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5

Perhaps your confusion arises from not having used an actual terminal. Back when serious computers were the size of several upright refrigerators, a terminal communicated with a central computer over a serial cable using characters and characters only. The characters were part of some standardized character set, e.g. ASCII or EBCDIC, but typically ASCII. ...


2

You probably have SysRq combinations disabled. There are a few things that must be true for this to work: You must have CONFIG_MAGIC_SYSRQ enabled in your kernel configuration. You must have the kernel.sysrq sysctl set to a value that enables interpreting SysRq combinations. kernel.sysrq is a bitmask to enable/disable functions: 0 - Completely disabled ...


2

You can also use below bind key: bind -m vi-insert '".": yank-last-arg' or: bind -m vi-insert ".":insert-last-argument To get the nth arguments: bind -m vi-command '"\e-": yank-nth-arg' Now you can use <ALT>n <ALT>- to get nth argument from previous command.


2

Terminals transmit characters (more precisely: bytes), not keys. When you press a key or a keychord like Ctrl+;, this information has to be encoded into a sequence of bytes. Keychords that represent a character, like A or Shift+A or À, are sent as that character: a, A, à (the last one being one or two bytes depending on the terminal's character encoding). ...


1

No, but there's an open bug asking for this: https://bugzilla.gnome.org/show_bug.cgi?id=730157


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As I remember ZorinOS is based on Ubuntu, so you can use kxneur (the PuntoSwitcher linux analog). Yes, the main goal the program is automatic choice and switch to the right keyboard layout but it has additional very useful features like completitions and hotkey ordering. https://launchpad.net/xneur stable repo: ...


1

Normally when you press a button, the keyboard generates a single keycode. The OS receives keycodes, applies some key mapping, and tries to handle key combinations independently of the underlying hardware. The SysRq mechanism is a little bit different: The keyboard catches the combination and sends a special keycode to the OS as if the single button was ...


1

Readline already has vi-fword and vi-bword which use whitespace as word boundaries so there's no need for Gilles's forward_whitespace_word function. vi-fword followed by unix-word-rubout (\C-w) deletes a whitespace-delimited word backward (including trailing spaces). bind '"\eb":vi-bword' bind '"\ef":vi-fword' bind '"\ed":"\ef\C-w"' vi-backward-word is ...


1

Without extension you can only disable some of it: A can be disabled by disabling the Archive functionality in genereal, this has to be done in each Mail-Account under Copies and Folders->Keep messages archives in: J can be disabled by disabling the Junk functionality, which is not a desired solution. A better solution is the old-but-still-functioning ...


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You can disable the "a" problem in disabling archives in general. Edit -> Preferences -> Advanced -> General -> mail.identity.default.archive_enabled -> false


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Question is old, but for anyone reading it: escape grave definekey top Insert readkey root definekey root Insert link grave This will effectively change C-t to the grave key. I don't know what the windows key is called. Don't remember where I got this, but it works.


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I've had the same problem in Linux Mint 17 XFCE, and the only solution I've found so far was to: Uninstall xfce4-whiskermenu-plugin Log out Reinstall xfce4-whiskermenu-plugin <-- this step is vital! The entry with Super L will still show up in the Application shortcut window, but it is actually disabled. I hope it works for you too.


1

I had the same problem with Ctrl+Z and Ctrl+Y, including a corresponding xev output with "KeymapNotify event". The solution was: Assign a new keyboard shortcut to exactly that combinations with xfce4-keyboard-settings and delete them afterwards. After that Ctrl+Z (undo) and Ctrl+Y (redo) worked again.



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