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5

While you won't notice any performance improvement (assuming you build your kernel with the modules you actaully require), there is some benefit in removing unneeded modules: first, it can significantly reduce the compile time and secondly, it will reduce the size of the final kernel. Creating a .config with make localmodconfig is a good way to get your ...


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According to kernel.org, the sytax is kworker/%u:%d%s (cpu, id, priority). The u designates a special CPU, the unbound cpu, meaning that the kthread is currently unbound. The workqueue workers which have negative nice value have 'H' postfixed to their names. (source)


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The modules are loaded as needed: don't worry, as there's no slowdown.


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The boot fails for the same reason as in the mentioned question - just booting a kernel without anything else doesn't do much good. You must provide a disk. Or an initrd image. But just enabling initrd doesn't give you an initrd image magically. You need to prepare one and provide it to qemu like so: qemu-system-i386 -kernel <your kernel> -initrd ...


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Please keep in mind that not using the kernel distributed with Slackware may break your system. Apart of that, compiling the official kernel is a difficult task and takes its time. You can learn about how to compile your own or the official linux kernel on Kernelnewbies.org. Related: http://kernelnewbies.org/KernelBuild https://www.kernel.org


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If you have space, please back up the disk as a whole (e.g. dd if=/dev/sdb of=disk.img bs=1M), before running random programs like fsck on things that you don't think are valid partitions :p. I'm not saying you've damaged it, but there's a very good chance of doing so while experimenting. The partition table shown by parted & the kernel looks ...


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It's done! I forgot to replace old ipv6.ko module with the new one.


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You can't. There used to be a bdi_add_flusher_task() that got dropped around 2009 iirc. Also it was originally intended for filesystems but I don't think you're writing a filesystem :-) But.. I can't see why you would have 100% cpu, that doesn't make sense - unless you're doing 10+ GB/s writes to some fantastic $100,000 array. RAM is so much faster than ...


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I know it's a bit late but this may be the source of your problem. : [Mon May 12 18:33:00.589 2014] spl: error reading image system.dtb, err - -1 A wrong device tree can lead to this kind of errors.


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There is a system.conf configuration option, DefaultControllers, that controls which cgroup hierarchies are attached to. By default it's cpu. I set it to null and /proc/$$$/cgroup no longer lists the getty process under cpuacct,cpu, and the test program works. Why the same configuration file -- I was using the default which is in use on both systems -- ...



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