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"hung tasks" are bugs that cause the kernel to leave a task stuck in uninterruptible "D" state. A task/process in that state cannot be killed, neither with kill -9. Your message in /var/log/messages means that the task 4123, obviously the mysql daemon is in that state since 120 seconds. That means the mysql daemon waits for ressources. Mostly the "D" state ...


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echo 0 > /proc/sys/kernel/hung_task_timeout_secs only silences the warning. Besides that it has no effect whatsoever. Any value above zero will cause this message to be issued whenever a task is blocked for that amount of time. The warning is given to indicate a problem with the system. In my experience it means that the process is blocked in kernel ...


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I don't know why this version is no longer in the kernel.org FTP archives, but you can pull it from git: $ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git $ cd linux-stable $ git checkout -f v2.6.26.5 $ head -4 Makefile VERSION = 2 PATCHLEVEL = 6 SUBLEVEL = 26 EXTRAVERSION = .5 I needed the -f option in the checkout ...


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i had not provided the correct port for the memory card. i had to edit the script.fex and generate another script.bin and the system booted successful. different boards have different ports. My board was an ITEAD AW2041. and it previous hanged at the same point awaiting on the mmcblk0p2


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When yum insists there are no packages to be updated, check if kernel is not excluded from updates: In /etc/yum.conf, there is usually a line similar to exclude=kernel* You need to remove kernel from the list or, if it is the only entry in the exclude list, remove the line completely or comment it out using #. Then, yum update (or yum update kernel) ...


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You need to query the current kernel RPM package to see which kernel is installed rpm -qa| grep kernel-2.6.32-431 If a new RPM is available install it, and then reboot your OS and check loaded kernel as below: uname -r


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Did you try rebooting the system, and then trying installing the kernel update again? If that doesn't work, this could be a bug unless it actually requires 373 MB to install the kernel. yum install yum-utils<br> package-cleanup --oldkernels --count=2 Second command of package-cleanup would leave latest 2 kernels in the server. It says 30 more MB ...


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patches-3.10.10-rt7.tar.bz2 is a tar file containing a lot of patches as individual files. You can't just feed that to the patch command and have it do the right thing. If you get the patch-3.10.10-rt7.patch.bz2 file it should work using the command you've shown.


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I had the same problem. I've used buildroot to build the filesystem, to compile the kernel and to add extra packages with busybox. I was only able to ping an ip address. With url the ping command returned: bad address error. Then I changed the resolv.conf file. sudo vim /etc/resolv.conf nameserver gateway_ip_address nameserver 8.8.8.8 nameserver 8.8.4.4 ...


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Presumably they do it for technical reasons like everyone else. Here's the output of grep -R Microsoft . | grep -i "(c)" run in the 3.13.3 source tree: ./tools/hv/hv_vss_daemon.c: * Copyright (C) 2013, Microsoft, Inc. ./drivers/net/hyperv/hyperv_net.h: * Copyright (c) 2011, Microsoft Corporation. ./drivers/net/hyperv/rndis_filter.c: * Copyright (c) 2009, ...


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I think what you really want to do, from your comment "My end goal is to boot a virtual machine with the kernel I build", is Boot a virtual machine (VM) with the current Ubuntu 14.04 ISO Install Ubuntu to a virtual hard drive in the VM Build/install the new kernel in the VM Then if you really wanted, you could create a live iso from the now-updated ...


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I'll assume your question is asking about the nature of the kernel, and why it would need recompiled. The Linux kernel is a whole bunch of source code written in C. There is code available to handle an unbelievably huge number of computer hardware devices and chip sets, and more code that helps it adapt to different platforms other than the standard PC ...


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You can find the Answer here: http://unix.stackexchange.com/a/177647/83339 if you are already on Debian you can follow the steps without need to boot from live CD


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Up to date instructions for building out-of-tree kernel modules are here. Installing the kernel config headers to the system include directory is not part of the procedure. Rather you invoke make from inside the kernel source tree and point it to the module's source tree with the M= parameter. FlashCam hasn't been updated in a while so it may not be ...


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Recommended Books for the Uninitialized void *i "Men do not understand books until they have a certain amount of life, or at any rate no man understands a deep book, until he has seen and lived at least part of its contents". –Ezra Pound A journey of a thousand code-miles must begin with a single step. If you are in confusion about which of the ...


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The easy way is to install grub-customizer tool: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:danielrichter2007/grub-customizer sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install grub-customizer When Grub Customizer starts up, you’ll see a list of all the items that show up in the boot menu. To hide entries that you don’t want to see anymore, simply uncheck the checkbox next to ...



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