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4

KVM is a kernel API for virtualisation. It doesn't deal with serial ports. qemu is a machine (PC and other) emulator which can use kvm for improving virtualisation performance. It can emulate a standard 8250 UART serial port (isa-serial) or paravirtualised serial port (virtio-serial). In qemu, you define your machine with command-line arguments that specify ...


4

You can do that in the console with virsh domif-setlink domain interface-device state and check it with virsh domifstat domain interface-device Have a look at the man page for details.


3

Yes, add bind-interfaces except-interface=virbr0 to some file in /etc/dnsmasq.d. (that's what Ubuntu's libvirt-bin package (at least) does automatically now)


3

The hypervisor cannot influence the device naming of the guest. Modern Linux distros call most disk types sda. If a disk appears to the guest as such type then it is called sdx. The hda refers towards the hypervisor to the first disk.


2

You need DNAT in PREROUTING and maybe also a rule in INPUT but I am not sure whether this can explain the error message. Do you have a route to this network on the host? Any fancy ip rule stuff? Please provide the output of ip addr, ip route, and ip rule. iptables -t nat -I PREROUTING -p tcp -d 169.254.169.254 --dport 80 -j DNAT --to-destination $local_ip ...


2

If you look inside the file /etc/libvirt/qemu.conf you'll notice this section: # The user for QEMU processes run by the system instance. It can be # specified as a user name or as a user id. The qemu driver will try to # parse this value first as a name and then, if the name doesn't exist, # as a user id. # # Since a sequence of digits is a valid user name, ...


2

You can't use a bridge interface to forward traffic between subnets. Bridges are meant for joining two layer 2 networks, not 2 subnets (which are layer 3). You have to route traffic between the networks instead. Well, technically you could bridge them, but it requires you to add a routing rule to every single host on both subnets letting them know that they ...


1

You need to define and start the networks in libvirt before. Start by creating a XML file describing your network. Enter in libvirt console, define the network using the XML file and then activate it. You also might mark as autostart. net-define example.xml net-autostart vbr0 net-start vbr0 The last step is create your VM adding the network previously ...


1

From the man page:- virsh list --autostart should do it.


1

Take a look at the reference documentation for the libvirt domain XML files, specifically this section: Hard drives, floppy disks, CDROMs. target The target element controls the bus / device under which the disk is exposed to the guest OS. The dev attribute indicates the "logical" device name. The actual device name specified is not guaranteed ...


1

I think this is just how it works. All my KVM instances I've created all contain this: <target dev='hda' bus='ide'/> And yet every single one of them has their HDD as not /dev/sda but /dev/vda, for example: $ sudo fdisk -l Disk /dev/vda: 10.7 GB, 10737418240 bytes 16 heads, 63 sectors/track, 20805 cylinders Units = cylinders of 1008 * 512 = 516096 ...



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