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1

You can't #include two headers with an identical path, but you can install one outside of the normal paths and have it supersede those when you compile by using the appropriate switch (for gcc, -I). I think you understand that stuff already, so it should not take too much thinking to recognize that you if you place more than one asm/fcntl.h in normal ...


1

If you are using Buildroot, select a uImage kernel output file (BR2_LINUX_KERNEL_UIMAGE=y). Compile normally and Buildroot will also create a vmlinux file in an intermediate step. While the vmlinux file is not copied to the /output/images directory it can be found in ./output/build/linux-custom/(or by running find . -name "vmlinux").


0

It's important to give to the toolchain used to build the kernel the location of the kernel source tree. Otherwise, even if the compilation runs perfectly, the installation may fail with errors about missing modules or parts. The kernel source tree is specified through the KERNEL_TREE environment variable. It defaults to /usr/src/linux. So either export ...


1

To change the NDP DAD timing, use sysctl. The sysctl-key to look at is net.ipv6.neigh.<if>.retrans_time_ms.


-2

Try only make && make modules_install


1

This should involve some kind of emulation such as linprocfs that will allow you to run Linux binaries inside FreeBSD. I donĀ“t think that such technology exists, where you will be able to run Linux binaries inside XNU. However, you could give it a try on the PureDarwin software distribution, that is a Darwin compilation and it will allow you to user ...


0

SOLVED. 1-Downloaded the kernel-lt-devel-3.10.40-1.el6.elrepo.x86_64.rpm from http://ftp.nluug.nl/os/Linux/distr/elrepo/archive/kernel/el6/x86_64/RPMS/ 2-Installed (just executing the file) 3-Pointed de VMware configuration to /usr/src/kernels/2.6.32-431.20.3.el6.x86_64/include/linux/ When the VMware start, another error appeared. Said that ...


1

kernel.org has some excellent documentation on Applying Patches to the Linux Kernel. Essentially, you use the patch command. Once you have acquired the patch (here called patchfile), place it in your build directory and then issue the command: patch -p <num> < patchfile where <num> is the number of leading slashes to remove from the ...


1

So I figured out what the problem was: Red Hat's mkbldevs in the init script of the initrd.img was failing to make the block devices. Without any block devices LVM was not able to mount drives. I installed BusyBox and made a custom initrd and while in the shell I noticed that mkblkdevs called by the /bin/nash script didn't make /dev/sd*. I suppose you ...


2

The module names may contain both - and _ . Both symbols can be interchanged while using with modprobe or lsmod and also in the conf files in /etc/modprobe.d/ . So that means you can use any of usb_storage or usb-storage for blacklisting.


3

From the tcpdump's manual: packets ``dropped by kernel'' (this is the number of packets that were dropped, due to a lack of buffer space, by the packet capture mechanism in the OS on which tcpdump is running, if the OS reports that information to applications; if not, it will be reported as 0). A bit of explanation: The tcpdump captures raw packets ...


1

According to man tcpdump: packets dropped by kernel (this is the number of packets that were dropped, due to a lack of buffer space, by the packet capture mechanism in the OS on which tcpdump is running, if the OS reports that information to applications; if not, it will be reported as 0). The kernel puts captured packets in a fixed-size capture ...


3

The GNU C library has a reference manual that includes documentation for all or most of the data structures in the standard library and extensions. This has a type index. Beware there's also a "GNU C Reference Manual", but it and the "GNU C Library Reference Manual" are two different things. You can also autogenerate documention sufficient for browsing ...


0

There are two things here: If zypper in ncurses-devel fails, something is wrong with your system - do you have any repositories enabled at all? What SUSE based distribution are you using? To compile the kernel you don't need ncurses at all (it would be a pretty silly requirement for such a low-lewel piece of software). You need ncurses (and its devel ...


0

Why does *BSD uses driver specific names for network interfaces? To make things simple. If you look to an interface named bge0 and take a look at the manuals or use your mnemonic link system you will quickly remember that this driver is a Broadcom Gigabit Etherhet. This document is also usefull. Does it mean there is no abstraction layer describing ...


0

I had the same problam and I managed to build mini Linux following the steps below. Steps in Building Base Mini Linux Distro Compile the kernel and see the result in terms of size of the compilation Create rootfs image (format as ext2 mke2fs for example) that will contain the root system and some basic programs (used busybox) Mount rootfs and create ...


0

The underlying files and directories are in memory so un-mounting the partition is technically safe (I guess). On the contrary, if a file from a filesystem is open, then unmounting the partition is impossible. A file that is open by a process is not actually loaded into memory when the process opens the file (this would be inefficient, and would even ...


2

You can do a "lazy unmount". A lazy unmount makes the filesystem unavailable to any new processes that are launched, but any processes which are currently using it will be able to continue using it. Then once those processes which are currently using it are finished, the filesystem will unmount. To do this, it's simply: umount -l /mount/point


0

You can attempt a force unmount. I would be cautious when using this as it may not be good while files are in use in the particular partition. The -f option tells Linux to force an unmount operation that might otherwise fail. The command to do this is: umount -f <partition name>


0

in /var/log/messages and /var/log/syslog, it's automatically converted to HRTS (human readable timestamp). With -T, dmesg can return you with the HRTS form of the kernel ring. Please look at man dmesg. You may make a cron script to get what you exactly want : every $PERIOD seconds, dmesg --ctime --read-clear >> mymessagesHRTS.log You may think in ...


0

Most people install updates to fix bugs, apply security updates and to get new features. As you remarked: unless you use technology like Ksplice the Linux system needs to be rebooted for an update to kernel to take effect, simply installing a new kernel is not enough. So if you do not reboot you might as well not have installed the kernel update for all ...


3

It won't affect the kernel itself (besides not taking advantage of the update). However, some newly installed programs might rely on newer kernel features. Also, if you run a program that relies on loading a kernel module then you may find that that module is no longer installed, and newly installed modules won't load in the old kernel. Basically, if ...


3

No, not really. The new kernels simply won't be used.


1

The solution is to remove vzkernel-firmware package: rpm -e vzkernel-firmware and exclude it by adding the line marked in bold to openvz yum repo file /etc/yum.repos.d/openvz.repo: [openvz-kernel-rhel6] name=OpenVZ RHEL6-based kernel #baseurl=http://download.openvz.org/kernel/branches/rhel6-2.6.32/current/ ...


6

You could just use apt to get the source, check that the file /etc/apt/sources.list contains a line starting with deb-src and then use the command: apt-get update #if you want to download the source into the current directory use: apt-get source linux-image-$(uname -r) #if you want the source to be installed in the system directory use: apt-get ...



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