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Ctrl+M sends the same character(RET) as the Enter key in terminal. Programs have no way to tell them apart, so these keys cannot be configured separately. Ctrl+Q is already used for XON by default, so it cannot be used by Bash, but you should still be able to use it in tmux, because tmux uses raw input mode. A GUI program could read from the keyboard, that ...


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You'll have to define a new option. First, make a new symbol file e.g. /usr​/share​/X11​/xkb​/symbols/bksp with the following content: partial alphanumeric_keys xkb_symbols "bksp_escape" { key <BKSP> { [ Escape ] }; }; Then create the new option like this: bksp:bksp_escape = +bksp(bksp_escape) (where bksp is the name of the symbol file ...


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A simple solution is to suspend the running command, usually by typing control-Z. You should then be back in the shell. Give the fg command to return and bring the command back to the foreground again.


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There is a "Reset" toolbar command to the right of compile. That will stop the running program in Dr. Java.


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The command stty -a will show you all keyboard shortcuts in your current terminal. Generally in Unix-like systems, the only signals mapped are Ctrl+C (SIGINT), Ctrl+\ (SIGQUIT), and Ctrl+Z (SIGTSTP). There are no other bindings to other signals, and therefore no other signals that you can send within your current session with the keyboard. Generally ...


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In your .tmux.conf file located in your user's home directory you can change or add keyboard shortcuts to your tmux sessions. If this file doesn't exist you can just create it. There are lots of sample .tmux.conf files around the web and several good gists out there. If all you want to do is make comma or dot cycle to previous or next window add the ...


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A solution for X11 is described in the post by @Jav. Remapping the keys in the Linux console: read the docs: man 5 keymaps dump the current mappings to a file with dumpkeys run showkey to find the keycodes for the keys you want to remap change the relevant entries in the file produced by dumpkeys install the new mappings with loadkeys. Steps 2., 3., and ...


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I suggest you use xmodmap which works only with X. In a file (for example: ~/.Xmodmap), write something like this: keycode 0x63 = Up keycode 0x69 = Down You just have to execute xmodmap ~/.Xmodmap to enable your new configuration. Here you will find a list of all the keycode and to what key they correspond.


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I ended up using xcape, a utility designed to do exactly this: xcape allows you to use a modifier key as another key when pressed and released on its own. Note that it is slightly slower than pressing the original key, because the pressed event does not occur until the key is released. Quoted from the xcape readme Using xcape, you can assign the ...


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I think it's name is "Toogle Scale" on the keyboard shortcuts settings


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I had the same question/problem. Alt-LeftArrow and Alt-RightArrow didn't do anything for me. They just printed ^[[C and ^[[D on the screen. Mine ended up being Ctrl-Alt-F3. It varied depending on number of ttys that were configured in /etc/ttys. I had 2 uncommented ttys, so it was Ctrl-Alt-F3. When I uncommented another tty, it became Ctrl-Alt-F4.



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