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scp itself has no such feature. With GNU parallel you can use the sem command (from semaphore) to arbitrarily limit concurrent processes: sem --id scp -j 50 scp ... For all processes started with the same --id, this applies a limit of 50 concurrent instances. An attempt to start a 51st process will wait (indefinitely) until one of the other processes ...


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sudo ulimit fails because ulimit is a built-in and sudo takes an executable as the first argument which it will search in PATH. sudo cd / fails for the same reason. A workaround is to do: sudo sh -c "ulimit -n 65535 && exec su $LOGNAME" which sets the ulimit, and restore the original user removing the sudo privileges as desired. Taken from this ...


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You need to complete some more steps to increase max open files in ubuntu. Edit /etc/pam.d/common-session and append below line session required pam_limits.so Restart your system to apply the changes. You can set limits to all users on system by adding below lines. * soft nofile 10000 * hard nofile 30000 And reboot the ...


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stat or /proc/[PID]/mountinfo should still tell you what the device numbers are: [root@XXXlin01 block]# stat --printf="%d" /tmp/mnt; echo 24 [root@XXXlin01 block]# stat --printf="%d" /tmp/mnt2; echo 25 [root@XXXlin01 block]# grep "/tmp/mnt" /proc/22195/mountinfo 40 20 0:24 / /tmp/mnt rw,relatime - tmpfs none rw 41 20 0:25 / /tmp/mnt2 rw,relatime - tmpfs ...


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Thanks to @hrv for the insight. I've confirmed after a quick experiment: when the /etc/pam.d/sudo included pam_limits.so, then running sudo did set them, and when the /etc/pam.d/sudo did not include them, then running sudo didn't set them. I checked a couple of different machines and one of them did include pam_limits.so within /etc/pam.d/sudo while the ...



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