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You should go to Settings / Keyboard / Shortcuts and find the tab labeled shortcuts, then add new shortcut, name your shortcut Launch New Terminal and add the command gnome-terminal &. After the shortcut is added, highlight the newly-minted custom shortcut and press the unique key combination of your choice. I personally use Ctrl+Alt+T.


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Go to keyboard shortcut at System Tools -->Preferences-->System Settings-->keyboard-->shortcut Custom shortcuts add + Name: gnome-terminal Command :gnome-terminal ctrl+alt+t quickly try that


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This is probably a bug, similar or identical to this one (Super-P mapped for display in BIOS), only that on my laptop the display button is not Fn-F8, but F4. What I do not like is not that the command for switching displays (XF68Display) matches also the "p" key, but that it matches Super-P: I want Super to be reserved for Menu Search ...


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Function keys can be interpreted by the window manager or terminal emulator (you'll find that F11, for example, will usually maximize the window) or passed through to the program as VTxxx or ANSI escape sequences. F9 on Linux and Solaris usually sends ESC[20~. Depending on the versions of the software, bash or ksh will interpret this as either 0~ or ~. On ...


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I don't know what makes you think F9 returning a tilde is "correct", but if you want a tilde, you should use the tilde key. Function keys are mostly undefined, based on the differences in the client-side hardware you are using, the client-side software you are using, the server-side software you are using, and the server-side hardware you are using.


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There are two sides to the question, the technical side and the historical side. The technical answer is because bash uses GNU Readline. In readline Control-a is bound to the function beginning-of-line, you can show this with: $ bind -q beginning-of-line beginning-of-line can be invoked via "\C-a", "\M-OH", "\M-[1~", "\M-[7~", "\M-[H". where \C-a means ...


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Had version 3.03 installed. At least here .xpdfrc was opened and read, according to strace, but no settings had any effect. Downloaded and tested version 3.04 and here bindings work fine. Quick to do: wget ftp://ftp.foolabs.com/pub/xpdf/xpdf-3.04.tar.gz tar xzvf xpdf-3.04.tar.gz cd xpdf-3.04 Install FreeType 2 dev and Motif dev. For debian and the like ...


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Because Richard Stallman likes Emacs. Ctrl+a is jumping to the start of the line in Emacs, and libreadline uses the same key bindings as Emacs. Bash uses libreadline.


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Install dconf-editor $ sudo apt-get install dconf-editor Open dconf-editor $ dconf-editor Navigate to the terminal key org->cinnamon->desktop->applications->terminal Change the key to the terminal you want Name=exec => Value=konsole EXTRA: Remember to install that terminal you want by default first. (Obviously) sudo apt-get ...


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#!/usr/bin/expect -f spawn passwd username expect "New password:" send -- "user-password\r" expect "Retype new password:" send -- "user-password\r" expect eof Testing I saved it as script.exp and when I run the script, this is the output I get in my machine. expect script.exp spawn passwd ramesh Changing password for user ramesh. New password: Retype ...


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I found I had to hit CTRL-v, let go, then the Home or End key to get the sequences ^[[H and ^[[F for Home and End respectively. Adding the following lines to the .zshrc file solved the problem for me: bindkey '^[[H' beginning-of-line bindkey '^[[F' end-of-line


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What part of linux handles and resolves these shortcuts? For the most part, individual applications or a window manager(WM)/desktop environment(DE). There are a few caught and handled by the kernel, such as VT switching with Cntl-Alt-F[N]. The actual event propagates: From the kernel To the Xorg server To the WM/DE To the application If caught and ...


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Think of your desktop as running a variety of programs always, even if they have no windows, terminals, or show up as daemons. Most are running a window manager, perhaps various toolbars, a desktop, and so forth. Now let's see what happens when a key is pressed. The key press and key release are treated separately, though a library may deal with combining ...


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If you use xbindkeys and have xdotool utility installed, you can add the following lines to your ~/.xbindkeysrc to enable win+left and win+right to move current active window to the left/right half of the screen: "xdotool windowsize $(xdotool getwindowfocus) 50% 100% && xdotool windowmove $(xdotool getwindowfocus) 0 y" Mod2+Mod4 + Left "xdotool ...



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