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9

LVM is not overkill if you have 17 partitions. (IMHO) As for the partition limit, it just happens to be the default. Probably no one expected that many partitions on a device that used to have only a few megs. /usr/src/linux/Documentation/devices.txt: 179 block MMC block devices 0 = /dev/mmcblk0 First SD/MMC card ...


6

Because of how waitpid works. On a POSIX system, a signal (SIGCHLD) is delivered to a parent process when one of its child processes dies. At a high level, all waitpid is doing is blocking until a SIGCHLD signal is delivered for the process (or one of the processes) specified. You can't wait on arbitrary processes, because the SIGCHLD signal would never ...


5

It may be a huge doc to start, but I think it's worth the time you'll need to read it : Have look on the "Linux-Insides" doc, more precisely the Memory Management part. You can also read it through Gitbooks Have fun.


4

That's what make localmodconfig is for. Excerpt from /usr/src/linux/README: "make localmodconfig" Create a config based on current config and loaded modules (lsmod). Disables any module option that is not needed for the loaded modules.


3

It's because you are too early, if you wait until the UIDs are changed then your process runs as basic4_pwned. This worked for me: ./shellcode4js "test" & PID=$! sleep 0.0005 kill -SIGSTOP $PID grep ^Uid /proc/$PID/status Another try is to add a delay with usleep() and send the SIGSTOP later during that sleep. Then the programm runs with basic4_pwned ...


2

Depending on your distribution and kernel version the configuration of the currently running kernel can be in one of the following locations: /proc/config.gz /boot/config /boot/config-$(uname -r) The first one provides the proc filesystem and must be configured in the kernel config: General Setup ---> <*> Kernel .config support [*] ...


2

Source packages are not added to the rpm database, so they will not show on query. Probable location is ~/rpmbuild/{SOURCES,SPECS} with SOURCES containing the package sources and distribution patches while the SPECS subdirectory containing the .spec file being used to build the package (see rpmbuild (8) man page for details). If you can't find the sources ...


2

That's a kernel bug, Debian bug #789037 aka upstream bug #99161. It was introduced in a recent kernel update, and you probably saw it after the reboot (to install RAM) because you're now running that kernel. The fix is already available; you need to install it (and reboot). (BTW: I saw this on some of our servers after an unplanned reboot due to a circuit ...


2

If you've over-committed memory, a lot of tmpfs may be on disk. You may need to page stuff in to process the shutdown. mlock() is likely to force a lot of the other memory to disk. As you indicate you are diskless, you are likely reading over the network. Run sar gathering all stats while the server is shutting down. (sar may not be installed by ...


2

Disabled compile time option means the code isn't compiled. Unloading a module means, that the code has been compiled into a module, but is not loaded in memory and thus is not run. Be aware, that sometimes the modules may be loaded automatically, so if you need to disable certain functionality, the safe option is to disable it at compile time or ...


2

Defconfig generates a new kernel configuration with the default answer being used for all options. The default values are taken from a file located in the arch/$ARCH/configs/armada_370_v7up_defconfig file. These default configurations are not designed to exactly fit your target but are rather meant to be a superset so you only have to modify them a bit. ...


2

You should define what exactly booting means to you. If you want to delay the moment the kernel is starting to run, you'll need to configure the boot loader. I guess (but I am not sure) that GRUB is flexible enough to be configurable for that purpose. If you want to delay the moment the Linux system is starting to initialize some server (including a login ...


1

There are two ways to pass arguments to kernel: 1. Compile them inside. 2. Use bootloader So first check if your arguments are not compiled into kernel. Second setenv command you've found in not a bash command but boot loader command. It depends on how particular device made, but usually there is a partition in some internal storage (flash memory of your ...


1

You can use a uEnv.txt file in your boot partition to specify arguments for the boot. This is an example for Xilinx zynq-7000 devices from the yocto meta-zybo layer: kernel_image=uImage devicetree_image=zybo-zynq7.dtb bootargs=console=ttyPS0,115200 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rw rootwait earlyprintk uenvcmd=echo Copying Linux from SD to RAM... && fatload ...


1

Is the program running on a filesystem that honors the setuid bit on files (mount -o nosuid)? If I were debugging this, I would print the output of getuid() and geteuid() on program startup, to see whether the setuid bit is being honored.


1

Well, relatively both yes and No. Linus Torvalds did write most of the kernel code in d beginning i.e he wrote device drivers , HD access and released a version, he called, 0.01. This kernel ,which is called Linux, was afterwards combined with GNU to produce a complete free OS, and then gradually volunteers increased to thousands to write kernel. He ...


1

First, no, I don't think that Linus Torvalds himself does still write much code that goes into the kernel. But what he did some years ago was writing a source control management tool as he wasn't quite happy about the existing SCM Tools at that time. If you want to hear his own words, you can for example watch one of his great talks: ...


1

I believe Linux kernel mailing list is where kernel changes and other discussions take place. There are literally thousands of developers around the world that work together on this (since its open source). The mailing list does more than just discuss code changes though. Pretty much anything to do with the kernel. Linus Torvalds supervises code changes to ...


1

This is a None Maskable Interupt (NMI) and is usually triggered by a hardware event on your system. In this case it looks like the specific NMI is not configured and although it has received the NMI it doe snot know what to do with it so it s just ignores it. What should you do further? If you just want get rid of the message then you could try hiding it ...


1

Hi please follow following steps to compile driver as module for arm architecture. Cross-compiling the rt kernel on Linux Export the following variables to specify cross-compilation options: export ARCH=arm export CROSS_COMPILE=~/tools/arm-bcm2708/gcc-linaro-arm-linux-gnueabihf- raspbian/bin/arm-linux-gnueabihf- make bcmrpi_rt_defconfig Compile the ...


1

There's an excellent chance that the "graphical parts" you're after aren't in the kernel at all. Most of a regular Linux box's graphics stack is in user space, so I don't see why Android would be any different. The only large piece of graphics code in the stock Linux kernel is the Direct Rendering Manager, which is little more than an interface that lets ...


1

http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/drivers/ata/libata-core.c?v=3.5#L1987 The code makes a call to ata_dev_set_feature(dev, SETFEATURES_SPINUP, 0);


1

When the CPU bandwidth consumption of a group exceeds this limit [quota] (for that period), the tasks belonging to its hierarchy will be throttled and are not allowed to run again until the next period. I'd say that they are trying to point out, that if you provision 10 seconds of CPU time in a minute, then the app can be stopped for 50 seconds as ...


1

The /dev/kmsg represeted by the kmsg_fops structure which has file_operations type that represents standard operations with a file: const struct file_operations kmsg_fops = { .open = devkmsg_open, .read = devkmsg_read, .write_iter = devkmsg_write, .llseek = devkmsg_llseek, .poll = devkmsg_poll, .release = devkmsg_release, }; You ...



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