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3

You're missing a link to the page in question, but even without that link I can tell you that the page is simply telling you to run modprobe v4l2loopback. The modprobe command is a way of inserting a new kernel module into the running kernel without having to rebuild the entire kernel and/or reboot the machine. Chances are you won't be able to successfully ...


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according to info from Peter Rajnoha about an old 2014 fedora bug 1152185, "The warning is there because if lvmetad is already instantiated and running, then using use_lvmetad=0 will cause LVM commands run under this setting to not notify lvmetad about any changes - therefore lvmetad may miss some information - hence the warning.". https://bugzilla.redhat....


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The Unix kernel has traditionally included some assembly language code.  I haven’t looked at its source code recently, but I suspect that that’s still true. See How does a driver actually communicate with a hardware device? for an overview of that topic.  The answers to that question discuss two kinds of computer architecture.  On a system that uses port-...


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PIDs do wrap around in normal usage. That's not a problem at all; the kernel ensures that new PIDs don't collide with existing PIDs. Nothing says that PIDs have to be monotomically increasing; process 12345 could easily fork() and have a child process of 5001. In this scenario, yes, a user could potentially use up all process slots and prevent further ...


2

I'm sure someone is still doing this, but back in the days before stuff like ILO/DRAC/etc. became cheap and ubiquitios the best way to get "out of band" access to the console in case of emergencies or an oops was over the serial port. You would mount a Terminal Server in the rack, then run cables to the serial port of your servers. Some BIOSs supported ...


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What the system will do with the remaining 20%? The kernel will use the remaining physical memory for its own purposes (internal structures, tables, buffers, caches, whatever). The memory overcommitment setting handle userland application virtual memory reservations, the kernel doesn't use virtual memory but physical one. Why is this parameter required ...


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I observed the exact same messages with the exact same ridiculously high values of lost interrupts being logged all the time. For me it was caused by kernel parameter "irqpoll" in combination with "pci=routeirq" on my system while using PCI soundcard on a MB with buggy PCIe-to-PCI bridge. I run kernel 4.6.2 from Debian testing on MB Asus P8Z68-V PRO GEN3, ...


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You need to set up a kernel virtual address mapping for the location e.g. mem_addr = ioremap_nocache(BASEADDR + OFFSET, SIZE); (you appear to have asked the same question twice - see enter link description here).


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Try Section 4.5 of the Debian Kernel Handbook: "Building a custom kernel from Debian kernel source". To quote from that section The easiest way to build a custom kernel (the kernel with the configuration different from the one used in the official packages) from the Debian kernel source is to use the linux-source package and the make deb-pkg target. ...


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I've justed tested this on a Raspberry Pi I had lying around, and it worked perfectly. Perhaps you missed a step with the instructions, or were using an older kernel version to begin with. Here are the steps I took which worked. You didn't mention which OS you were running on the Pi, but I'm using a fresh install of the latest version of raspbian (2016-05-...


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The job of the kernel is to run one process: init, which gets process ID 1. It's init's job to run other processes to provide system services and allow users to log in. There are a few other cases where the Linux kernel will execute a process. For example, when the kernel detects new hardware on certain buses, it executes modprobe to load a driver as a ...


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If you actually want it after the user logs in you can put it in your shell profile file. Most likely ~/.bash_profile. You want to add a line, probably near the end, that simply calls the filename of your application as if you were running it from your terminal, for example: /home/username/bin/mypersonalscript.sh&. You may need to use the absolute ...


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you can try an old version of slackware... this mirror has pretty old versions: ftp://slackware.cs.utah.edu/slackware/


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The Linux kernel strives to have stable interfaces for everything that applications use. This includes not only system calls but also files under /proc and under select parts of /sys (some parts of /sys are officially unstable and do change, refer to the documentation for details). /proc/net/dev is documented so it's a stable interface. You can count on it ...


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Total_vm was badly calculated by me and the OOM report is correct. app has allocated 59739 pages which is 233MB. So, this is the correct reason of OOM.



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