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Found a solution that works: sudo blkid and copy your swap UUID to clipboard sudo vim /boot/grub/menu.lst, search for resume= and add resume=UUID=xxxxx-xxxxx-xxx-xxxx-xxxx update grub with sudo update-grub That worked once and never again. Still looking.


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The kernel name ist defined by the ident line in the kernel conf file. The KERNCONF variable defines which kernelconf file to use. The "Device Probe and Attach" section in the FreeBSD architecture handbook describes how a usb device is detected: https://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/arch-handbook/usb-devprobe.html


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"make modules_install install" tries to build initrd image on /boot partition, which has 162 megabytes free, which is simply not enough. If you want to compile kernel yourself on Ubuntu, you need to prepare at least 1GB free space on /boot partition.


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I believe this will give you what you want: (cat /proc/filesystems | awk '{print $NF}' | sed '/^$/d'; ls -1 /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/kernel/fs) | sort -u Explanation Based on my best understanding: cat /proc/filesystems | awk '{print $NF}' | sed '/^$/d' gives you all the filesystems that are natively supported by the kernel (like sysfs) along with ...


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There are two ways to pass arguments to kernel: 1. Compile them inside. 2. Use bootloader So first check if your arguments are not compiled into kernel. Second setenv command you've found in not a bash command but boot loader command. It depends on how particular device made, but usually there is a partition in some internal storage (flash memory of your ...


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You can use a uEnv.txt file in your boot partition to specify arguments for the boot. This is an example for Xilinx zynq-7000 devices from the yocto meta-zybo layer: kernel_image=uImage devicetree_image=zybo-zynq7.dtb bootargs=console=ttyPS0,115200 root=/dev/mmcblk0p2 rw rootwait earlyprintk uenvcmd=echo Copying Linux from SD to RAM... && fatload ...


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vmlinux: A non-compressed and non-bootable Linux kernel file format, just an intermediate step to producing vmlinuz. vmlinuz: A compressed and bootable Linux kernel file. It is actually zImage or bzImage file. zImage: For old kernels, just fit 640k ram size. bzImage: Big zImage, no 640k ram size limit, can much larger. Please refer this ...


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Seems you need to (cross) compile a new kernel.


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Your question is stated in a rather chaotic way, but this is what I understand: You're talking about enabling your wireless network adapter using a command that requires root privileges (hence run using sudo). The command you're executing actually removes a module (see man modprobe under the -r option). It was probably suggested that you remove the ...


3

If you want to know the driver for your internal USB : lspci| grep USB This will list you the USB devices like : 00:14.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family USB xHCI Host Controller (rev 04) 00:1a.0 USB controller: Intel Corporation 7 Series/C210 Series Chipset Family USB Enhanced Host Controller #2 (rev 04) 00:1d.0 USB ...


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you can try dmesg | grep usb mine have the line: ohci_hcd: USB 1.1 'Open' Host Controller (OHCI) Driver


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Yes. If you echo a string that starts with a | character to /proc/sys/kernel/core_pattern, it will get executed and receive the core dump as input. More information is available in man 5 core.


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Just get activation code for SLES 12 and use it for SLES 11 SP4(this method doesn't work to SLES 11 SP3). You will not get an activation code for SP4 in the process of its download - you will see this screen instead of this:


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Here's another puppet solution in the Forge: https://forge.puppetlabs.com/ramseymcgrath/remove_hugepage/ Just use: include remove_hugepage in your puppet node definition.


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Depending on operating system -- via routing socket (BSD family) or netlink socket (Linux). Very brief overview of available kernel interfaces is in GNU Quagga's documentation.


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This is not a direct answer to your question - I think @BasileStarynkevitch is right that in general, this is not something you can easily/reliably do, though in theory at least, if your code is abstract enough (doesn't really on any kernel dependencies) then I suppose you could link it to a stub userspace process and test that way. Having said that the ...


2

You cannot easily do that (calling kernel functions directly from user space). You could make some kernel module -providing some device- which, thru the interface of the device (i.e. read,write,ioctl on that device) is calling your kernel functions. You might patch the kernel (but I don't recommend doing that) to add a new syscall calling your kernel ...


2

ATA errors like this are caused by faulty hardware for sure. You can use "smartctl -a " to check for Reallocated sectors or for errors in the device journal. You can also check the attribute UDMA_CRC_Error_count to check for faulty cable or adapter. If the ata device is part of a RAID, I would check it by itself by removing it from the RAID and using ...


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This is related to your laptop's battery poor performance. This you can be more clear with checking ACPI(Advanced Configuration and Power Interface) modules. When my kernel was updated, I restarted my system and started the new kernel---however it failed to load and the same error messages were sent to the terminal. Then, again I reverted back to my old ...


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GNU parallel is very probably an ordinary application built on standard Linux syscalls. So the particular version of the kernel does not matter much. It should run with an old kernel (e.g. a 3.1) or with a new one (e.g. a 4.1) Parallels desktop is a virtualization package for MacOSX. Since it is using hypervisor technology (hence emulating some PC hardware) ...


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It simply declares a firmware file that may be required by the module. See its definition in module.h; the firmware is loaded by request_firmware(). The information provided via MODULE_FIRMWARE appears in the module information, as shown for example by modinfo.


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The correct package to install all of the required dependencies for building kernel modules is kernel-devel (see the CentOS documentation for more information). The headers are not installed in /usr/src/kernels, rather they're installed in a number of directories below /usr/include (the default location for C header files). You can list the contents of the ...


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While I'm unable to explain why the newest kernel wasn't booting automatically, the kernel booted by GRUB is set in /boot/grub/grub.conf using the default=<menu entry number>, where counting starts at 0. In this specific case, default=1 will boot your desired kernel.


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In SLES11 SP3 with YAST and GRUB bootloader we have to add transparent_hugepage=never in [ YAST-bootloader-edit- line with optional kernel parameter ]. NOTE: This tool changes the file /boot/grub/menu.lst. Only after making this change and rebooting resulted in in disabling THP.


3

The /sys (sysfs) filesystem is somewhat special; many operations are not possible, for example creating or removing a file. Changing the permissions and ownership of a file or setting an ACL is permitted; that allows the system administrator to allow certain users or groups to access certain kernel entry points. There is no special case that restricts a ...


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Assuming that your Kali Linux install uses ext4 (or an older version, which will work even better), you may also be interested in installing ext4 drivers for your windows 7 installation, so you can access your files from within windows. I've used them with reasonable success (I run Windows 7 and Arch Linux). To be safe I would disable writing the your ext4 ...


1

use a live-cd (ubuntu/fedora) and acess your Linux partitions, copy the files/data from there to your windows partitions. First priority is to save the Data. copy to an external disk/usb pendrive, then Later fix the grub issue with grub restore/rescue process.


1

I guess you mean Solaris 11.2 as Solaris 12 is not yet released, possibly next year (2016) according to a roadmap. /usr/bin/kstat is a Perl script in Solaris 11.2 so while still proprietary code, you can certainly read its source code. An alternative, C based open source version of the kstat command is available here ...


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Try commenting out following line in /etc/pam.d/sshd sessionoptional pam_keyinit.so force revoke if you comment it out, new virtual sessions should allow ecryptfs mount to work. This worked for me with screen sessions. See this post.


3

I believe it actually does prioritize interactive-programs -- but perhaps not enough. Programs looses priority the longer they run, and non-interactive programs looses it quicker than interactive ones. You really shouldn't operate at close to 100% CPU-usage, if you do, perhaps you should review some things... There are two things that impact the priority ...


2

Source packages are not added to the rpm database, so they will not show on query. Probable location is ~/rpmbuild/{SOURCES,SPECS} with SOURCES containing the package sources and distribution patches while the SPECS subdirectory containing the .spec file being used to build the package (see rpmbuild (8) man page for details). If you can't find the sources ...


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It should be under /usr/src/kernel. if you dont find it, you can try rpm -qa| grep -w kernel-devel rpm -ql kernel-devel-x.x.x.x.x This will give you the location of files installed by kernel rpm. Bye the way, kernel source should be installed with kernel-devel package, rather kernel-x.x.x.x


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ps -eL|wc -l gives total number of lwp/thread count at any point of time


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ad 1. and 2. The kernel image is called vmlinux, that's right, but that's not what you actually need when you want to build external modules. It's the configuration and header files from this kernel that is needed. ad 3. To build modules, internal or external, you need support for loadable modules in this kernel, you want to build the module for, of course, ...


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The /dev/kmsg represeted by the kmsg_fops structure which has file_operations type that represents standard operations with a file: const struct file_operations kmsg_fops = { .open = devkmsg_open, .read = devkmsg_read, .write_iter = devkmsg_write, .llseek = devkmsg_llseek, .poll = devkmsg_poll, .release = devkmsg_release, }; You ...


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My bad, I did compile kernel and the driver but not actually installed it. The solution is: gentoo~ # cd /usr/src/linux gentoo linux # make modules_install gentoo linux # cp arch/x86/boot/bzImage /boot/kernel-genkernel-x86_64-4.0.5-gentoo gentoo linux # reboot



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