Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

As a follow-up of my comment: Run the following command on one shell. You can make a shell script of it or demonize with the -d option. inotifywait -m -r -e open --format '%f' /kernel_sources/directory/in_use/ -o /home/user/kernel_build.log On other shell, execute make The log file /home/user/kernel_build.log will have a list of the files that have been ...


3

I would rather clone this git. And then do git diff --stat $ git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git` $ cd linux-stable/ $ git diff --stat v3.18.6 v3.18.7


3

In Debian terminology, when you run apt-get source linux-image-3.19.0-trunk-amd64 (or the equivalent apt-get source linux), you're actually downloading and extracting the source package. This contains the upstream code (the kernel source code downloaded from kernel.org) and all the Debian packaging, including patches added to the kernel by the Debian ...


2

On Linux, you can find out which driver a network interface is using with this command: ls -l /sys/class/net/<interface name>/device/driver You can rmmod that unless it is statically linked into the running kernel (not likely for a distribution kernel and a wireless driver). Watch out for any other interfaces using the same driver which will be ...


1

It's in kernel space. This article from Linux Device Drivers is a bit dated but still should generally apply: https://lwn.net/images/pdf/LDD3/ch18.pdf However, there is some effort recently towards replacing the kernel driver with a userspace console called "KMSCON" -- see that project's site for more: http://cgit.freedesktop.org/~dvdhrm/kmscon/tree/README


1

The Linux-based system I tried doesn't have a section 9 in its man page, but, looking online, one can find the NetBSD intro(9) man page: This section contains information related to the internal operation of the system kernel. It describes function interfaces and variables of use to the systems and device driver programmer. This appears to be about APIs ...


1

I tried as G-man suggested in the comments.The main Makefile will include the 'Makefile.inc1' and pass some parameters to it e.g: TARGET_ARCH=i386, that's where buildkernel is defined.


1

have a look at ELKS (embeddable linux kernel subset) or verison 1 of Minix


1

As indicated on the website the actual code is available via GitHub for you to look at. https://www.pfsense.org/get-involved/ https://github.com/pfsense/ The other choice is to examine the relevant web server configuration file to find the location the web front-end files so that you can track down other relevant files to modify for your project (I've ...


1

Not really an answer, but too long for a comment. Linux's memory management has been carefully tuned over its long lifetime by some very smart people and it normally does a pretty good job of making the right decision when choosing what to keep in memory and what to drop. Unfortunately, it looks like your workload isn't very compatible with its decisions ...


1

One more thing to consider/try is that tcpdump may be spending a lot of time doing DNS queries to resolve IPs to domain names. If you don't need those, try throwing in the -n (no lookups) flag. e.g.: tcpdump -n port 80


1

According to documentation: http://tldp.org/LDP/lame/LAME/linux-admin-made-easy/kernel-custom.html When you do: make bzImage and then: cp bzImage vmlinuz to create the vmlinuz file. Ie, they are the same file :-).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible