto/std2/nat2/B -name '*.zip' -exec sh -c 'unzip -d `dirname {}` {}' ';' This will handle unzipping all the zip files that are copied via rsync from folder ...


3

On your local system, create a skeleton of what you want. For example, if you want to copy file foo to remote location /etc/foo, then you need to create an etc directory and then put foo into it. Then tar the skeleton. Now you can do this via cron as suggested by @Anthon in the comments to the question above. Step by step: On the remote host, create ...


3

You CPU is slow. A score of 760 for a dual core CPU is bad. If you take a look at the single-core performance for that CPU on the site it's on par with a good Pentium III. The GPU should be good enough for YouTube but together with the CPU it could be not enough. I can watch 760p YouTube in HTML5 on a Pentium M with a much slower AMD GPU. Be sure to have ...


3

There are many ways to skin that cat: If you want a graph of all data usage over a given period plus other summary statistics, the standard tools for that on Linux are MRTG and Cacti. Your ISP may offer a web API that lets Net Usage Item periodically check your usage and report it with a "fuel gauge" in the browser. It works in Firefox and Chrome. Pulling ...


3

Some things change while others do not. One of the main differences between the different Linux distributions is their software package management. For example, the Debian world (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint etc) use dpkg and apt-get while the Red Hat world (RHEL, CentOS, openSuSe etc) use rpm and others can use yet other tools. The basic ideas will be the same but ...


2

1) what is core file. It is a file that contains a core dump. Certain abnormal program terminations such as executing an illegal instruction cause a core dump to be generated by default. 2) where it is located. Usually it is a file called core in whatever was the current directory of the process that caused it to be generated, but in some ...


2

Consider using SystemTap. It is dynamic instrumenting engine that dynamically patches kernel so you can track any in-kernel event such as opening a socket. It is actively developed by RedHat so it is supported in CentOS. Installing To install SystemTap on CentOS 6: Enable debuginfo repository: sed -i 's/^enabled=0/enabled=1/' ...


2

You should explore a few distributions with at least the two main package types : A rpm-based (like RHEL, fedora, ...) A deb-base (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint,...) And the two main init : systemd (which is on pretty much every last versions of the main distributions) sysV, the legacy init you can still find on Debian 7 "Wheezy" , or RHEL 6 You should also ...


2

/dev/hda1 : No this is a partition /dev/bin/ : No this doesn't exist /dev/sda2 : No , this again is a partition /dev/hdx is used to represenet IDE devices So the correct answer is.... /dev/sda


2

There is an answer in Kernel documentation: 3.1.2 usbmouse ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ For embedded systems, for mice with broken HID descriptors and just any other use when the big usbhid wouldn't be a good choice, there is the usbmouse driver. It handles USB mice only. It uses a simpler HIDBP protocol. This also means the mice must support this simpler protocol. Not ...


2

There's not really any meaningful formula here; there's just arbitrary rules of thumb that get thrown around. E.g., "The perceived wisdom seems to be that for servers the ratio of Swap to RAM is lower than for PCs." Perhaps that assumes a gargantuan amount of RAM, as servers are more likely to have. But this is still mostly meaningless. It says ...


2

/dev/null is used by countless scripts, such a bug would have become apparent immediately after a kernel with that bug had booted. Perhaps it did once happen but I expect it was fixed the same day. I've been using Unix since 1983 (and Linux since 1992) and I've never heard of this.


2

Received a similar message to this a while ago. Discovered it was a hardware issue with how interrupts were passed from the PCI controller to PCI-Express controller (Intel PCI6466 chipset). Check deeper into the logs, look for: irq 43: nobody cared (try booting with the "irqpoll" option) There are several things that can cause this including incorrect ...


2

You could use what DevNull suggested which rsyncs periodically. Personally I would use inotify. It is a nifty tool that you can give a folder to watch. It sets up watches and notifies you whenever a filesystem change occurs. You could then trigger an rsync based on the trigger from inotify. For the specific case at the end you talk about, you can use the ...


1

Your cron seems not to know or use the &> shortings from bash. When you write the redirection like this /home/archiver/archiver.sh >/home/archiver/output 2>&1 it should work.I would prefer >>/home/archiver/output 2>&1 to always append to the logfile, too.


1

./configure runs a script named "configure" in the current directory. make runs the program "make" in your path, and make install runs it again with the argument "install". Generally, the "configure" script was generated by a collection of programs known as "autotools". It checks your system and tries to generate a makefile (see below) appropriate for your ...


1

I had a very similar issue with Kali and Windows 8.1. What did the trick for me was downloading bootrepair, setting it up as a bootable USB drive, booting into it and following the prompts. It reconfigured some things and now my system boots in GRUB letting me choose from Kali and Windows. Here is the bootrepair I used: ...


1

See in the bios USB mode and set in to Hard Drive (not auto)


1

The best resistance against corruption on a single SD card would be offered by BTRFS in RAID1 mode with automatic scrub run every predefined period of time. The benefits: retaining ability to RW to the filesystem modern, fully featured filesystem with very useful options for an RPi, like transparent compression and snapshots designed with flash memory in ...


1

For what it's worth, I recently went from the standard kernel in Ubunto 3.0.16 to the low latency kernel and the change to my desktop performance was phenomenal. It took some doing because the Nvidia driver included in the Ubuntu distribution would not load with the low-latency kernel however the exact same driver version from Nvidia's website worked fine. ...


1

Upgrade to Kernel 3.19. – I used the Ubuntu mainline kernel packages, which can be found here: http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.19-vivid/ (runs on Ubuntu 14.04 trusty as well) The following bug report comment mentioned it https://bugs.freedesktop.org/show_bug.cgi?id=45092#c37 ...and tracked down the commit with the following message: ...


1

Authentication logic is usually handled by PAM nowadays. My guess is you should be able to set this up in PAM's configuration files (in my case, in /etc/pam.d). Common authentication logic is stored in common-auth. In your case, I'm guessing you should have something like this: auth [success=2 default=ignore] pam_unix.so nullok_secure auth ...


1

Almost all problems with scripts properly running from the commandline, but not from cron come from the setting of the PATH variable. According to man 5 crontab for Vixie cron: On the Debian GNU/Linux system, cron supports the pam_env module, and loads the environment specified by /etc/environment and /etc/secu‐ rity/pam_env.conf. It ...


1

Because the distinction remains a little vague to me, this may not be a very clear answer. I'll just try to expose my point of view, more than actual, technical facts. First of all, it is probably relevant to note that Linux is a UNIX-like system. This means that while most concepts and implementations have been inspired, sometimes taken, from UNIX, there ...


1

I would say your source is false. There are many different operating systems called "UNIX", but in none of them are shells such "privileged" processes that they form the underlying layer for other userspace utilities. A shell is just another userspace process.


1

You are basically asking two separate questions. How to set permissions on your local system to mirror the production one? You need to know the server configuration - in this case it includes configuration of the http daemon (httpd aka Apache in this case) - usually found in /etc/httpd or /etc/apache). You also need to know with what credentials daemon ...


1

I think what you want to solve is the problem of your manual link local address going away. Just put it in the startup config script: # cat /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth | grep IPV6ADDR IPV6ADDR=fe80::1/64 if you already have an ipv6 entry then use the following parameter instead: IPV6ADDR_SECONDARIES=fe80::1/64 That will make it permanent. ...


1

My two cents is that you shouldn't put the file in one of the default system header paths - you should put it into whatever directory you want (/usr/local/libfoo_v1.0/include being a pretty common convention, with the library itself installed into /usr/local/libfoo_v1.0/lib) and then point the compiler to that directory with -I/usr/local/libfoo_v1.0/include ...


1

Implementing @Izkata's suggestion using inotifywait with paced event response to keep the rsyncs down to at most 1 every 5 minutes while still responding quickly to initial changes: #!/bin/sh # usage: whateveryouwanttotcallthis "$directorytowatch" rsync args here cd "$1" || { echo "${0##*/}: can't cd to $1"; exit 1; } shift rsync -nq "$@" || { echo "rsync ...



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