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5

There is big difference between them. ulimit -e only set the RLIMIT_NICE, which is a upper bound value to which the process's nice value can be set using setpriority or nice. renice alters the priority of running process. Doing strace: $ cat test.sh #!/bin/bash ulimit -e 19 Then: $ strace ./test.sh ................................................... ...


5

He's saying it's bound by a 64-bit type, which has a maximum value of (2 ^ 64) - 1 unsigned, or (2 ^ 63) - 1 signed (1 bit holds the sign, +/-). The type is not FILE; it's what the implementation uses to track the offset into the file, namely off_t, which is a typedef for a signed 64-bit type.1 (2 ^ 63) - 1 = 9223372036854775807. If a terabyte is 1000 ^ ...


1

You want the following rules in your iptables to answer both requirements in your question: iptables -t filter -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT iptables -t filter -I INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -m state \ --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT # Adjust "--connlimit-above NN" to limit the maximum connections per IP # that you need. iptables -t filter -I ...


0

I would actually use CloudLinux, as your exact issues are what it was designed to balance. Many shared hosting evironments add this kernel module to limit their own user resource usage as well.


0

/etc/security/limits.conf Is the place where you can set such ulimit related defauls or user specific limits. They will get active on new user sessions.


5

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --syn --dport 80 -m connlimit --connlimit-above 15 --connlimit-mask 32 -j REJECT --reject-with tcp-reset will reject connections above 15 from one source IP. sudo iptables -A INPUT -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -m limit --limit 150/second --limit-burst 160 -j ACCEPT In this 160 new connections (packets really) are ...



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