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2

In order to run a program, it must be in RAM. During thrashing, all programs get swapped out of RAM and then have to be swapped in again before they can run. Additionally, for many (but not all) input events, there must be a round trip between your X11 server and your window manager, and the window manager may try to trigger additional events. And since you ...


1

If you use the same compilation options as Ubuntu, and you also install the corresponding modules, and you regenerate the initramfs, this will work. Get Ubuntu's configuration file, put it in the kernel compilation directory, and run make oldconfig. It would be less error-prone to Ubuntu's own compilation process. Get the kernel source package, substitute ...


0

Linux x86 cannot be easily back-ported to the 80286 because it is a 16-bit processor and Linux x86 requires a 32-bit processor. More specifically, the registers on the 286 were still only 16-bits wide. None of the EX registers were available. Also, memory segments and offsets were still only 16-bits long. Programs still had to deal with near/far code and ...


4

linux-image-amd64 is a generic metapackage, which depends on the specific default kernel package. In your particular case, linux-image-amd64 probably depends on linux-image-3.16-2-amd64. In general is suffices to install the generic metapackage. You could alternatively install the specific linux-image-3.16-2-amd64 package, but in general it is better style ...


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You can take a look at how facter does it here. As Jan said, lsb_release is probably the best way to go, but it cannot be your only way. For example, lsb_release is not present by default on any of my RHEL servers: [damaya@damaya-sandbox script]$ lsb_release -bash: lsb_release: command not found [damaya@damaya-sandbox script]$ yum provides "*/lsb_release" ...


1

Most programs and scripts I've seen parse the usual files in /etc, AFAIK there's no other way: On Redhat, look for /etc/redhat-release On Debian, look for /etc/debian_version Mandriva has /etc/version and Slackware has /etc/slackware-version You could also use uname to get the ARCH or, probably the most sane way, use lsb_release.


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There are no bfq or bfs patches applied to the Fedora kernels unfortunately (esp. in the case of bfq). So there is no way to enable those features by adding kernel args. Further, there is no trusted Fedora repository that has kernels with those features enabled. It seems that until bfq becomes part of mainline you will have to keep creating the kernels ...


1

P states on x86 processors are levels of voltage scaling. When a processor runs at higher voltage, it can run faster, but it also uses more energy and heats more. The P state numbering is standardized: 0 to 15, from fastest to slowest. It is up to the kernel to decide when to switch between P states. The kernel will switch to a lower-numbered (faster, ...


2

getting the kernel source Clone the stable kernel tree: git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git Change into it: cd linux-stable Checkout a tag where the bug is fixed: git checkout v3.15 You know the file you're after drivers/leds/led-core.c and where the bug is fixed (3.15) and broken (3.12) so there are a few ...


7

Because those programs are build to use things defined in the kernel headers: busybox-1.22.1]$ egrep -RHn '^#include <linux' modutils/modutils-24.c:194:#include <linux/elf-em.h> include/fix_u32.h:17:#include <linux/types.h> libbb/loop.c:11:#include <linux/version.h> console-tools/openvt.c:23:#include <linux/vt.h> ...


3

You should get the source code for the kernel, patch that and recompile. Changing a compiled binary is extremely difficult to do by hand and errors are easy to make.


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You can change that with setterm -blank X (X is the number of minutes). From man setterm: -blank [0-60|force|poke] (virtual consoles only) Sets the interval of inactivity, in minutes, after which the screen will be automatically blanked (using APM if available). Without an argument, gets the blank status (returns which vt ...


1

As mentioned in the comments, you should be using the Iproute2 utility ip, and not ifconfig. ifconfig has been deprecated in Linux for several years now, and is missing a lot of functionality. The specific bit of functionality affecting your case is the ability to add multiple IP addresses to a single interface (without creating interface aliases). The ...


1

CONFIG_EFI_MIXED might be what you need.


4

According to the documentation, parameters for modules which are built into the kernel need to be specified on the kernel command line with a module name prefix. In this case add snd_hda_intel.enable=0,1 to your kernel boot line. You can check the value of the param with: cat /sys/module/snd_hda_intel/parameters/enable Some parameters can be set by ...


0

I haven't found a perfect answer to this problem but you can obtain usable space using the following #!/bin/sh # echo "Re-establishing and defragmenting hugepages " sysctl -p hugeadm --pool-pages-min=DEFAULT:+[page-count] –add-temp-swap=400 echo “ “ echo “Updated hugepages “ cat /proc/meminfo |grep HugePage This will consolidate the reserved pages into ...


1

From: https://www.kernel.org/doc/Documentation/filesystems/ext4.txt commit=nrsec (*) Ext4 can be told to sync all its data and metadata every 'nrsec' seconds. The default value is 5 seconds. This means that if you lose your power, you will lose as much as the latest 5 seconds of work (your ...


21

It sounds like you've got a decent grasp on what happened. Yes, because you hard-powered-off the system before your changes were committed to disk, they were there when you booted back up. The system caches all writes before flushing them out to disk. There are several options which control this behavior, all located at /proc/sys/vm/dirty_* [kernel doc]. ...


1

I have the same question, but I'm using Ubuntu Trusty 14.04. It worked doing apt-get install qemu-utils


0

If the system is completely borked, then there is no guarantee that the error could be written to disk. But since the screen locks too, it seems possible that the error is X-related. X still has its own log files, so start by looking in /var/log/Xorg.0.log.old (or perhaps one of the other /var/log/Xorg.* files) after a crash.



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