New answers tagged

1

Also related is the KEYTIMEOUT setting, which indicates how long ZSH will wait to detect multi-key sequences, minimized by setting: KEYTIMEOUT=1 If you're feeling super extreme, you can also remove all the ESC-something binds, so that ZSH has no multi-key sequences it will waste time waiting for following the escape key being pressed. bindkey -rpM viins ...


0

After some searching, I've found the answer: To discover what escape sequence the key combination is triggering, follow this excellent answer: echo "CtrlVEsc/" Which displays, for me, as: echo "^[/". CtrlV forces the following key to display as an escape sequence instead of being interpreted. So now we know we're trying to find what is bound to "^[/". ...


2

It is probably % bindkey '^[/' "^[/" _history-complete-older % or similar. And that's how you find out. Further reading Paul Falstad (2015-12-02). "ZLE builtins". Z Shell Manual. 5.2.


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Make the Insert key send a different keysym (the symbolic name of the key that determines what key applications think it is), for example F25. xmodmap -e "keycode 106 = F25" Configure mc to recognize f25 as a binding for the Mark command: copy /etc/mc.keymap (or wherever the keymap you're using is located) to ~/.mc/mc.keymap and change the line Mark = ...


2

Most of Midnight Commander's key-bindings are customizable. The feature you're talking about appears to be Mark, which is in the default keymap file, e.g., /etc/mc.keymap: [panel] Search = ctrl-s; alt-s Mark = insert; ctrl-t According to the manual page, if you provide your own keymap file (and make that the first one found), it will use that file instead ...


0

Terminal emulators have control sequences for inserting and deleting characters (and lines) on the screen. But when you are running an application (whether a shell or a text editor), the control sequences you may enter are as a rule not echoed to the terminal. The application reads these special keys and decides what control sequences to send to the ...


1

Terminal emulators cannot edit text on their own, and hence the concept of insert mode vs. overwrite mode doesn't exist on this level. They just send the keypresses to the running application (via the kernel's tty driver), and receive (again, via the kernel tty driver) and interpret data from the application and update the screen accordingly. For the ...


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That eol setting is not for the key that would take you to the end of some line-editing buffer, that's a setting of the tty line discipline. It is for its very basic line editor, the one used when entering input for applications (like cat, sed) that don't have their own line editor. That editor doesn't have cursor positioning, the only editing it can do is ...


0

Did you look at http://geany-users.466218.n3.nabble.com/Geany-Users-How-to-Set-Custom-Commands-in-Geany-tp4025693p4025696.html? From there: Hi, 1. Open Set Custom Commands dialog 2. Click Add button 3. Type command name where the cursor is 4. Press Enter (required to save the command) 5. Click on same row under Label column 6. Type a name/label for the ...


2

The behavior of C-m, C-i, etc. is implemented by bash, but the fact that they're the same thing as Return, Tab, etc. is due to the behavior of the terminal. All terminals behave like this because all terminals have always behaved like this and it's what applications expect. The interface between a terminal and an application is based on characters (in fact, ...


0

Two questions, two points: control/J, control/M and control/I are common ASCII controls which most programs assume. bash simply makes it easy to rebind those in readline. most programs which accept special keys such as left-arrow provide a way to recognize the escape key distinguished from those special keys by timing. You probably cannot type fast ...


0

On OS-X with tmux version 2.2 or later the following will work: bind-key -t emacs-copy MouseDragEnd1Pane copy-pipe "pbcopy" bind-key -t vi-copy MouseDragEnd1Pane copy-pipe "pbcopy"


12

You don't need Shift + k. Using Esc + v will work since you are allowing shell command line editing using the built-in vi editor using set -o vi (same can be acheieved with Ctrl + x + e). This is equivalent to execute the builtin fc command which is useful to manipulate the history list and history file. It will invoke whatever editor is set in your $EDITOR ...


10

This allows you to construct a command with full Vi editing. If you type some commands in and save exit :wq the commands will be run. CLARIFICATION: it allows you to construct the command in whatever editor you have set in $EDITOR and when you save and quit from it the contents will be run. (Clarified that it's not just Vi!) ALSO, as noted by RealSkeptic, ...


2

You can do that via System Settings > Keyboard (or gnome-control-center keyboard in terminal): go to Typing and set Modifiers-only switch to next source to Caps Lock Alternatively, set the corresponding xkb option (which is what the above does underneath) via gsettings or dconf: navigate to org > gnome > desktop > input-sources and add grp:caps_toggle to ...


0

Is there any good way to do that without having to list all of the currently undefined combos? You should understand that it's not simply "lock on any unknown combo". You probably don't want to block things like Control-R that lets you reverse-search your shell's history, or Control-P that opens printing dialogue in your favourite office suite. With ...


2

The new folder is not created until you actually provide a name, normally by typing something in what looks like a directory/folder name in the currently open directory/folder in the manager. Once you enter that name and press return the actual call to mkdir() is executed (not the mkdir commandline command). And if you directly press Enter you often get some ...


2

Try pressing Control+[ immediately followed by h. Terminals do not send key presses directly to the shell (as in Control was pressed/released). Instead the terminal sends character sequences depending on keys pressed. The keys in a sequence are to be pressed - well - in sequence, not all at once. The big exception to this are the Control-keys and the ...


1

^[ actually means Escape character. Check here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII In your case it seems your ALT key works as a synonym for Escape key: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alt_key


0

tmux has a table of escape-sequence patterns in the xterm-keys.c file so that it can support xterm-style modified special keys. It matches this pattern: { '\t', "\033[27;_;9~" }, to your string \033[27;5;9~ using the underscore character as a wildcard. The table maps escape sequences into things that tmux knows about: special keys, ...



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