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27

Edit /etc/systemd/logind.conf and make sure you have, HandleLidSwitch=ignore which will make it ignore the lid being closed. (You may need to also undo the other changes you've made). Full details over at the archlinux Wiki. The man page for logind.conf also has the relevant information, HandlePowerKey=, HandleSuspendKey=, HandleHibernateKey=, ...


25

Thankfully, there is no Linux equivalent of the Windows registry. Configuration is kept in (mostly) text files: The system configuration is in text files under /etc. The system state, which in Windows ends up mixed with configuration data, lives under /var. User configuration and state lives in “dot files”, i.e., files and directories whose name begins ...


17

I'm not sure what issues you're constantly experiencing but I run Gentoo on Lenovo Thinkpad without problems (fingerprint reader does not work) - with possible problems with removal of BKL in recent kernels (however 2.6.33 worked ok). Previously I used IBM Thinkpad. From my small experience with them: Thinkpads seems to have a community which helps ...


12

No, it doesn't. The issue isn't with the type of disk (spinning/non-spinning), it's with committing disk buffers from RAM to disk. If the power goes out suddenly, some of these buffers may never get committed to disk, and having barriers enabled improves your chances of recovering the filesystem. There's also an additional issue with the disk's on-board ...


8

There is no point in disabling logging because of SSD characteristics. SSD firmwares are even able to distribute repeated writes to the same sector 'wear leveling' - and the specified maximal write cycle count (for each sector) is quite high. For example Hitachi specifies its SSD drives for '10 full drive writes per day for five years'. As a vendor, you ...


8

There seems to be no way to log this data to a file. For the boot process, there is the bootlogd package which creates the file /var/log/boot, but nothing for the shutdown/reboot process. As far as I can see there is no way to log with rsyslog either, and even if there was, there are messages printed after rsyslog is stopped. Part of my shutdown/reboot ...


7

So, it sounds like you have not installed a boot loader (e.g. grub) on the disk. This means that although you have a valid OS on it, there is no way to boot it and so you can't use it. You need to attach the HDD to a working computer (you can use a live CD), set up a chroot environment and install grub on it. Mount the partition you will be using as / (I ...


6

This will vary from user to user and is subjective, but I think Ubuntu is very easy to install and use (certainly a far cry from the good old days of 20 floppy disks and slackware :-) Specifically, Ubuntu has never let me down in detecting and configuring itself to the host hardware, so that's a definite plus. Also, it comes with a live CD, so you can try ...


6

4GB is tons of RAM. You do not have to be contemplating "lightweight" distros at all. A large project is a large project, but I am a little bit curious as to why you believe that working on one requires a correspondingly large amount of RAM, because generally it does not. I have done R on R stuff in the past and I know that is not resource light but it does ...


6

Powertop is not a permanent tool, as you know, so you will have to setup your system to run the commands through sysctl, udev, systemd units, scripts, whatever... In order to see what commands are used by powertop you will have to run powertop --html BEFORE MAKING ANY CHANGES, that is, BEFORE toggling the settings from Bad to Good. If you already tuned for ...


5

Matrox have little external boxes that will turn a single VGA into a double or triple VGA or DVI. I ran my laptop with my main laptop screen and 2 external screens using one. Not sure how well the linux drivers work though. I was using WinXP, the one after that, and OSX at the time on the Thinkpad T60. From a quick search: ...


5

My experience is mostly with Dell latitude series of laptops. Looking for Linux compatibility, their actual series is a go, and, on Fedora, they work with all the power saving features (suspend, resume, disk spinning...) I am not biased, but Intel hardware (Centrino brands, Core2 Duo, new Core i3, i5 and i7) are good to go, mostly because all of the ...


5

The problem with notebooks with Linux preinstalled is which distro comes with them. I've bought one which had an unknown distro (Satux) that was Debian-based, but included proprietary drivers and no access to the sources for the distro or drivers. When I finally decided to install Ubuntu over it, I started to have to chase drivers all around the internet, ...


5

If you want to push the freedom exigence as far as possible, you would also want a coreboot, U-Boot or PMON BIOS. The best (only?) option, in this case, is RMS's laptop: a Lemote YeeLoong, using PMON. It is however rather small (either 8.9'' or 10'') and underpowered, but very cheap. Check out "Lemote linux PC and Linux laptops" When it comes to choosing a ...


4

Xdmx is not that hard (though it will have issues here and there depending on hardware), and is a good, cheap way to add an extra monitor – you can use an iPad or any other device that supports running an X Server. IBM DeveloperWorks guide to Xdmx: Distributed multihead support with Linux and Xdmx EDIT: I've found it much more effective to run ...


4

Right now I am answering this with my notebook connected to a monitor. To have my desktop extended I use xrandr and its graphical interface ARandR, both of them working pretty well. Indeed I have a script, which I execute everytime I log to my notebook having the screen attached to it: #!/bin/sh xrandr --output LVDS1 --mode 1280x800 --pos 0x0 --rotate ...


4

As far as I know there is no special tablet pc linux distribution available. Ubuntu 10.10 is heading towards a better tablet/touch based input support: They are including their multi touch framework uTouch in the current release. See the blog post from Canonical from 16th August, 2010: "Multi-touch Support Lands in Maverick". "Unity" is the new light ...


4

On a typical laptop, you need to press the Fn key to press SysRq. If you also press the letter in the same movement, you end up pressing Fn+Alt+SysRq+letter. But several letters are mapped to numeric keypad keys when combined with Fn. For example, if you try to press Alt+SysRq+U, you end up pressing Alt+SysRq+Num4 instead. To avoid this pitfall, press and ...


4

If the question were asked 10 years ago, I would say the only way for this is to enter into play with disk partitioning and boot loaders. For that case, count how many distros would you install on the laptop, which size is needed for each of them, repartition the disk and install each of them into separate partition. Ask the first installed one to put its ...


4

Here are some tests done by the folks @ IBM: cpufreq tuning results They're not specifically testing battery life but should give you an idea about ondemand - versus - conservative power consumption.


4

Seeing the log in real time I've found that during shutdown there is usually an Ubuntu logo and flashing lights, which is shown instead of a log of the shutdown process. If there are errors, then they're kind of shown, but messily. However, whilst shutting down, if I press the Windows key and r (Metar), then I get to see the success and failure of the ...


4

I do not have this laptop but given the impeccable support of Linux under any of the Thinkpad models I've had from the T40's up to the T410 I'm currently using I would be utterly shocked if those buttons didn't just work as they should. From my 10+ years of using Thinkpads with various Linux distros everything has typically worked without issue, even down ...


3

Sony Vaio Laptops I have found an invaluable resource of information from this Google code page. ACPI I suggest you start there and work your way around the internet using keywords such as ACPI. ACPI is what allows your OS to control things such as fans, power-state (hibernation and resume), screen brightness among other things. lm-sensors Try ...


3

It is possible to have a filesystem directly on a block device with no partition table on it, and there's nothing intrinsically wrong with that. It just means you can have only one filesystem and nothing else on it (no swap partition, etc...). However, it is unlikely that such a block device is bootable. The bootloader (grub) usually sneaks itself into some ...


3

This is not really a good or bad thing. The error "doesn't contain a valid partition table" does not always actually mean that. You can have a valid partition table at an unrecognized offset and get the same error. For instance: if you create a LVM volume on a raw disk without first creating a partition and then lay down a file system on the volume you ...


3

There are some suggestions in this Redhat KB doc. https://access.redhat.com/knowledge/docs/en-US/Red_Hat_Enterprise_Linux/6/html-single/Power_Management_Guide/index.html#gnome-power-manager 1. Using GNOME Power Managment Applet Usually I open up the GNOME Power Management applet and disable any dimming etc. when on AC power. Have you done these things ...


3

For a minimal distro, I'd say DSL (Damn Small Linux, Debian based) - but it doesn't really matter as you can configure all but any distro to be lightweight by tweaking and removing features. If you want to focus on development, it is more important to find a mainstream, stable project (which has an active community, for support) - probably you want a distro ...


3

Use Arch Linux. You only install a base system at first, so no fat. Once you pick a repository, installing virtually any software is only a pacman -S away. After about a week, you will have reached steady state, and you'll only have installed what you need. I have an older laptop, a Compaq NC8000, with 2Gb. It runs Arch, and it never pages. I've got a ...


3

I just got my T440s, installed Arch Linux on it and can confirm that Fn+Esc locks the Fn keys to their "proper" function. No user-intervention needed to get it working, and Arch just installs the stock kernel so no magic pathes present. The thinkpad_acpi kernel module is loaded, tp_smapi not (and refuses to be), haven't tried without them. Side effect: a ...



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