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16

Yes and no. *nix has a huge advantage over Windows in package management. Unlike in Windows where you must rely on third-party packages to have sane (un)installers, *nix distributions offer package managers that take care of installation and uninstallation in a unified manner. As a result, when you remove a package, all the system-level files for that ...


10

This should work: echo 'set bell-style none' > ~/.inputrc Once that's done, open a new terminal and test it. Source


7

What you're experiencing is often referred to as the "audible bell." There are probably many ways to disable this (often annoying) feature. Perhaps the simplest is to blacklist the pcspkr module. Create a new modprobe.d configuration file either blacklisting it (will not load on-boot, but can be loaded at a later time): # echo "blacklist pcspkr" > ...


6

Uninstalling packages in Linux may leave behind configuration files. This shouldn't be observable normal usage, unless you reinstall the same package you removed: the configuration files are usually small and not used by any other package than the ones you installed. There is usually an option in the package manager to remove configuration files when ...


3

Try: find ./ -name "configuration.php" -exec grep db_userXYZ /dev/null {} + POSIX defined find -exec utility_name [argument ...] {} +: If the primary expression is punctuated by a plus sign, the primary shall always evaluate as true, and the pathnames for which the primary is evaluated shall be aggregated into sets. The utility utility_name ...


3

I've never tried with these specific RAID technologies but it's been my experience that it's best to operate at the filesystem level when attempting to migrate data from one physical implementation of RAID to another. What do I mean by this? I mean that I would get another set of disks and move my content from the 1st RAID to a intermediate location (some ...


3

As always it depends... Typically when I install Debian I start with a minimal installation and add to that what I need and want to run. Anything that gets started automatically then is supposed to be running. You may have installed and enabled (much) more than YOU need, but randomly killing things is the wrong way to reduce any potential overhead. Check ...


3

Yep, your processor does a NOP (No Op) or HLT Linux uses an idle process. This task does nothing but sends HLT and makes the CPU use less power and heat while there is nothing to do. Then when there is work to be done the CPU "comes back on" and does work. Now, keep in mind that the Linux scheduler will do "any work it can" before that point. This HLTing ...


3

Make a strace of tail -f, it explains everything. The interesting part: 13791 fstat(3, {st_mode=S_IFREG|0644, st_size=139, ...}) = 0 13791 fstatfs(3, {...}) = 0 13791 inotify_init() = 4 13791 inotify_add_watch(4, "/path/to/file", IN_MODIFY|IN_ATTRIB|IN_DELETE_SELF|IN_MOVE_SELF) = 1 13791 fstat(3, {st_mode=S_IFREG|0644, st_size=139, ...}) ...


2

I am going to mention on how to parse the information on free command. To find the percentage, you can use as suggested in the other 2 answers. This is clearly explained here. I would try to explain from what I have in my system. free -m total used free shared buffers cached Mem: 7869 4402 3466 ...


2

Here is sample output from free: % free total used free shared buffers cached Mem: 24683904 20746840 3937064 254920 1072508 13894892 -/+ buffers/cache: 5779440 18904464 Swap: 4194236 136 4194100 To parse this, the first line of numbers (Mem:) lists total memory, used and free ...


2

Whenever you change the /etc/shadow file with the vipw or similar command, it saves the previous copy as /etc/shadow- . This is not a backup. It's simply an instant-mistake fixer.


2

Early on in the days of Unix one had to be a member of wheel in order to su to root. Used as an additional layer of protection for the system. I don't know of any special significance now, it is just a legacy like the uucp and dialout groups.


2

The reason is probably that exec is the opposite of noexec, and it is noexec that is listed. Thus if noexec is absent, the user knows that exec is in effect. This is similar to dev / nodev. It seems that the exception is rw, which is listed even though it is in the default list. Note: while the mount(8) man page says that defaults is a fixed list of default ...


2

It is possible, yes. You need to pass init=/bin/sh to the kernel and you need to remember that the rootfs is most probably mounted ro afterwards. To directly run your program you need to tell the kernel to invoke it after configuring the hardware, but note that the normal userspace won't be available to your program.


2

Most Linuxes out there run /etc/rc.local once at system boot-up. Open this file with an editor and add the command to start your application. No need to prefix sudo to the command as the script is run as root. Be sure to add a '&` (ampersand) at the end of the command to run it in the background so it doesn't hold up your system from booting in case ...


1

By default if you dont specify address to Apache Listen parameter, it handles ipv6 address using IPv4-mapped IPv6 addresses. You can take a look in Apache ipv6 The output of netstat doesn't mean Apache is not listening on IPv4 address. It's a IPv4-mapped IPv6 address.


1

I'm in doubt about 10.132.168.0.3's routing table: default 192.168.0.1 0.0.0.0 UG 1024 0 0 eno1 192.168.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 eno1 192.168.0.0 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.0 U 0 0 0 enp0s20u4 If host is not a router I prefer that routing table has only two rows ...


1

effective permissions are formed by ANDing the actual (real?) permissions with the mask.  Since the mask of your file is rw-, all the effective permissions have the x bit turned off.


1

You can add more paths by basically adding another configuration file to /etc/ld.so.conf.d containing the directory paths of your new locations and then either rebuild the cache or reboot. Or you can probably use the /sbin/ldconfig command and do the manipulations that way.


1

Is it possible to install Linux on an old pc I have that is already running Windows XP? Yes, but if the PC is older you might want a lightweight Linux distribution. Anything reasonably recent should run Ubuntu or Debian fine. Can I download a distribution from a website or do I have to pay for a copy? You can download distributions, at e.g. ...


1

Though a duplicate as pointed by @szboardstretcher , my preference from the solutions (in the original question) is the one below, specially since you want to parse to a webpage. $ free | awk '/Mem/{printf("used: %.2f%"), $3/$2*100} /buffers\/cache/{printf(", buffers: %.2f%"), $4/($3+$4)*100} /Swap/{printf(", swap: %.2f%"), $3/$2*100}' Output: used: ...


1

It is retained as a copy of /etc/shadow and created upon changes. Nothing to configure there.


1

The list you're looking for is most probably at http://www.oid-info.com/ Yes, this is some kind of standard: OIDs are objects in the MIB, the global root MIB was defined in RFC 1155. It has since been extended, the SNMP MIB is RFC 1157.


1

To specify the ip address 1.1.*, you would use 1.1.0.0/16. This notation is used for CIDR (classless inter-domain routing) and is the standard method used to specify blocks of addresses. The /16 indicates the network includes all of the lower 16 bits of the address, so it matches in this case the address block from 1.1.0.0 to 1.1.255.255.


1

Some probably are. A few might not be. If you check ps fxa, you'll see a lot of them are children of [kthreadd] and have names also in brackets. Those you can mostly ignore (they're part of the Linux kernel). Other than those, you'll have to research each individually. Some (e.g., init) are critical. Others are critical depending on how you use the server ...


1

Files in /proc are generated by the kernel, not by the mount utility. The kernel omits options that are in their default kernel setting. The defaults of the mount utility don't always match the kernel defaults. You can check the defaults for your kernel version in the source code, in fs/proc_namespace.c. For example, as of version 3.15, noexec is displayed ...


1

man mount has a good list. But induvidual filesystem can define their own flags -> there is a separate list for every filesystem. But there are common flags and they are listed on the mount manpage. exec is a default flag. The list of the defaults mount flags are also in the man mount (AFAIK in the kernel sys_mount() syscall there is no such thing). But if ...


1

Installation of ruby can be easily done using curl: curl -sSL https://get.rvm.io | bash and is listed in the main rvm site here. After this operation is complete type rvm in the command line to check if it installed properly and if it did, it lists out its usage and other things. Ruby is usually pre-installed in most linux ditributions. To check ...


1

If api version is 0.4, and it is incompatible with other 0.* versions then you should set soname to libfoo.so.0.4. Actually soname can be any string, it is only needed to find proper shared library in your system when loading executable. Many packages (or distros) follow naming scheme different from yours. For example libfoo version 0.4.2 with api 0.4 would ...



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