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The iwl3945 driver is for Intel wifi devices. The Netgear WG111v3 doesn't use that driver. The Thinkpad x60s are shipped with Intel Wifi, so maybe it's a boot time hardware conflict, or the drivers need tweaking. The x60s is supposed to have a switch to turn off wifi. Before booting turn off that switch, then try booting. If that fails, (with the ...


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There is some information about this in the gentoo wiki: https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/Custom_Initramfs#Salvaging It recommends the usage of binwalk which works exceedingly well. I'll give a quick walk-through with an example: first extract the bzImage file with binwalk: > binwalk --extract bzImage DECIMAL HEXADECIMAL DESCRIPTION ...


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QEMU emulates synthetic machines which are not strict copies of their real counterparts. If Linux kernel dislikes something about that, it's possible that it will crash early or just hang because it is not aware of sudden changes in expected architecture. You can try to aid the problem with early printk kernel mechanism and trying to redirect console to ...


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Ended up updating to the F24 beta, as it's being frozen anyways. This fixed the problem, and I'm now running on the 4.7 kernel.


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I'd try dnf reinstall kernel or (better) dnf reinstall kernel-4.4.9-300 since it's possible that dnf has status saying that the given set of files is complete.


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How and when will the firmware files arrive to Debian? They'll arrive in the same way as usual, via a firmware-nonfree update; since linux-firmware now includes the Atheros update, the new files should be included. As to when, only the maintainer knows that; you should really file a bug so that he's aware that an update could be useful: reportbug ...


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You might get somewhere browsing the torvalds git tree, eg for the file time/hrtimer.c. Click on blame and for each line number you see the last patch applied. You can also browse the history for older patches.


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I have the same issue on my RHEL 7 machine. But it use GRUB2. When I remove those rd_LVM_LV= in kernel args. Press e before booting, remove those rd_LVM_LV= in kernel args, type CTRL+x I can then boot successfully. Steps to permanently solve on RHEL 7: Open /etc/default/grub remove those rd_LVM_LV= in "GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX" Run grub2-mkconifg to create a ...


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This seems to be a common problem with the latest update to the kernel module. The CentOS package maintainer seems to have left out or munged the step that builds initramfs after the new kernel is installed. You're left with an unbootable system. The steps for fixing this are to boot into the previous kernel version (in rescue mode), re-run dracut for the ...


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You can't (re)compile a kernel module by simply extracting the source and running make in its subdirectory. Each distribution has a preferred method - in your case, see section 8.10. Compiling a Kernel of the Debian handbook. Specific drivers have to be enabled via the kernel's build configuration system. You would need to enable MOUSE_PS2_SENTELIC. ...


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I also faced this problem while inserting module into the kernel. Enter your current kernel version correctly go to cd /lib/modules/your-kernel-version-gereric/ directory and check whether build directory is present or not. If present then you can directly compile your module using below command make -C /lib/modules/$(shell uname -r)/build M=$(PWD)


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If you need to do it non-interactively, you might be able to use make oldconfig or make olddefconfig. make *config will fix the dependencies and those aren't as verbose as, say menuconfig. (Otherwise menuconfig is perfectly fine for enabling features one by one, it even includes the help texts!) make oldconfig will ask for any 'new' configuration options, ...


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Okay, after joe pointed me the right direction in comments, this is how I did it: basicly just install pacman -S linux-lts (optional) check if kernel, ramdisk and fallback are available in ls -lsha /boot remove the standard kernel pacman -R linux update the grub config grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg reboot Note, for syslinux you'll need to edit the ...


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If somebody needs the answer just in case, I found an acceptable(for me) approach. You just let the normal Unix/linux kernel to boot then you just kexec into grub or another bootloader. Maybe this could be scripted as an init script.


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Since kernel 2.6.29 there is a script that you can find in /kernel_extracted_dir/scripts/config For example /kernel_extracted_dir/scripts/config --set-val CONFIG_LOG_BUF_SHIFT 14 /kernel_extracted_dir/scripts/config --enable CONFIG_PRINTK_TIME (To give credit where it is due, I took the example from this blog) You have the follwing options (copied from ...


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Okay, so for me worked upgrading/installing kernel and all kernel-X modules. After that a kernel (propriate version) directory appeared in /usr/src/kernels/


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The example you give is not just an example. This is a major system upgrade. You better wait for 16.04.1 which is probably more stable. Upgrading from 14.04 to 16.04 is not just an upgrade. If you have 14.04, and it installs a new kernel like 3.2.34 to 3.2.35, you can wait I guess. Well maybe there is a security update in the old kernel, then you can see ...


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This question has a big chance of getting closed due to the answers you will get are going to be mostly opinion based. But here is my 2 cents. Production systems are reliant on stable releases of operating systems. If you install the latest and greatest kernel/patch/update on your system, you don't know what deficiencies lurk in the short time ahead. I am ...


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The solution to the problem is, We killed the rsync process which was initiated by vzdump (there were two) Once we kill rsync, the vzdump process was exited after that, resume/stop/start the VM didn't work vzctl chkpnt VEID --resume (this command helped to start the VM)


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for BSDs %logger -p kern.crit MESSAGE (courtesy Ian, freebsd-questions mailing list) for Linux su root -c 'echo MESSAGE > /dev/kmsg'


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The solution! Install elrepo repository. && install kernel independant e1000e drivers from elrepo && tell kernel to use new drivers && reboot. rpm -Uvh http://www.elrepo.org/elrepo-release-5-5.el5.elrepo.noarch.rpm && yum install kmod-e1000e && sudo nano /etc/modprobe.conf && reboot Replace #alias eth0 ...


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Just want to show you a real example of circular Dependency or loop which could cause the system freeze. In your X session and graphical terminal emulator, run this command to get the Xorg.bin pid: [xiaobai@xiaobai tmp]$ pgrep Xorg 1780 [xiaobai@xiaobai tmp]$ Then do: [xiaobai@xiaobai tmp]$ sudo strace -p 1780 It will freeze entire desktop after a few ...


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Two things to keep in mind with RHEL (which is what I'm assuming you mean by "red hat"): 1) It's an Enterprise platform, which means they intentionally try to keep things as similar as possible for as long as possible. The updates you're getting are to fix issues with the older kernel. Occasionally they'll backport new features or rebase a package but the ...


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What you need is to get your pc to boot from your target kernel. Since both kernels are available on your system they should be available at boot time via Grub (At least I think that's how mint deals with it - I'm using archlinux and it is a bit different :) ) So when you reboot you should have the option, select your preferred kernel (3.19) from your ...


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Unfortunately, you cannot compile a kernel for STLinux on STLinux. You are not supposed to, at least. They are embedded devices with limited resources. What you have to do is having or installing a Linux on another (Intel) machine, cross compile the kernel and then copy it over to the destination machine. BTW, cross compilation is the act of building up ...


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I have booted my system with my previous kernel which is working fine. while troubleshooting the system we found that there is no initrmfs image on the system and there is no initramfs line in the grub.conf file. I have created the image with the below command and edited the grub.conf file # mkinitrd /boot/initramfs-2.6.32-573.26.1.el6.x86_64.img ...


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make install simply copies the kernel image to the /boot directory. make modules_install copies the modules to /lib/modules/kernel-version/. Most linux distributions these days boot using grub, so you need to run update-grub to notice the new kernel image in /boot, and add an entry to boot it to the grub configuration file so you get the option to boot ...


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I had to copy the modules from Qubes and regenerate the initramfs using the sudo dracut -f command.


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Isn't /boot mounted readonly, by chance? If so, mount -o rw,remount /boot && yum update kernel && mount -o ro,remount /boot (note: I'm rarely seen at centos hosts being an ALT Linux developer so YMMV)



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