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8

It's considered unsafe to edit .config because there are CONFIG-options which have dependencies on other options (needing some to be set, requiring others to be turned off, etc.). Other options aren't meant to be set by the user at all, but are set automatically by make config (resp. Kconfig to be correct) depending on architecture details, e.g. ...


4

It's pretty straight forward, although we should distinguish between "driver" and "module". A driver may or may not be a module. If it is not, then it is built into the kernel loaded by the bootloader. If it is a module, then it is in a filesystem hierarchy rooted at /lib/modules/[kernel-release].1 Note that it is possible to boot a kernel together with ...


4

ENOANO appeared in Linux 0.97, which was released on 1992-08-01. For a very long time, it wasn't used anywhere; it's since then been used now and then in some drivers as “I didn't know what error code to use”. It's now only in uapi/asm-generic/errno.h (i.e. in the header files for userland programs), but it was moved there automatically, so that's no ...


3

In your output, the point where the kernel is actually loaded is this one: Init version 2.86 booting Which is after 23 seconds. After that, init, a userspace process, takes over and begins configuration of the userspace, although this inevitably provokes activation of various kernel drivers, possibly including loading appropriate modules. You haven't ...


3

If you want to keep pacman from up/down grading some package(s), you put a line in /etc/pacman.conf: # Pacman won't upgrade packages listed in IgnorePkg and members of IgnoreGroup #IgnorePkg = #IgnoreGroup = I think you want to have a line like this in pacman.conf: IgnorePkg = linux linux-headers linux-api-headers As you point out, that just keeps ...


3

First, /sys/class is a convenient way to find things in /sys. You'll find everything inside is actually a symlink; I'm pretty sure your first stanza is symlink'd to your third stanza. The 2nd stanza is the kernel reading the temperature directly from the CPU/chipset. The 3rd stanza is the kernel getting the value from the BIOS via ACPI. While on your system ...


3

In Linux, most drivers can be either built statically into the kernel, or built as modules. This is a choice you can make when the kernel is being configured for compilation. They will only appear in /lib/modules/$(uname -r) if they are built as loadable modules. Typically, for general purpose systems, especially for pre-compiled kernels made available as ...


3

The file /proc/kallsyms lists all the symbols of the running kernel. By convention, system calls have a name that begin with sys_. On a 64-bit system, system calls for 32-bit programs have a name that begin with sys32_. Strictly speaking, this lists internal kernel functions, not system call, but I think that the correspondence does work (every system call ...


2

TL;DR I kept finding new alternatives when writing this answer, so I just wrote a bit of details about each of them, and made some stats. Basically, you can either: Read Gilles' answer, which provides a clean and fast way to do it (relies on /proc). Use the documentation resources. Use your system's C header files. Use the kernel source code itself. Use ...


2

I was using a driver for <3.4 kernel and I have the 3.13. I had downloaded a new driver. I saw "3.1.3"...


2

The command that you're using to display the CPU load is running in a tight loop, so it's competing with CPUburn. If you want to observe the CPU load that CPUburn would have with no competition, add something like sleep 1 in the loop. In your test, initially the observer loop gets pretty much all the CPU, then progressively the burnP6 gain more and more CPU ...


1

I'll give you my take on the article. kdbus is supposed to replace D-Bus. Can this be confirmed somehow? That is explicitly the intent, but WRT "confirming" it, there's no central authority that can say, "Yes, here is our timeline for the future of GNU/Linux" -- beyond the kernel, that's a heterogeneous and de-centralized realm. Of course, seeing as ...


1

I did all of these solutions but problem was about my kernel! linux-headers-uname -r wanted to install 3.16.0-3 headers due to my kernel version but there is no such linux kernel header in Debian repos: There is 3.16.0-4 Solution: upgrade my kernel via apt-get then everything works fine.


1

Run: $ sudo apt-get update $ sudo apt-get install linux-headers-`uname -r` If that second command still fails to find anything, then: $ apt-cache search linux-headers- to list all the linux-headers packages available. At least one should match the kernel you are running (as displayed by uname -r). Then: sudo apt-get install linux-headers-<version ...


1

There is not much risk to this as long as you don't vastly exceed the latest version used on the distro, although even then there's no definite problem that will occur. The primary issue is that although the kernel -> userspace ABI is supposed to be stable, there could, in theory, be a point at which it breaks. Find a copy of Debian 2.0 and build a 3.17 ...


1

The symptoms are very consistent with a mostly saturated IO system, however having for the most part ruled out IO load from the OS/userspace side, another possibility is the drive running self-tests on itself, which may include reading from all the sectors. This should be queryable/tunable from smartctl (At least one place being smartctl -c for querying). ...


1

I guess I could say that I solved this problem. I downloaded Mfgtools-Rel-1.6.2.042-Linux-Android-V11.zip from aValue's homepage and used the pre-compiled kernel in that archive instead of the one from the supplied CD and the problem went away. The creation date of the new kernel was a few months later than the rebooting kernel so I guess aValue solved this ...



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