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12

You don't need Shift + k. Using Esc + v will work since you are allowing shell command line editing using the built-in vi editor using set -o vi (same can be acheieved with Ctrl + x + e). This is equivalent to execute the builtin fc command which is useful to manipulate the history list and history file. It will invoke whatever editor is set in your $EDITOR ...


10

This allows you to construct a command with full Vi editing. If you type some commands in and save exit :wq the commands will be run. CLARIFICATION: it allows you to construct the command in whatever editor you have set in $EDITOR and when you save and quit from it the contents will be run. (Clarified that it's not just Vi!) ALSO, as noted by RealSkeptic, ...


5

That eol setting is not for the key that would take you to the end of some line-editing buffer, that's a setting of the tty line discipline. It is for its very basic line editor, the one used when entering input for applications (like cat, sed) that don't have their own line editor. That editor doesn't have cursor positioning, the only editing it can do is ...


3

Make the Insert key send a different keysym (the symbolic name of the key that determines what key applications think it is), for example F25. xmodmap -e "keycode 106 = F25" Configure mc to recognize f25 as a binding for the Mark command: copy /etc/mc.keymap (or wherever the keymap you're using is located) to ~/.mc/mc.keymap and change the line Mark = ...


2

The behavior of C-m, C-i, etc. is implemented by bash, but the fact that they're the same thing as Return, Tab, etc. is due to the behavior of the terminal. All terminals behave like this because all terminals have always behaved like this and it's what applications expect. The interface between a terminal and an application is based on characters (in fact, ...


2

Most of Midnight Commander's key-bindings are customizable. The feature you're talking about appears to be Mark, which is in the default keymap file, e.g., /etc/mc.keymap: [panel] Search = ctrl-s; alt-s Mark = insert; ctrl-t According to the manual page, if you provide your own keymap file (and make that the first one found), it will use that file instead ...


2

It is probably % bindkey '^[/' "^[/" _history-complete-older % or similar. And that's how you find out. Further reading Paul Falstad (2015-12-02). "ZLE builtins". Z Shell Manual. 5.2.


1

Also related is the KEYTIMEOUT setting, which indicates how long ZSH will wait to detect multi-key sequences, minimized by setting: KEYTIMEOUT=1 If you're feeling super extreme, you can also remove all the ESC-something binds, so that ZSH has no multi-key sequences it will waste time waiting for following the escape key being pressed. bindkey -rpM viins ...


1

Terminal emulators cannot edit text on their own, and hence the concept of insert mode vs. overwrite mode doesn't exist on this level. They just send the keypresses to the running application (via the kernel's tty driver), and receive (again, via the kernel tty driver) and interpret data from the application and update the screen accordingly. For the ...



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