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17

It is because of NPTL. Since it is part of the GNU C library nearly every modern linux distribution don't uses the first two real time signals anymore. NPTL is an implementation of the POSIX Threads. NPTL makes internal use of the first two real-time signals. This part of the signal manpage is very interesting: The Linux kernel supports a range of 32 ...


15

There are several options to do so: You can use a terminal multiplexer like screen or tmux. In screen, for example, the shortcut Ctrl+a - a, has the same functiononality as Alt+Tab in graphical environments: switch to the last screen. Or you use vim's internal function. Type :!command in vim's command mode. For example: :!ls -l. After the command ...


10

Because the signals are: SIGWAITING 32 Ignore All LWPs blocked SIGLWP 33 Ignore Virtual Interprocessor Interrupt for Threads Library Neither of which are supported in Linux. (LWP stands for LightWeight Process) Source: IBM DeveloperWorks Solaris to Linux Porting Guide


6

In case you don't understand this, you have essentially destroyed your copies of /bin/sh and /bin/bash.  Boot from some other medium (e.g., an optical disc, another partition, or a USB device) and restore them from a backup (or distribution media) or the Internet.


4

When a process calls vfork, the parent remains in state D as long as the child hasn't executed _exit or execve (the only two authorized functions, together with execve's relatives like execvp, etc.). The parent is still executing the vfork call, so it's in state D. If the child does something like this (which is stupid, but valid), the parent will remain in ...


4

You can press Ctrl-z to stop vim and go to CLI, do whatever you need to (edit another vim file perhaps), then press fg on command line to return back into vim at the same place you left off at. If you didn't see the command fg being typed, then it's very likely that screen was being used.


4

To quote Robert Love: The scheduler does not magically know whether a process is interactive. It requires some heuristic that is capable of accurately reflecting whether a task is I/O-bound or processor-bound. The most indicative metric is how long the task sleeps. If a task spends most of its time asleep it is I/O-bound. If a task spends more ...


3

I don't know about the "suddenly returned ..." part, but the first bit is fairly trivial. The :shell command opens your shell. For me, it opens at wherever I was when I opened vim, so it is inheriting settings from vim, as G-Man notes. That gives you the CLI mode. You can also open another vim from it. Quitting this shell returns you to wherever you where in ...


3

Using bash: for file in *; do [[ -f "$file" ]] && mv "$file" "${file/a_LT/LT_A}"; done data_LT_A.coo data_LT_A.ec data_LT_A.fits data_LT_A.grp


3

If you're new, gparted is probably your friend as it's quite user-friendly for both the above options. Use it to create three partitions on /dev/xvdc of the required size for your partioning scheme. Once installed, run it as root: gparted /dev/xvdc Make sure you create the filesystems as well as the partitions. Use ext4 for the partition filesystems - ...


3

Your system is using intel_pstate driver. There are only two governors available when using this driver: powersave and performance. The userspace governor is only available with the older acpi-cpufreq driver (which will be automatically used if you disable intel_pstate at boot time; you then set the governor/frequency with cpupower): disable the current ...


3

You need to inform the r8712u module about your hardware. Try: $ echo 'install r8712u /sbin/modprobe --ignore-install r8712u; \ /bin/echo "0df6 005d" > /sys/bus/usb/drivers/r8712u/new_id' | \ sudo tee /etc/modprobe.d/r8712u.conf and load the module with: $ sudo modprobe r8712u Additionally, you probably need to install some RTL firmware ...


3

I'm never quite sure if spelunking in sysfs is the best way to do things (am I supposed to use udevadm?), but at least it's discoverable $ DEV=p8p1 $ readlink /sys/class/net/$DEV/device/driver ../../../../bus/pci/drivers/tg3 It won't work for devices like lo which are "virtual" (/sys/devices/virtual/). They don't have the link to an underlying device ...


3

Look at /proc/<pid>/root. This is a symbolic link to the process's root directory. If it doesn't link to /, the process is in a chroot jail.


2

You can use lsblk to list all block devices, along with whether or not each device is read only. You can then use grep and awk to print the names of block devices that are not read only: lsblk -d -n -oNAME,RO | grep '0$' | awk {'print $1'}


2

To address the "DirectMap" issue: the kernel has a linear ("direct") mapping of physical memory, separate from the virtual mappings allocated to each user process. The kernel uses the largest possible pages for this mapping to cut down on TLB pressure. DirectMap1G is visible if your CPU supports 1Gb pages (Barcelona onwards; some virtual environments ...


2

I don't know exactly which distro you need. But in Ubuntu you seek for Details in Dashboard and you'll find your CPU (with amount of logical processors & clock rate per physical core), GPU (only the name, not the memory) and amount of RAM. So far for rest, I don't know. onesysadmin (on ServerFault), says: $ cat /proc/cpuinfo for CPU $ free $ cat ...


2

I can't help with the buildroot specific stuff (other than to say that you'd have to either mount it or boot it before removing duplicates, and then creating a new rootfs from the resulting filesystem), but removing duplicates is quite possible. A naive approach would be to find / -type f -exec sha256sum {} + | sort > checksums.txt, read the resulting ...


2

If rename is available use this command: rename 's/a_LT/LT_A/' * Another approach with awk: find -type f | awk -F'a_LT' '{printf "mv \"%s\" \"%sLT_A%s\"\n", $0, $1, $2}' | bash


2

OK The solution to this problem was to upgrade the kernel from 3.13 to 3.14. Many thanks to @garethTheRed for leading me to this solution. wget http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v3.14.1-trusty/linux-headers-3.14.1-031401_3.14.1-031401.201404141220_all.deb wget ...


2

I'm used to using xargs: ls -1 | sed 's/\(\(.*\)a_LT\(.*\)\)/\1 \2LT_A\3/' | xargs -n 2 mv


1

This answer assumes that you can connect your machine to the network using a cable and so get internet access. If that assumption is wrong, let me know and I'll modify this. You need to install the driver for your wireless card. The driver support table of the Linux Wireless page lists it as supported so you should be able to get everything working by ...


1

Mounting a HDD To mount a HDD that's physically connected to your system, you first need to identify the device handle that's been assigned to it. I typically use the command line tools blkid or lsblk to find out this information. blkid $ sudo blkid /dev/sda1: UUID="XXXXXX" TYPE="ext4" /dev/sda2: UUID="XXXXXX" TYPE="LVM2_member" ...


1

ls /boot ls / … however you might want to expand upon your question, as Debian / SSD drive / live CD are (more or less) irrelevant to listing directory contents. Maybe you're asking where the boot and root partitions from a live CD are mounted, e.g. /mnt/gentoo and /mnt/gentoo/boot?.


1

You can try: setxkbmap -layout us to get a clean start if things are wrong now. You can also save the state of a (still correct) mapping with xmodmap -pke > filename and use filename as input for everything to reset. BTW: keycode 108 = Mode_switch keysym 5 = 5 percent EuroSign should give you the € sign on Right-Alt+5


1

Short answer: You can't. work around: change twice, e.g. old passwd is Bilbo1, change to Frodo1 (from Bilbo1), then change to Bilbo2 (from Frodo1). why two changes ? on the first change, Linux can only compare clear text Bilbo1 and Frodo1, on second Linux can only compare Frodo1 and Bilbo2 (and all the crypted passwd, you can't revert to ...


1

I don't see how static libraries enter into the mix. Static libraries are not present on the target root filesystem with Buildroot. Generally speaking, Buildroot tries to install only what's necessary on the target, and I honestly doubt you will find many duplicated files there.


1

Are you really sure that arch-root is on a separate filesystem that can be mounted and umounted? pivot_root, as well as the more current switch_root, works by juggling information about mounted filesystems in the kernel. The new root file system must be "the root" of a file system, you cannot pass "." as the new root unless "." is the root directory of a ...


1

From the man page, I believe this is your issue: The following restrictions apply to new_root and put_old: - They must be directories. - new_root and put_old must not be on the same file system as the current root. - put_old must be underneath new_root, that is, adding a nonzero number of /.. to the string pointed to by put_old must yield the same ...



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