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0

I solved it by changing my version from x86_64 to i686 In the installation menu, there are two choices one for x86_64 and one for i686. My problem was with x86_64 but when I reinstalled it choosing i686, it worked fine. The CMOS problem was solved by changing the CMOS battery.


0

package-cleanup --oldkernels --count=1 delete all kernels except latest.


0

According to top, it's been 2days, 1hr and 46min since the last change (I made change, rebooted and launched top command). Its been running everything from virtualbox (installing and running Linux guest) to vmware workstation (running windows and Linux mint guest and installing more Linux guest), timeshift, multiple browsers (chrome, firefox with many tabs), ...


1

If your embedded device uses U-boot, the kernel image might be written on a particular partition on a NAND flash. See this! If this is the case i think you can locate the binary by looking at your U-boot source code if you have access to it. You can also check the environment variable for clues. This will vary greatly depending on your system so I can't ...


0

I agree with Bruce, first, the easiest - by no means the fastest way is to reinstall the NVidia drivers. Assuming you're running Mint sudo apt-get remove --purge nvidia* Then whereis nvidia If any files still appear, delete them. Then reinstall the nvidia drivers To check for memory problems: Remove all but one stick, reboot and let the computer run. ...


1

This could be ganged-mode RAM operation (see here: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/278881-30-what-ganged-unganged-mode). Check in your BIOS that the memory slots are properly detected and not ganged. dmidecode or dmidecode -t shows you how Fedora sees the RAM.


4

The Linux kernel's system call interfaces are very stable. But the kernel has other interfaces that aren't always compatible. /proc is mostly stable, but there have been a few changes in the past (e.g. some interfaces moving to /sys some time after /sys was created). A number of device-related interfaces have been removed in the past. /sys contains some ...


0

More conservative distributions follow (and actively participate in) the stable kernel versions, for stability's sake. More adventurous ones use a kernel one version or so behind latest&greatest vanilla, plus a spattering of patches backported from the development tip (and some home-grown ones). Current kernel development policy is that Linus' version ...


0

It is because the file does not exists. The perf is part of linux-tools package as far as I know. You should be able to install it by traditional way apt-get install linux-tools from standard sources. If not, post what happened when you tried and what kernel version are you using.


9

I'm not working for a distribution, but I can think of at least two reasons: Some distributions apply their custom patches to the Kernel which are not merged into mainline yet. This means for every update of the Kernel they need to ensure that their patches don't break anything and still function properly. Even the latest stable Kernel release can contain ...


1

I filter the output with awk, using the fact the pid 2 is the parent of all kernel threads: ps -fHuroot | awk '$3!=2' This prints only lines where the third field (PPID) is not 2.


0

And it seems the answer is yes: opening a block device with O_DIRECT will bypass the page cache as well. I found the answer in this relatively old documentation for Oracle on Redhat 5. By default, reading and writing to block devices are buffered I/Os. Oracle Database 10g R2 now automatically opens all block devices such as SCSI disks using the O_DIRECT ...


3

ps output can be filtered in may ways. To see your processes, you could filter by the user/uid. relevant man page below -- U userlist Select by effective user ID (EUID) or name. This selects the processes whose effective user name or ID is in userlist. The effective user ID describes the user whose file access ...


0

You'd have to look up the devices listed for the machine against a list of devices supported by RHEL. Yes, there might be ones that happen to work but nobody has bothered to check/certify they work. Be careful, sometimes devices with similar names (e.g. some Ethernet card called like SC-423+ was a completely different beast than the superficially identical ...


-1

You could try Solaris File Events Notification. One approach shown here. Requires at least Solaris v11 though.


-2

You may use while loop... for (( ; ; )) do cp -f /source/*.txt /destination >> /dev/null sleep 2 done Used /dev/null to avoid displaying errors.


4

You can use rsync linux utility. You need to specify source and destination,it works locally as well as remotely. Please check man rsync for more details. For solaris, you'll need to install it.


2

I was invoking this make command from another makefile, which means I should export the variables in such case. The following post explains this topic in detail http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2826029/passing-additional-variables-from-command-line-to-make


0

It probably moves on, actually, but you don't see anything because the kernel's messages are not enabled. This happens when the boot loader passes the option quiet to the kernel. Please try booting your system again, but without that option. If you're using grub as the boot loader, this is done as follows: when you reach the grub menu, select the option ...


1

The message appears in case that certain process (in this case sftp-server) doesn't get CPU for 120s (default limit). This could be caused by high load on the system. Generally this could be caused waiting on any resource, most likely candidates are CPU, disk and network. When debugging such problems you can test writing speed on disk: $ dd if=/dev/zero ...


0

Each Processor has a run-queue, and might want to access other run-queues of other Processors. Locking is required to avoid corruption when a run-queue is manipulated by two or more Processors. Reference: Linux Kernel Development by Robert Love ( Partially available at http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=101760&seqNum=2 )


2

If all Ubuntu 12.04 x86 have the same addresses, it is most probably because they all ship the same Linux build. If you use a modern version of GCC with optimizations enabled to compile your own kernel, it will randomize your addresses for each build. And in fact, this is not even necessary for recent kernels. Since this commit (January 2014), the address ...


3

Many answers found on the Internet (including those in TNW's comment) rely on /sys/bus/usb/devices/2-2/power/level or /sys/bus/usb/devices/2-2/power/control which are both deprecated since 2.6.something kernel. For newer kernels, the suggested procedure is to unbind and rebind its driver, which usually results in a power cycle: # Find out which driver to ...


0

Linux way to check for lock: sudo hdparm -I /dev/sdX (with X = a..z ; you must know what device your drive is, of course). At the end of the (big) output, you MUST be able to read at in the last 10 lines: *not* locked.


0

I think your hunch at the very end of your question is on the right track. I'd suspect either A, NUMA-aware memory allocation migrating pages between CPUs, or B, more likely, the defrag code of transparent hugepages trying to find contiguous, aligned regions. Hugepages and transparent hugepages has been identified for both marked performance improvements on ...


2

In the good old times of ISA sound cards, it was not possible to create device nodes in /dev/ dynamically, so all devices had to be preallocated. This resulted in a limit of 8 sound cards, and the drivers were written with this limit in mind. Later, when devfs and USB were introduced, this limit was removed. However, the easiest way to do this was to make ...


0

I don't have a precise answer, but some of this is familiar. I don't know what a Probe Filter directory is, but CptSupermrkt explained that above. In PCI, a Northbridge connects to memory and the processor. ECC errors are associated with DRAM. There are Error Correcting Code bits stored along with each word. On reads they're checked on writes they're ...


3

If you do not want an absolute limit but just pressure the kernel to flush out the buffers faster, you should look at vm.vfs_cache_pressure This variable controls the tendency of the kernel to reclaim the memory which is used for caching of VFS caches, versus pagecache and swap. Increasing this value increases the rate at which VFS caches are ...


1

I don't know about A % but, You can set a time limit so it drops it after x amount of minutes. First in a terminal sync && echo 3 | sudo tee /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches To clear current caches. Make it a cron-job Press Alt-F2, type gksudo gedit /etc/crontab, Then Add this line near the bottom. */15 * * * * root sync && echo 3 ...


0

If your Linux distribution successfully EFI STUB boots, there is no need to use add_efi_memmap. This kernel command line option is rarely needed nowadays - UEFI firmware and Linux kernel support for same has significantly improved since 2009 era.


2

The actual question consists of these two items: Can I use 256 colors in the console without fbterm/framebuffer ? Where does the 8 color limit in the console come from ? To the first: apparently not. All of the suggested approaches use fbterm. To the second: it comes from the terminal description (aka "terminfo entry"). For Linux console, with TERM set ...


0

You probably have a real time application that is consuming all cpu (some bad implementation) and because of its realtime scheduling priority the system doesn't have enough resources available for other tasks. I suggests that you remove realtime priority from your applications and check which one is consuming a lot of CPU and, after correcting the problem, ...


0

My best guess is that you are lacking (non-free) firmware for the module. Try to determine what package you need (depends on distro). On debian stretch it would be firmware-iwlwifi. On debian jessie it might be firmware-linux-nonfree. If installing the respective firmware package does not solve the problem, what is the output of lspci? Can you also post the ...


1

tuned is a dynamic adaptive system tuning daemon that tunes system settings dynamically depending on usage. $ man tuned See the related documentation , and configuration files. /etc/tuned /etc/tuned/*.conf /usr/share/doc/tuned-2.4.1 /usr/share/doc/tuned-2.4.1/TIPS.txt This parameter may be useful for you. ** Set flushing to once per 5 minutes ** ...



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