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3

A disk should grant that a sector is written atomically. The sector size was 512 bytes and today is typically 4096 bytes for larger disks. In order to get no problem from partially written "blocks", it is important to write everything in a special order. Note that the only reason why there could be a partially written part in the filesystem is a power ...


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for BSDs %logger -p kern.crit MESSAGE (courtesy Ian, freebsd-questions mailing list) for Linux su root -c 'echo MESSAGE > /dev/kmsg'


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Unfortunately, you cannot compile a kernel for STLinux on STLinux. You are not supposed to, at least. They are embedded devices with limited resources. What you have to do is having or installing a Linux on another (Intel) machine, cross compile the kernel and then copy it over to the destination machine. BTW, cross compilation is the act of building up ...


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Okay, after joe pointed me the right direction in comments, this is how I did it: basicly just install pacman -S linux-lts (optional) check if kernel, ramdisk and fallback are available in ls -lsha /boot remove the standard kernel pacman -R linux update the grub config grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg reboot Note, for syslinux you'll need to edit the ...


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If somebody needs the answer just in case, I found an acceptable(for me) approach. You just let the normal Unix/linux kernel to boot then you just kexec into grub or another bootloader. Maybe this could be scripted as an init script.


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This seems to be a common problem with the latest update to the kernel module. The CentOS package maintainer seems to have left out or munged the step that builds initramfs after the new kernel is installed. You're left with an unbootable system. The steps for fixing this are to boot into the previous kernel version (in rescue mode), re-run dracut for the ...


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You can't (re)compile a kernel module by simply extracting the source and running make in its subdirectory. Each distribution has a preferred method - in your case, see section 8.10. Compiling a Kernel of the Debian handbook. Specific drivers have to be enabled via the kernel's build configuration system. You would need to enable MOUSE_PS2_SENTELIC. ...


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The example you give is not just an example. This is a major system upgrade. You better wait for 16.04.1 which is probably more stable. Upgrading from 14.04 to 16.04 is not just an upgrade. If you have 14.04, and it installs a new kernel like 3.2.34 to 3.2.35, you can wait I guess. Well maybe there is a security update in the old kernel, then you can see ...


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make install simply copies the kernel image to the /boot directory. make modules_install copies the modules to /lib/modules/kernel-version/. Most linux distributions these days boot using grub, so you need to run update-grub to notice the new kernel image in /boot, and add an entry to boot it to the grub configuration file so you get the option to boot ...


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I had to copy the modules from Qubes and regenerate the initramfs using the sudo dracut -f command.


1

The linux kernel source in Ubuntu is open source, so there is no problem with using (parts of) it, just like you can use any other linux kernel source. Using the Ubuntu name for your OS is not allowed unless you have permission from Canonical (who own the Ubuntu trademark), which in general is true for any other trademarks and their owners too. Of course ...


1

That depends on the underlying storage technology. Some storage allows a certain block size to be stored atomically, typically a power of 2 which is at least 256 and usually in the 1kB—4kB range. If that's the case, then the filesystem layer can replace blocks in place, provided that the replacement of the block yields a valid system state. This is fine ...


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Just want to show you a real example of circular Dependency or loop which could cause the system freeze. In your X session and graphical terminal emulator, run this command to get the Xorg.bin pid: [xiaobai@xiaobai tmp]$ pgrep Xorg 1780 [xiaobai@xiaobai tmp]$ Then do: [xiaobai@xiaobai tmp]$ sudo strace -p 1780 It will freeze entire desktop after a few ...


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Adding more detail to the answers above. As we're using VM's more and more, a linux host may be a vm on one of these cloud environments. In both examples 1 & 2 we've got a good idea of the applications running and so how much RAM they consume. In 3, not so much Example 1 A high performance private cloud (think the sort most banks would pay millions ...


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I'm looking at this one: Slurm is an open-source workload manager designed for Linux clusters of all sizes. It provides three key functions. First it allocates exclusive and/or non-exclusive access to resources (computer nodes) to users for some duration of time so they can perform work. Second, it provides a framework for starting, executing, and ...



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