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4

Directories are special in the sense that within a directory you can have references to several files and directories, so, if you remove the parent directory, all those files lose their reference point from where they can be accessed, the same with process. For such cases, rmdir() have different checks, that are different from unlink(): If the directory is ...


3

If you want to map new keys as modifiers (like Shift, Ctrl, Alt), using keycode with xmodmap is not sufficient. You need to do something like: keycode 87 = Shift_L clear shift add shift = Shift_L keycode 88 = Alt_L clear mod1 add mod1 = Alt_L keycode 89 = Control_L clear control add control = Control_L You have some examples in the xmodmap(1) man page. ...


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That IP is likely inside a NAT block which VirtualBox has set up. You need to either bridge or forward if you want to access the machine's ports from outside; you can do both from the virtual machine settings panel.


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Use read -e: $ read -e -n 5 13acX read -e means that: Readline (see Command Line Editing) is used to obtain the line. When you do that, you can edit the input in any of the ways you would when writing at the regular shell prompt, including backspace, Home, and so on.


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Linux has a mechanism that allows plug-ins to be registered so that the kernel calls an interpreter program when instructed to execute a file: binfmt_misc. Simplifying a bit, when an executable file is executed, the kernel reads the first few bytes and goes like this: Does it start with the four bytes \x7fELF followed by a valid-looking ELF header? If so, ...


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I think the best way to find out what drains your battery is the powertop utility. Powertop will give you a list of the energy consumption of your devices and will show you whether powersaving is enabled or not (and allows you to toggle these settings). The laptop-mode-tools package (at least that's how it is called in Debian/Ubuntu) can also be helpful in ...


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Boot into single user mode by going into the Grab menu and selected with the kernel version and press e to edit press space and type single


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As suggested above, there are a few ways to achieve this. I would use awk as follow last | awk '$1 ~ /root/ && /logged/{print $3 | "uniq" ;}' Or last | awk '$1 ~ /root/ && /logged/{a[$3]++}END{ for (i in a) print i}'


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So, you want a list of current remote logins with the user root. The command w lists all the logins on a system. So you can manipulate the output using grep or something else. This will provide you the current remote logins of root with IP address and also the local logins. w -s root Using grep with that output, to achieve the output you require:- w -s ...



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