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0

Did you try ctrl+Q? You could switch to an inactive virtual console with ctrl+alt+F11 for example.


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From tips on Booting Linux inside a MacBook using grub and EFI: In Debian/squeeze you may need to load some modules quite early (in particular if you have a crypted root partition: otherwise the keyboard will not work at the moment when the initrd will ask you the password). To this end, append to the file /etc/initramfs-tools/modules these lines: #as ...


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Note that, unless you tell it not to via "--no-convert", localectl will set the X settings to be equivalent to the console settings if you are setting console keymap via set-keymap and will set console equivalent to the X settings if you are setting the X keymap via set-x11-keymap. See man localectl.


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I can't comment so leaving this as an answer: What version of the Linux kernel are you using? Do the extra (F13-F24) keys work on Windows or OS X? Can you pastebin the HID descriptor?


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Aeyoun, http://www.xfree86.org/4.0/xmodmap.1.html Have you attempted to correct this by applying an xmodmap to your X11 session? This will intercept the keys affected, and apply the output you require. xmodmap -pke > crud will display your Key-Map to Key-Code bindings. Determine the Key-Map Identity which are producing incorrect Key-Code Identity ...


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I managed to get it working with bluetoothctl -a I guess the -a option is the replacement for bluez-simple-agent. From man bluetoothctl: -a, --agent=CAPABILITY Register agent handler


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Use showkey to know your key scancode: $ sudo showkey -s 0xe0 0xXX Kernel will add 8 to you code, use 112 instead 120: $ sudo setkeycodes e0XX 112 Use xmodmap to make your key report XF86AudioMute keysym: $ xmodmap -e "keycode 120 = XF86AudioMute" Optional. Press you key when creating shortcut to what you want in the settings of your DE.



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