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7

My question is, which file in /proc gets read by the kernel during the boot up process? This was a question on my LPIC 101 test... Sounds like a trick question. The files in /proc aren't real files on disk (this is why they have a size of 0) and the nodes don't exist until the kernel mounts a procfs file system there and populates it. Procfs and sysfs ...


4

In the linux kernel source code in sysrq.c at line 415, there is a struct defined, what should happen when a certain key is pressed. So you see, no command in a terminal is excuted, instead of this, hard coded functions in the kernel are called. So, as long as the kernel is not crashed, you can press those keys, doesn't matter which application is running in ...


2

Only the vendors themselves know the real answer but here are some guesses. I would assume that it's simply because it would make the device more expensive. By requiring the OS to inject firmware at run time they get to avoid the need for non-volatile memory like ROM or Flash on the device. Secondarily, I would assume the vendors might also feel that the ...


2

It's almost never important. If you're truly worried about the build system, you should consider the compiler, library and header versions before considering the kernel. It is up to the code itself as to whether it 'remembers' the kernel version. Some packages store a string representing the compiler version, as this is far more important. In fact the ...


2

as linked in the wikipedia article in external links ... you can see that documentation here: Linux Magic System Request Key Hacks edit: this is also found in Linux kernel source under the Documentation subdirectory


2

The route or the ip utility get their information from a pseudo filesystem called procfs. It is normally mounted under /proc. There is a file called /proc/net/route, where you can see the kernel's IP routing table. You can print the routing table with cat instead, but the route utility formats the output human readable, because the IP adresses are stored in ...


2

The kernel documentation describes bdl_pos_adj as follows (see ALSA-Configuration.txt and HD-Audio.txt): bdl_pos_adj - Specifies the DMA IRQ timing delay in samples. Passing -1 will make the driver to choose the appropriate value based on the controller chip. (sic). On Intel controllers, the default is 1 (which is ...


1

I will not add anything about importance or not of knowing that kernel version since the comments and the answer above is fully explained. But as an answer for your comment in the answer above What about graphics drivers (kernel build vs run environment) ? What you must care is the gcc version that the kernel was compiled with so that you have to use ...


1

First install XZ yum -y install xz then tar -xvf yourfile.tar.xz


1

Should work with the following command: tar -xvfz linux-2.6.32.65.tar.xz


1

Kernel 4.0.2 is available in Debian unstable. It can be installed on Jessie. If it doesn't work on your laptop, please report a bug (reportbug linux-4.0.0-1-686-pae if you're using the 32-bit version, or reportbug linux-4.0.0-1-amd64 if you're using the 64-bit version).


1

You can download the relevant packages (which depend on your exact requirements) from Debian snapshots.


1

You could upgrade the kernel via elrepo. rpm -Uvh http://www.elrepo.org/elrepo-release-7.0-2.el7.elrepo.noarch.rpm (external link) yum install --enablerepo=elrepo-kernel kernel-ml You can also install the updated firmware and headers yum install --enablerepo=elrepo-kernel kernel-ml-{firmware,headers,devel} You'll probably need to remove the ...


1

Let's start with the IO scheduler first. There's a IO scheduler per block device. Its job is to schedule (order) the requests that pile up in the device queue. There are three different algorithms currently shipped in the linux kernel: deadline, noop and cfq. cfq is the default, and according to its doc: The CFQ I/O scheduler tries to distribute ...



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