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4

In the linux kernel source code in sysrq.c at line 415, there is a struct defined, what should happen when a certain key is pressed. So you see, no command in a terminal is excuted, instead of this, hard coded functions in the kernel are called. So, as long as the kernel is not crashed, you can press those keys, doesn't matter which application is running in ...


2

as linked in the wikipedia article in external links ... you can see that documentation here: Linux Magic System Request Key Hacks edit: this is also found in Linux kernel source under the Documentation subdirectory


0

I found the following in the commit message that introduced the tagging. To control what sockets of what UIDs are tagged by what, one uses: echo t $sock_fd $accounting_tag $the_billed_uid > /proc/net/xt_qtaguid/ctrl So whenever an skb (socket buffer) belongs to a sock_fd, it will be accounted against $the_billed_uid and matching stats will show up under ...


0

A fairly old (2006) paper discusses some of the kernel overhead that scales with memory size: http://halobates.de/memorywaste.pdf From it: page struct (keeps track of page allocation): 1.37% page tables: 0.5% Meanwhile, my 16GB test machine shows a total overhead of 4.3% so around 2% is still unaccounted for. Thus, the question is still not completely ...


3

You must distribute the source code you have used to compile the [GPL V2 licensed] binary that you distribute, So anyone that fetch the binary can modify and recompile the source code. The source code and binary don't have to be exactly side-by side. The source code should be easy to fetch, uncompress..., otherwise you should document how to get it, where ...


0

I've had the exact same issues and setting /sys/module/i915/parameters/semaphores to 1 solved it for me. Have you tried this?


2

The route or the ip utility get their information from a pseudo filesystem called procfs. It is normally mounted under /proc. There is a file called /proc/net/route, where you can see the kernel's IP routing table. You can print the routing table with cat instead, but the route utility formats the output human readable, because the IP adresses are stored in ...


0

check new kernel location in /boot/grub/grub.conf file. upgraded kernel params will show upper side of old kernel. Another thing is check default value. It should be 0 for new kernel.


1

First install XZ yum -y install xz then tar -xvf yourfile.tar.xz


1

Should work with the following command: tar -xvfz linux-2.6.32.65.tar.xz


-1

You should try: sudo apt-get install linux-headers-$(uname -r) if you haven't


1

It is not just embedded and desktops where you will find the Linux Kernel. 490 of the top 500 super computers are running, the full, Gnu/Linux. Around 80% of web servers are running Gnu/Linux. Most of the internet infrastructure is running Gnu/Linux or are embedded devices. Of these embedded devices, a large proportion will have the kernel named Linux.


1

I will not add anything about importance or not of knowing that kernel version since the comments and the answer above is fully explained. But as an answer for your comment in the answer above What about graphics drivers (kernel build vs run environment) ? What you must care is the gcc version that the kernel was compiled with so that you have to use ...


2

It's almost never important. If you're truly worried about the build system, you should consider the compiler, library and header versions before considering the kernel. It is up to the code itself as to whether it 'remembers' the kernel version. Some packages store a string representing the compiler version, as this is far more important. In fact the ...


0

The HID system checks for a specialized driver matching the vendor and product ids, and if there is none it is treated as a generic HID device : the descriptors sent by the device are used to determine what it is. In your case there is a specialized hid driver, but it looks like it wasn't loaded. You can try modprobe hid-dr, but you probably don't have it ...


0

The only SAS controllers I've ever used were LSI ones. I like them for their quality and performance and also for their copious diagnostic information. I have reviewed all the other SAS drivers in the Linux kernel and none of them provide anything that is even close to what LSI has. Not all of that diagnostic info is documented and some of that is downright ...


1

It is possible to install a Linux kernel without the usual user-space tools. This is commonly done in embedded systems such as routers. Typically, the kernel is loaded from ROM or Flash memory, and has been customised for the device in question (usually with required drivers compiled into the kernel rather than being loaded as modules). At least one ...


0

Minimal Linux Live is a small script that: downloads the source for the kernel and busybox compiles them generates a bootable 8Mb ISO with them The ISO then leaves you in a minimal shell with busybox. With QEMU you can easily boot into the system. Usage: git clone https://github.com/ivandavidov/minimal cd minimal/src ./build_minimal_linux_live.sh # ...


0

The kernel update tutorial posted on the Linux Mint Community is like a spam/fake. One can remove the version 3.18.2-031802-generic by running: sudo apt-get remove 'linux-headers-3.18.2*' 'linux-image-3.18.2*' In my particular case, everything works well now.


3

You are correct in that it is referring to syncing the disks. If the kernel panics, there could be a multitude of reasons - including a software bug in file system code. Syncing the disks could write corrupt data to the disks, such as if the panic was due to a bug in Ext4, for example - so the kernel plays it safe and doesn't flush anything to disk ...


0

I would say the most generally true answer is "no, you cant". There are various methods which may help in certain cases and these have been suggested already but these all seem to miss how this situation actually came to be. In truth, if you are using a custom kernel, that kernel can do anything, including hiding its presence or appearing to be a different ...


10

Sure, just check whether dpkg knows about it. First check the kernel version you are running. uname -a Linux orwell 3.2.0-4-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 3.2.65-1+deb7u2 x86_64 GNU/Linux Then tell dpkg to search for the kernel image file in the dpkg database. dpkg -S /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-4-amd64 linux-image-3.2.0-4-amd64: /boot/vmlinuz-3.2.0-4-amd64 Or, better, ...


5

Minimally, uname -r will give the kernal version, such as 3.18.6. However, when the kernel is compiled, an additional string can be configured in and attached to that and the distros usually do this to indicate their own patch level (after a dash) and flavour, such as 3.18.6-32-generic. That's one clue; obviously using your own string when you create a ...


2

Same as any other sudo apt-cache policy linux-generic is the version installed though the package manager and uname -r compare the versions for me its linux-generic: Installed: 3.19.0.15.14 Candidate: 3.19.0.15.14 and 3.19.0-15-generic which indicate the same version


1

The short answer to your question is as much as it possibly can, once it gives processes what they can use. The alternative is to leave the memory free which is wasteful. A machine with 16GB can't use 12GB today so it can use 20GB tomorrow. Any memory not used right this second is potential to save I/O and other effort that's forever lost -- you can't save ...


3

Use this: $ dpkg --get-selections | grep -o "^linux-image-$(uname -r)" linux-image-3.13.0-32-generic or $ dpkg -l | grep -o "linux-image-$(uname -r)" linux-image-3.13.0-32-generic EDIT: If you have multiple versions of the same kernel release, run the following bash script: #!/bin/bash rel="$(uname -r)" ver="$(uname -v)" current="${rel%-*}.${ver:1:2}" ...


2

CC means that the file listed is being compiled from C by the C compiler. LD means that the file listed is being linked from a number of object files by the linker (ld); in this case, aacraid is built from a number of files including src.o. SHIPPED means that the file listed was shipped in the kernel source and is being copied as-is rather than rebuilt; it ...


0

As I know this is an experimental feature. CONFIG_XFRM_SUB_POLICY: Support sub policy for developers. By using sub policy with main one, two policies can be applied to the same packet at once. Policy which lives shorter time in kernel should be a sub. This is excerpt from the book Linux Kernel Networking: type: Usually the type is ...


4

In general linux has very good support for network devices. If the device will work with your version of linux it will allow setup of nfs root with the appropriate initrd. so the problem with root over nfs is that you have to make an initrd that will accommodate it. NFS root without initrd may still work, but will not work with usb ethernet adapters as they ...



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