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You might want to try tmux-yank plugin. It enables copying straight to system clipboard (OS X and Linux) and some other goodies like yanking the current shell line.


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I can suggest the following script. #!/bin/sh mk_google_query() { url_encode() { # http://stackoverflow.com/a/298258/3541063 perl -MURI::Escape -e 'print uri_escape($ARGV[0]);' "$1" } echo "http://google.com/search?q=`url_encode "$1"`" } SEARCH_TEXT=`xsel` xdg-open `mk_google_query "$SEARCH_TEXT"` This script uses xsel to ...


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The solution happen to be very easy and straight forward. It will help you to open a browser, paste text from your clipboard to Google Search - all with one little script, that can be and must be attached to a keyboard shortcut. What we need, is a small utility called xsel and few lines in BASH script. Example: #!/bin/bash CLIPBOARD=$(/usr/bin/xsel ...


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Different bash commands use different notions of word. Check the description of each command in the manual. C-w kills to the previous whitespace. M-DEL (usually Alt+BackSpace) kills to the previous word boundary where words contain only letters and digits (the same as M-b and M-f), and M-d kills forward similarly. Bash uses the Readline library to process ...


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This is a result of the way readline treats "words". Altd is a shortcut for kill-word: Kill from point the end of the current word, or if between words, to the end of the next word. Word boundaries are the same as those used by M-f (forward-word). Word boundaries in forward-word are defined thus: Words are composed of letters and digits. Whereas Ctrlw is ...


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I had similar problem. Actually I couldn't even change my shortcuts from the Window Manager -> Keyboard. The settings didn't save after I close the Window Manager. My solution was to remove (or just move) the Linux Mint's shortcut settings: mv /usr/share/mint-configuration-xfce/xfce4/xfconf/xfce-perchannel-xml/xfce4-keyboard-shortcuts.xml{,.BAK} and ...


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Ctrl+W is the shortcut to close the current document or tab in many applications. I don't know where it originated (at a guess, Mac), but it's become a standard in most major environments, including Gnome, KDE, OSX and Microsoft Office. Mnemonic: W is next to Q on QWERTY keyboards; Ctrl+Q is for quit, and Ctrl+W is for a lesser form of quitting. Some ...


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Okay, so I managed to solve it - maybe it's not the most elegant way but it works and it's good enough. First I wrote a small script: #!/bin/sh i3lock -i ~/Pictures/lock.png Saved it (e.g. .locker) to the HOME address, then I ran "chmod +x .locker" so I could execute it and at the Custom Shortcuts to the Command line I wrote ./.locker Choose an ...


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It's application-dependent... I'm not sure one can say the majority has that shortcut, since it's unlikely one has used the majority of applications. As an example, xpdf uses Ctrl+W to close the current file. I'm haunted by the Ctrl+F, Ctrl+W, / for "search" confusion. I wish there was a de facto standard on *nix for that, and other things such as -r vs -R ...


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To support Ctrl-arrows in xterm, set the modifyKeyboard resource to at least 2. For instance: xterm -xrm "*modifyKeyboard: 2" If this doesn't have the expected behavior, perhaps your application (its key bindings) is not correctly configured. Or you can also try to modify the modifyCursorKeys resource, e.g. xterm -xrm "*modifyKeyboard: 2" -xrm ...


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i use the default terminal in ubuntu 14 (bash) and to scroll by page it is SHIFT + PAGEUP or SHIFT + PAGEDOWN to go up/down a whole page or CONTROL + SHIFT + UP or CONTROL + SHIFT + DOWN to go up/down by line.


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It's prompting for a string to search for in your input history. From the bash readline documentation non-incremental-forward-search-history (M-n) Search forward starting at the current line and moving ‘down’ through the the history as necessary using a non-incremental search for a string supplied by the user. So if you've cycled back through your ...


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By combining: Stéphane Chazelas comment this question https://stackoverflow.com/questions/25166223/open-firefox-new-tab-in-same-window-through-terminal sh command cause it wouldn't work otherwise I got it to work by adding to keyboard shortcuts (not xbindkeys). So all the steps are: Control center --> scroll down to Keyboard Shortcuts --> Press Add and ...


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For all you Mac iterm2 users: You can bind ⌘+R to 0x0C 0x10 0x0d. This will clear the terminal and run the last command.


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This link might be helpful for you. I can't found what you want exactly but this snippet can toggle maximize a window: <keybind key="A-Return"> <action name="ToggleMaximize"/> </keybind>


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I just found it. I use CTRL + ALT to switch keyboard layout. If I change that to something else, then all the CTRL + ALT shortcuts works as it should. Must be a bug then.



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