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10

Depending on how the terminal is configured, typing Alt+Key is like typing the Esc and Key keys in sequence, so it sends the ESC character (aka \e or ^[ or \033) followed by the character or sequence of characters sent upon pressing that Key. Upon pressing Up, most terminal emulators send either the three characters \033[A or \033OA depending on whether ...


8

Available Keys Look at man tmux, search / for KEY BINDINGS: tmux allows a command to be bound to most keys, with or without a prefix key. When specifying keys, most represent themselves (for example ‘A’ to ‘Z’). Ctrl keys may be prefixed with ‘C-’ or ‘^’, and Alt (meta) with ‘M-’. In addition, the following special key names are accepted: ...


7

You can map any command in insert mode to anything using the :imap command, or save typing by using :im. For your first mapping, you could type (in normal mode): :im <C-A> <esc>^i Which goes to normal mode (with escape), presses ^ for you and goes back to insert mode. See the help for more info: :help :imap or shorter: :h :im Do note that you ...


7

All listed keys by you are used. You can inspect a key in vim with :help: :help <key> for example: :help v or checkout this vim cheat sheet.


6

Try this (as a partial example): bind -n S-Right next-window bind -n S-Left previous-window That should be enough to make it easy to get the other 2 settings working too. It works on my tmux installation (1.4) but YMMV. You can also use the meta key (option on Macs, alt on PCs): bind-key -n M-Right next-window bind-key -n M-Left previous-window If ...


6

If you take a look at the ANSI ASCII standard, the lower part of the character set (the first 32) are reserved "control characters" (sometimes referred to as "escape sequences"). These are things like the NUL character, Life Feed, Carriage Return, Tab, Bell, etc. The vast majority can be emulated by pressing the Ctrl key in combination with another key. The ...


6

You can re-map keys with xmodmap. E.g.: xmodmap -e "keycode 79 = i I" To find correct keycode and alias use xev. Looking around a bit: this should give you needed details about persistent configuration etc.


4

Not a complete answer, but are you aware of Vim's so-called "easy mode" (vim -y)? It is always in edit mode by defaut, and does quite a lot of what you want, and doesn't need you to install or customise anything. It does CTRL-A, C, V, X, Y etc. From the key-listing: Key mappings: <Down> moves by screen lines rather than file lines ...


4

It's not possible with key bindings. Ctrl-G is hardcoded in mutt at a lower level than the macro or keybinding processing (see mutt_getch() in mutt's source code, at the core of all user input in mutt that returns an error upon ^G). macro editor \e '^G' wouldn't work either. What you can do is configure your terminal to send ^G upon pressing Escape With ...


4

I got all the pieces together to do the trick. The best way is to create a custom mapping for all the commands: map <F8> :let mycurf=expand("<cfile>")<cr><c-w> w :execute("e ".mycurf)<cr><c-w>p Explanation: map <F8> maps on "F8" the commands that follow let mycurf=expand("<cfile>") gets the filename ...


4

Yes, Gnome and KDE provide some of their own keyboard shortcuts in addition to the ones provided by their respective WMs. However, this may not mean what you think. The fact that Fn + UpArrow produces the keysym XF86AudioRaiseVolume is mainly due to your laptop's keyboard. You can verify this by using xev again (in the Openbox environment); It should have ...


4

Take a look at this similar question over at superuser. Something like "xdotool key Home" End + Up in the .xbindkeysrc file should suffice. If you really want to try to use xmodmap, a start would be to map either the End key or the Up key to a modifier key in .Xmodmap. For example, you could grab your two keys with xev and map the End key to ...


4

I think I know what's going on. You've not configured vim to disable vi compatibility mode. In vi, you can only press the arrow keys in command mode. When in insert mode, the character sequences sent upon pressing the arrow keys are treated as if the characters were entered individually. Now, upon startup, vi sets the terminal in keypad transmit mode ...


4

There is no scheme, screen, like any terminal application, doesn't deal with keystrokes, but with characters or sequences of characters which it reads from a terminal device. It's the terminal (or terminal emulator like xterm) that transforms a keystroke into a character or sequence of characters which it sends over a wire (the wire being virtual in the ...


4

One possibility is that ibus is trapping control-space. From http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=208&t=169930#p873888, here are directions to disable trapping of that key sequence in linux mint 17 (Qiana): Right-click the keyboard icon in the upper right corner of you Cinamon UI, and click preference. This should open the ibus preference. ...


4

The interface between a terminal application and a terminal emulator (or hardware terminal) transmits bytes, not keys. Function keys such as cursor movement keys are translated into escape sequences (beginning with the escape character ESC a.k.a. \e a.k.a. \033 a.k.a. 0x1b a.k.a. ^[). The same goes for combinations of a function key or a character key with ...


4

This post describes how I approach WMI debugging based on the DSDT from your acpidump (SSDT does not contain relevant details here). \_SB.AMW0 is the WMI device in your Dell ACPI firmware. The \EV4 method calls \WMNF which is the only method that calls on the \_SB.AMW0 device (function SWEV = Set? WMI Event). \EV4 is the method that is called by the ...


4

There's one big issue here: under the linux console there's no way to distinguish Ctrl-Down from Down, they both send the same ^[[B sequence. To make it work we'd need to find a hack for the linux console to change that. Not pretty, but if you care enough about it it might be possible. Otherwise, how about using another key binding ? Say Alt-/, Just need ...


3

You can use Crtl+v to return input codes of your keyboard. If you do that for arrow keys, you will get [[D^, [[C^, [[A^, and [[B values. There aren't any default bindings for Alt+arrow keys, so it seems that performed action is printing letter code alone. Hovewer, if you create your local version of readline library configuration file: $ cp /etc/inputrc ...


3

The closest equivalent would be to run the xmodmap program each time you log in. Put the following snippet in a file called .Xmodmap in your home directory: keycode 66 = Return clear Lock You can see the key codes and current associated key names by running xev from a terminal. Press Caps Lock while the xev window is focused, and you'll see a something ...


3

For reference, here's archive.org's copy of the (dead) link in OP's question. The codes shown therein are emacs lisp style codes. I don't know much about them. Of course, there's more than one way to skin a cat, but what follows is probably the easiest: First, use showkey -a to get the hexadecimal representation for your keyboard sequence. For example, when ...


3

See this wikia.com article for the exact thing you're tyring to do: http://vim.wikia.com/wiki/Map_Ctrl-S_to_save_current_or_new_files In a nutshell you need to do the following. 1. Add this to ~/.vimrc " If the current buffer has never been saved, it will have no name, " call the file browser to save it, otherwise just save it. nnoremap <silent> ...


3

You need to include a colon to select based on index. Try this: bind-key u select-window -t :2


3

You should be able to disable PrntScr on the console with a custom keymap. I'm using Archlinux and the procedure is described here: Configuring the Console Keymap (it should be similar for other distros). Now, at step 4, edit your personal.map: Switch to a tty, run showkey and press PrntScr to get the key code. On my system the output is: keycode 99 press ...


3

Terminal line control can be queried and/or set by stty. To see the current settings, use stty -a. The manpages provide details. For example, from stty -a you might find this kill-line control: kill = ^U The caret means hold the control key (Ctrl) and then type the character shown (U). To change the line-kill sequence, you could do: $ stty kill \@ ...


3

I found it. It was moved to the regional preferences section: Go to settings > regional preferences > keyboard layouts > settings and expand the caps lock section.


3

You can accomplish this with xmodmap. Add the following to ~/.xmodmap: remove Lock = Caps_Lock keysym Caps_Lock = Control_L add Control = Control_L and run the command xmodmap ~/.xmodmap. You can put this command in whatever startup files are processed by your WM or DE. This will only work in X but it will work regardless of what graphical environment ...


3

I think part of your solution starts with using the -K switch to rdesktop. -K Do not override window manager key bindings. By default rdesktop attempts to grab all keyboard input when it is in focus. patch Also I found this thread titled: Thread: rdesktop - ignore certain key combinationswhere one of the posters mentioned that he made a ...


3

You could install xbacklight, a utility for managing your brightness using RandR. Then, to activate it, use a simple script along these lines—bound to your two keys: #!/usr/bin/env bash up() { xbacklight -inc 10 } down() { xbacklight -dec 10 } notify() { bright=$(&lt;/sys/class/backlight/acpi_video0/actual_brightness) if [[ ...


2

I fixed this problem (posted by me) re-installing the alsa-utils. I don't know if this is the solution, but it works for me.



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