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On OS-X with tmux version 2.2 or later the following will work: bind-key -t emacs-copy MouseDragEnd1Pane copy-pipe "pbcopy" bind-key -t vi-copy MouseDragEnd1Pane copy-pipe "pbcopy"


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You don't need Shift + k. Using Esc + v will work since you are allowing shell command line editing using the built-in vi editor using set -o vi (same can be acheieved with Ctrl + x + e). This is equivalent to execute the builtin fc command which is useful to manipulate the history list and history file. It will invoke whatever editor is set in your $EDITOR ...


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This allows you to construct a command with full Vi editing. If you type some commands in and save exit :wq the commands will be run. CLARIFICATION: it allows you to construct the command in whatever editor you have set in $EDITOR and when you save and quit from it the contents will be run. (Clarified that it's not just Vi!) ALSO, as noted by RealSkeptic, ...


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You can do that via System Settings > Keyboard (or gnome-control-center keyboard in terminal): go to Typing and set Modifiers-only switch to next source to Caps Lock Alternatively, set the corresponding xkb option (which is what the above does underneath) via gsettings or dconf: navigate to org > gnome > desktop > input-sources and add grp:caps_toggle to ...


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Is there any good way to do that without having to list all of the currently undefined combos? You should understand that it's not simply "lock on any unknown combo". You probably don't want to block things like Control-R that lets you reverse-search your shell's history, or Control-P that opens printing dialogue in your favourite office suite. With ...


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The new folder is not created until you actually provide a name, normally by typing something in what looks like a directory/folder name in the currently open directory/folder in the manager. Once you enter that name and press return the actual call to mkdir() is executed (not the mkdir commandline command). And if you directly press Enter you often get some ...


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Try pressing Control+[ immediately followed by h. Terminals do not send key presses directly to the shell (as in Control was pressed/released). Instead the terminal sends character sequences depending on keys pressed. The keys in a sequence are to be pressed - well - in sequence, not all at once. The big exception to this are the Control-keys and the ...


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^[ actually means Escape character. Check here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII In your case it seems your ALT key works as a synonym for Escape key: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alt_key


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tmux has a table of escape-sequence patterns in the xterm-keys.c file so that it can support xterm-style modified special keys. It matches this pattern: { '\t', "\033[27;_;9~" }, to your string \033[27;5;9~ using the underscore character as a wildcard. The table maps escape sequences into things that tmux knows about: special keys, ...


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There is no standard way to ask about control-backspace. The conventional way to ask about the backspace key is in the terminal database, e.g., look at the output of tput kbs If your terminal is configured to match the TERM value, that gives the "backspace" key. Some terminals (originally rxvt, later xterm and now "several" undocumented) implement ...


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Put the commands you want to run in individual scripts and then create keyboard shortcuts to run the scripts. The clipboard formatting example would look like this. #!/bin/bash xsel -b|xsel -bi If you save that file in ~/scripts/strip-format.sh you'll need to give it executable permissions with chmod +x ~/scripts/strip-format.sh and then add your custom ...


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You could make aliases for these instead of keyboard shortcuts. On the assumption that you are using the default shell (bash), edit your ~/.bash_profile and add these lines: alias sf='xsel -b | xsel -bi' alias vpn='expressvpn connect' where you can change the names from 'sf' and 'vpn' to whatever you want. Run . ~/.bash_profile in a terminal window (or ...


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While in the middle of posting this question, I found the answer haha. I first entered the following into a terminal: $ ibus engine xkb:us::eng I then got the list of engines to find what I needed to change it to (output cropped for brevity): $ ibus list-engine language: Estonian xkb:ee::est - Estonian language: Slovak xkb:sk:qwerty:slo - Slovak ...


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Solution That I Have Settled With This issue still plagues me somewhat, but I have mashed together a multi-pronged solution that gets very close to what the original question was seeking, to the point that I am marking this issue "resolved". 1.) Remove the xorg.conf changes These changes to xorg.conf from the OP can be removed, as the functionality will ...


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Short: probably not. Applications on a X Window desktop read key symbols and interpret them on an application-specific basis. There are conventions for the key symbols (which a particular set of programs may follow), but nothing that enforces them globally.


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I cannot provide proof of any kind, but Ctrl-P and Ctrl-N belong to the emacs key bindings, in contrast to vi bindings (bindkey -e vs. bindkey -v). Under this premise, you should look for an explanation in emacs itself. emacs' tutorial tells There are several ways you can do this. You can use the arrow keys, but it's more efficient to keep your ...


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With debian or based on, you can add this option : XKBOPTIONS="terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp" to /etc/default/keyboard file


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It doesn't work as that's one of the default gnome-shell shortcuts. So gnome-shell actually grabs it even if you set it to execute some custom action. You'll have to remove it first from the default shortcuts list - easiest way is via terminal with gsettings: gsettings set org.gnome.shell.keybindings toggle-message-tray "['<Super>v']" alternatively, ...


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No, there's no KeyHold event, only KeyPress and KeyRelease. KeyPress is sent when the key is pressed, and sent again after a certain amount of time. The time can be configured with xset r (there are two times: time to first repeat, and time to subsequent repeats). A KeyRelease event is sent when the key is actually released (it is not sent while the key is ...


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That is a concise representation of the files in current directory. bash will expand it to the same as output of ls. Example - file{a,b}.txt gets expanded to filea.txt fileb.txt in bash. So, something like cp file{a,b}.txt gets expanded to cp filea.txt fileb.txt, which will copy filea.txt to fileb.txt.


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MATE Desktop Environment For me, it is Ctrl+Alt+D. You can find that via Preferences > Hardware > Keyboard and Shortcuts: Or start mate-keybinding-properties via console. Look for "Window Management" > "Hide all normal windows and set focus to the Desktop". You can change the shortcut there.


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These keys have undefined behavior to Lunbuntu/Xorg/LXDE, they worked in windows because your drivers were machine specific, these keys/ key combinations may vary among thinkpads and therefore are not covered by thinkpad_acpi The keys are not identified because either: The keycodes are not mapped to any functionality The scancodes created by those ...



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