Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Normally modprobe loads modules from sub folders located in /lib/modules/$(uname -r). However all modules should be also listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep. If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list then run command depmod which will include your module to modules.dep.


3

You need CONFIG_USB_USBNET together with whatever CONFIG_USB_NET_* module you need for your USB device. The only thing I can find in my config that could match your EEM is CONFIG_USB_NET_CDC_EEM but I don't have that enabled, that is another USB device that I don't own.


2

When patching Linux kernel to the next minor version, you should use incremental patch. For your case, you should patch with patch-3.13.7-8.xz. This will patch your kernel source 3.13.7 to 3.13.8.


2

Ok, to fully answer your question, you need to read a book on introductory programing in C and Tanenbaum and the dragon book. Start with learning C. Some of the basic pieces to get you started: when compiling a C program there are traditionally several distinct phases. (modern compilers may do cross phase optimization) These phases are: prepossessor. This ...


2

There is an answer in Kernel documentation: 3.1.2 usbmouse ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ For embedded systems, for mice with broken HID descriptors and just any other use when the big usbhid wouldn't be a good choice, there is the usbmouse driver. It handles USB mice only. It uses a simpler HIDBP protocol. This also means the mice must support this simpler protocol. Not ...


1

From Kernel configuration and building in Linux 2.5 (the section I'm quoting deals with changes brought in 2.5/2.6 kernels) : Compiling built-in objects and modules in a single pass, recognizing changed command line arguments [...] The major performance issue for the kernel build are the invocations of make (most of the time is of course normally ...


1

Since you have already cron'ed the ntp time updates via ntpupdate why not also just add the hardware sync to that cron (or make a second one)? I have used this same method on some of my company's really really old RHEL 3 & 4 boxes to keep their clocks in sync. 0 */4 * * * ntpdate mytimeserver.com && ( hwclock --adjust; hwclock -w ) This cron ...


1

With regard to kernel modules/device drivers, "Linux Device Drivers, 3rd Edition" is available free online. There are more recent and more in depth books on the topic but that is a good start. One of the authors is Greg Kroah-Hartman, a lead kernel developer, who has another free online book, "Linux Kernel in a Nutshell". With regard to the design and ...


1

Official kernel.org site. Lots of links for further reading. The HOWTO may be a good starting point.


1

You should be fine with: cat /proc/version


1

As suggested by Mali, we need to enable the kernel support for SPI and I2C transmission protocol. I did it compiling the kernel separately but we can do it from the Buildroot folder runnning make linux-menuconfig During the kernel 3.8.13 configuration, add: linux-3.8.13$ make menuconfig Go to Device Drivers menu and check the I2C support pressing ...


1

From what I understand, Target Package -> Hardware handling -> i2c-tools refers to user space i2c utilities. What you miss is kernel space i2c modules, you need to add them in make linux-menuconfig.


1

It doesn't look like there's a way to search/check manually, but the call to nf_register_sockopt will fail if the range you're registering overlaps with the existing range. Here's a link to the source, which could use some comments, but you can see the overlap check at the beginning of the function. If you hop to netfilter.h, you'll see the lack of a ...


1

To ensure that the system will reboot no matter what, I always do this sequence: # echo s > /proc/sysrq-trigger # echo u > /proc/sysrq-trigger # echo s > /proc/sysrq-trigger # echo b > /proc/sysrq-trigger This requests the kernel to do: emergency sync of the block devices mount readonly of all filesystems again a sync force an immediate ...


1

You have to bypass the normal shutdown process that unmounts filesystems, stops daemons and so on. This is where it stops - it cannot safely stop the processes. What you need is reboot -f or poweroff -f whatever you want to achieve (some init systems may bring their own commands -- systemd for instance). The "force" feature skips the regular shutdown ...


1

Try the following command in your terminal sudo apt-get install linux-generic



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible