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2

A simple solution is to suspend the running command, usually by typing control-Z. You should then be back in the shell. Give the fg command to return and bring the command back to the foreground again.


0

And improved version of @Leif answer could be: tmux bind-key '[' run "tmux copy-mode; tmux bind-key -n ']' run \"tmux send-keys Enter; tmux save-buffer - | xclip -i -selection clipboard; tmux unbind-key -n ']'\"; tmux bind-key -n q run \"tmux unbind -n ']'; tmux send-keys q\"; tmux bind-key -n C-c run \"tmux unbind -n ']'; tmux send-keys C-c\"" This way ...


11

Ctrl+M sends the same character(RET) as the Enter key in terminal. Programs have no way to tell them apart, so these keys cannot be configured separately. Ctrl+Q is already used for XON by default, so it cannot be used by Bash, but you should still be able to use it in tmux, because tmux uses raw input mode. A GUI program could read from the keyboard, that ...


2

There is a "Reset" toolbar command to the right of compile. That will stop the running program in Dr. Java.


1

I think it's name is "Toogle Scale" on the keyboard shortcuts settings


0

Solution found first must press CTRL+V and key in my case is F9 so i did CTRL+V F9 and return this ^[[20~ Now i know is key 20 and i bind it to tilde bind '"\e[20~":"~"' I try if work pressing F9 and return tilde I put this in $HOME/.profile for permanent change


-2

it is as simple as typing "ls | pbcopy" (without quotes). The downside is you can not paste it into a terminal window, it thinks you want to press enter after each filename pasted. But you can paste them into a document.


1

For GTK 2, add the following line to ~/.gtkrc-2.0: gtk-auto-mnemonic = 0 For GTK 3 up to GTK 3.9: do_dconf /org/gnome/desktop/interface/automatic-mnemonics false In GTK 3.10, the option was removed (in this commit, whose log message just states that the feature was removed). Looking at the source, there's no way to turn it on. The crazy behavior of ...


1

You can re-enable Ctrl+Alt+Bksp on a per-user basis by adding the option terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp to gnome xkb-options via gsettings or dconf-editor. The easiest way is with dconf-editor - go to org > gnome > desktop > input-sources and add terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp to the xkb-options, e.g With gsettings it's a bit more complicated. You'll have to get the ...


1

tput tells you what the terminal advertises as its function keys. Terminals often don't advertise all the function keys and keychords that they support. To see what escape sequences the terminal actually sends, use the Ctrl+V method mentioned in that same answer: press Ctrl+V in a terminal application that doesn't rebind the Ctrl+V key (such as the shell). ...


1

Indeed, Graphics.X11.ExtraTypes.XF86 does not appear to provide an XF86XK_AudioMicMute KeySym. Either this was an oversight (maybe the MicMute key keysym was added after the Haskell module was written) or an intentional decision (perhaps because the Mic Mute key is so uncommon). Either way, luckily, there is a way to bind keys in Haskell without a KeySym: ...


2

The global ones are in ~/.kde4/share/config/kglobalshortcutsrc. Different apps/services may have specific ones in their own config files - many in the same dir. Note: the ~/.kde4 path is seen on OpenSUSE, on other distributions the path may exist under ~/.kde instead.


1

I figured out that xmodmap was the correct solution here. In the .Xmodmap file, turn off shift, then add right shift as mode switch and add left shift as shift: clear Shift keysym Shift_R = Mode_switch add Shift = Shift_L Now the order of the first few keysym columns is key, left_shift+key, right_shift+key. So for my parentheses example: keycode 18 = 9 ...


2

As i mentioned in the comments normaly you can easily select the text to copy the text and paste it with the third mouse button. The third button is the middle button, if you have no middle button use both buttons. But if you wish to use the shortcuts and you use xterm with awesome, than you can adjust your .Xresource file in your home directory. Add this ...


0

What I ended up doing was going into the Windows settings and changing the "Special key to move and resize windows" to Super (the windows button) instead of Alt.


1

I am using Cinnamon on Linux Mint 17.1. In my Gnome Terminal this works Ctrl+Shift+U then A, E, Space. (Enter works as well) to get the Registered symbol ® ( <- and firefox works as well), for which the unicode hex value is AE. I don't recall ever enabling this, so it looks like there is something missing on your setup.


0

Ok so I had a little figuring out myself and ended up coming across this of getting it to work with what I wanted in mind, it could be improved on to make it better though, perhaps shorter lines of code? #!/bin/bash ## RapidFire key modifier for games. ## if you need it to work for something other then ## edit the search parameter name to focus ...


0

I don't usually use gnome (I installed Ubuntu and just use unity), but when I used gnome I set custom shortcuts, and I've done some reading around to check. Some OSs may need dconf instead of gconf. The answer here shows how to change keyboard shortcuts using gconf-editor. You need to select the unwanted shortcut in gnome tweak-tools or gconf-editor and ...


1

As it is clear that there is no "vanilla" i3 way to do this, I have created a small preprocessor called i3bang that allows me to achieve this. Simply Download and set up i3bang. Wrap all of your keybindings in default mode like so: !@<+default_keybindings bindsym ... > Now include a reference to that section at the end of the mode you would like ...



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