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7

To find out which app/program grabbed your key use the debug keysym XF86LogGrabInfo. Use xdotool to press keys + XF86LogGrabInfo at the same time e.g. in a terminal run KEY=XF86AudioPlay xdotool keydown ${KEY}; xdotool key XF86LogGrabInfo; xdotool keyup ${KEY} Then check for output with tail /var/log/Xorg.0.log Note that with gnome 3/gdm and systemd this ...


1

Put everything into a shell script and start the shell script with your shortcut.


1

I found a solution. Rather than delete the question, I thought I'd post what I have. I'm sure someone or other has the same question somewhere, and if not, I'm sure there's still a cleaner way of doing this. Here goes. (This, by the way, is to make a keyboard shortcut to move the active window to workspace 4.) First, I wrote a script (~/.move4.sh): ...


0

The keys usually used to control keyboard backlight are XF86KbdBrightnessUp and XF86KbdBrightnessDown. You just need to find a way to bind it to the following shell command lines (and set the sudoers as needed): # Light off the leds sudo echo 0 > /sys/class/leds/asus::kbd_backlight/brightness # Light on the leds (full power) sudo echo 100 > ...


2

It looks like tmux is doing the right thing for your example: For example, ctrl-shift-right passes as ^[[C (which is the same as the escape sequence of the right key), instead of ^[OC (outside tmux). because the usual connotation of that sequence is that it is the same as cursor-movement sent from the host. A zero parameter is the same as a missing ...


46

To find out about a key binding. In bash: $ bind -p | grep -a '{' "\e{": complete-into-braces "{": self-insert $ LESS='+/complete-into-braces' man bash complete-into-braces (M-{) Perform filename completion and insert the list of possible com‐ pletions enclosed within braces so the list is available to the shell (see ...


1

sysvinit is deprecated in favor of systemd in Debian jessie. So you cannot change the system's behavior by editing /etc/inittab or /etc/init/*.conf. When user presses Ctrl+Alt+DEL on the console, systemd invokes /lib/systemd/system/ctrl-alt-del.target which is by default a symlink to reboot.target in the same directory, that results in a simple reboot. ...


0

I also tried to modify the file /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/pc by: "Key <CAPS> {[Enter]};" But nothing worked. Almost there... There is no such thing as Enter. The keyword here is Return so edit your /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/pc like this (original line commented out with //): // key <CAPS> { [ Caps_Lock ] }; ...


0

I ended up fixing this just now. I tried temporarily renaming my ~/.config directory so that it wasn't found. And that seemed to fix it. I then handpicked some of the config subdirectories I wanted to keep, copied those over to the newly created .config directory, and made sure everything was still working properly I lost some useful configs, but at least ...


1

You have probably figured out the answer for yourself by now. However, if anyone happens to google your question and end up here, the following steps fixed it for me: Navigate into your System Settings → Languages → Input Methods. If "IBus" is not available in the "Input Method" drop-down menu, click the "Add Support for IBus" button. Else, continue to ...


1

Hello Googler from the future! I have found a fix with the help of this post , hopefully it will work for you: Open up your System Settings then go to Languages → Input Methods. On the dropdown menu in the "Input Method" section select "IBus". If the option is not avaible, click the "Add support for IBus" button, then do step 2. Restart your machine.


0

Yes, it's possible to perform this. You should open menu, choose "Build -> Set Build Commands" and change the contents of "Execute" field to command "%f" if you want to execute it in Geany terminal. Or if you'll be satisfied with executing the command in "Compiler" tab (it lacks interactivity, coloring support and so on), change the contents of "Compile", ...


1

After searching a bit more using gsettings list-recursively seems I've found the shortcut path. This is it with the default shortcuts under cinnamon 2.8: gsettings list-recursively org.cinnamon.desktop.keybindings.media-keys | grep -i display org.cinnamon.desktop.keybindings.media-keys video-outputs ['p', 'XF86Display'] Removed the pesky Super+P ...


0

You can disable the searchable-scrollback feature by putting this in your .Xresources: URxvt.perl-ext-common: "default, -searchable-scrollback" Source: urxvt manpage (under perl-ext in the Resources section)


0

Try the -e python instead of && python to get gnome-terminal to run python instead of bash, see its man page


0

Base on the @Oposum's solution, I added a "fast resize" : # Resizing windows by 10 in i3 using keyboard only bindsym $mod+Ctrl+Shift+Right resize shrink width 10 px or 10 ppt bindsym $mod+Ctrl+Shift+Up resize grow height 10 px or 10 ppt bindsym $mod+Ctrl+Shift+Down resize shrink height 10 px or 10 ppt bindsym $mod+Ctrl+Shift+Left resize grow width 10 px or ...


3

bindsym $mod+j+f [class=Firefox] focus bindsym $mod+j+e [class=Emacs] focus You can get the class argument for any currently window with the following command: xprop -name <window title> | grep WM_CLASS This will return something like WM_CLASS(STRING) = "emacs", "Emacs" The second string, here Emacs is the argument for the class parameter.


6

The kernel's terminal driver (termios) interprets the special keys that can be typed to send a signal to a process, send end of file, erase characters, etc. This is basic Unix kernel functionality and very similar on most Unix and Linux implementations. The stty command displays or sets the termios special characters, as well as other parameters for the ...


-2

From http://www.skorks.com/2009/09/bash-shortcuts-for-maximum-productivity/ Command Editing Shortcuts Ctrl + a – go to the start of the command line Ctrl + e – go to the end of the command line Ctrl + k – delete from cursor to the end of the command line Ctrl + u – delete from cursor to the start of the command line Ctrl + w – delete from ...


4

Best solution that I have figured out myself: Go to ~/.i3/config and open the file. Paste following code at the end: bindsym $mod+Ctrl+Right resize shrink width 1 px or 1 ppt bindsym $mod+Ctrl+Up resize grow height 1 px or 1 ppt bindsym $mod+Ctrl+Down resize shrink height 1 px or 1 ppt bindsym $mod+Ctrl+Left resize grow width 1 px or 1 ppt Save it and ...


0

inoremap means insert mode non-recursive map. vnoremap is visual mode non-recursive map. So vnoremap jj <esc> is what you want.


0

Here's a rollup of all of the other answers into a bash script that will automatically generate .tmux.reset.conf from the default key bindings: #!/bin/bash tmux -f /dev/null -L temp start-server \; list-keys | \ sed -r \ -e "s/bind-key(\s+)([\"#~\$])(\s+)/bind-key\1\'\2\'\3/g" \ -e "s/bind-key(\s+)([\'])(\s+)/bind-key\1\"\2\"\3/g" \ -e ...



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