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Running reset clears the terminal display and also resets all input settings to their default. In particular, it sets the input mode to cooked, i.e. the terminal reads one line at a time before sending the whole line to the application (here, the application is bash). The terminal's line editor is an extremely primitive one that only understands backspace, ...


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You can make a script that does the following: xdotool key super+d wmctrl -s <desktop#> and bind that to the key you want. You probably have to install packages before you can use the commands (sudo apt-get install xdotool wmctrl on Debian based systems). As a bash script moving back to the first window (counting starts at 0): #!/bin/bash xdotool ...


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The ^ in ^r in ASCII text files normally stands for pressing Ctrl plus the following key. In that combination it is more customary to use the lowercase keys, and not the uppercase versions as they appear on (most) keyboards. Thus: ^r → Ctrl+R ^l → Ctrl+L


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You can list all currently active keybinds in tcsh with the bindkey command: % bindkey Standard key bindings "^@" -> set-mark-command "^A" -> beginning-of-line "^B" -> backward-char "^C" -> tty-sigintr ... etc ... In this output, ^[ is the escape character this is Esc followed by your key (eg. p). ...


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Assuming you are referring to caja, the default file manager on Cinnamon, you can get the path by pressing Ctrl + L and you can open a terminal by right clicking and selecting the relevant option: The screenshot above was taken on Cinnamon 2.2.16 and caja caja 1.8.2.


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Settings manager >> keyboard >> shortcuts tab, click add, enter the command: $ setxkbmap -layout (languageKey) this will switch to one language only but you can set a key for each language or you could create your own file to toggle when the key binding is pressed



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