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Solution for all Corsair mechanical keyboards with usbhid quirks. sudo nano /etc/default/grub or any other editor you like to use instead of nano. you will see this line GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="" make sure to put the usbhid.quircks between the quotes and save that. In my case I had to change it to this line ...


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I also have an N2600 with similar symptoms. But for my, anything after 3.16 would see this problem, but 3.16 and below was fine. I've found that acpi=off gets stuff working again. Clearly there is some kind of issues with timers or CPU sleep states that needs to be addressed.


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Check the kernel processes wouldn't be on loop check top command and also check your kern.log and log for issue. You can find them on : /var/log/kern.log I guess Kernel won't accept keyboard interrupts sometimes.


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I had a similar problem (with Xfce): I wanted mouse emulation not to expire. What worked: launch the script via autostart (like you do) put sleep 5s at the start of the script (increase "5s" if necessary) Rationale: if your script works when launched manually, it is not guilty. So the DE must be overriding your setting (typically it will apply its ...


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The behavior is unrelated to settings of the console/terminal. Rather, it is a feature of the terminal (or terminal emulator) itself. The terminfo database's predefined capabilities reflect existing practice across a few thousand terminal types. If you read through the list of predefined capabilities, you may notice that there are several definitions for ...


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Why not put it in your .xinitrc? As @cylgalad already said, xmodmap works on a specific instance of X. Crontab doesn't know which $DISPLAY to use, worst yet at boot time there is no X started. As a rule of thumb, if you want to start any X client from crontab (e.g.I use zenity to remind me to read my gas meter etc.) you have to specify the DISPLAY variable ...


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Solution: Install a program for this purpose sudo apt-get install numlockx Edit this file with your favourite text editor as root /etc/mdm/Init/Default Add these lines at the beginning of the file if [ -x /usr/bin/numlockx ]; then /usr/bin/numlockx on fi


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With udev on, get your keyboard layout with: xkbcomp $DISPLAY mylayout.xkb Then you should be able to load it (once udev is off) by: xkbcomp -i <XInput_id> mylayout.xkb $DISPLAY where <XInput_id> can be found by xinput list or grep XINPUT /var/log/Xorg.0.log. References that may be of interest: this and that (not an exact duplicate).


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Maybe I overlook something, but isn't this just a matter of adding the XF86MonBrightnessDown and XF86MonBrightnessUp to your xmodmap? xmodmap -e "keycode 101 = XF86MonBrightnessDown NoSymbol XF86MonBrightnessDown" for testing this temporarily. Similar for brightness up. If it works, you need to make this permanent depending on your display manager. LXDE ...


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iwlwifi is a non free firmware , according to NetbootFirmware you need to add the non-free firmware to Initramfs: Initramfs is essentially a concatenation of gzipped cpio archives which are extracted into a ramdisk and used as an early userspace by the Linux kernel. Debian Installer's initrd.gz is in fact a single gzipped cpio archive containing all the ...


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These keys have undefined behavior to Lunbuntu/Xorg/LXDE, they worked in windows because your drivers were machine specific, these keys/ key combinations may vary among thinkpads and therefore are not covered by thinkpad_acpi The keys are not identified because either: The keycodes are not mapped to any functionality The scancodes created by those ...


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Create a file called, e.g., usbhid.conf in /etc/modprobe.d/ and add the following line: blacklist usbhid Then re-generate your initramfs with: update-initramfs -u -k $(uname -r) or, if you want to rebuild the initramfs for all installed kernel versions: update-initramfs -u -k all After you reboot, usbhid.ko will be prevented from loading. This will ...


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You could simply remove the corresponding drivers: sudo rm /lib/modules/<your_kernel>/kernel/drivers/hid/usbhid/* (actually, you should rather move those drivers somewhere in case you'll want them back, but I hope you get the idea)


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Perhaps you were looking at this: KEYMAP (Português) The "tty" (Linux console) keymaps and fonts are separate from GNOME. For that (running in X), this page may help for a start: Can't configure correct keymap for my language However, the system settings in GNOME are the best place to look, e.g., as in How to change system language?



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