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20

The 1 GiB limit for Linux kernel memory in a 32-bit system is a consequence of 32-bit addressing, and it's a pretty stiff limit. It's not impossible to change, but it's there for a very good reason; changing it has consequences. Let's take the wayback machine to the early 1990s, when Linux was being created. Back in those days, we'd have arguments about ...


11

In the beginning, if you had something to contribute (a patch or a bug report), you mailed it to Linus. This evolved into mailing it to the list (which was linux-kernel@vger.rutgers.edu before kernel.org was created). There was no version control. From time to time, Linus put a tarball on the FTP server. This was the equivalent of a "tag". The available ...


6

The processes used news groups (USENET), and (predominantly) email. A bug "existed" as a thread, putting "[BUG REPORT]" or "LINUX BUG REPORT" in the subject was a common convention. There were no bug IDs. Given the typical user-base, a bug report often came with a patch. There was one long-forgotten software tool used: ibug (see below), other than that ...


3

See Controlling a USB power supply (on/off) with linux, short version, for newer kernels "suspend" does not work anymore: echo "0" > "/sys/bus/usb/devices/usbX/power/autosuspend_delay_ms" echo "auto" > "/sys/bus/usb/devices/usbX/power/control" But it doesn't literally cut the power, it signals the device to poweroff, it's up to the device to ...


3

I just wanted to add to this question as I was trying to disable transparent hugepages on CentOS v6 in order to enable TokuDB for MariaDB. I added the script mentioned by @slm to /etc/rc.local and it disabled transparent hugepages. However, because of the way startup scripts work in Linux, /etc/rc.local is executed after all the services are started. ...


2

Normally, the NIC will only interrupt the CPU if it needs to send the received packet to the system. In non-promiscuous mode, this would only be for packets addressed to its MAC address, the broadcast address ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, or a multicast address to which it has been subscribed. It also does validation before sending the packet to the CPU: the normal ...


2

I want to add a little to Warren Young's excellent answer, because things are actually worse than he writes. The 1GB kernel address space is further divided into two parts. 128MB are for vmalloc and 896MB for lowmem. Never mind what it actually means. When allocating memory, kernel code must choose which of these it wants. You can't just get memory from ...


2

this is upstream. I've somehow found this topic through an unrelated search :) The page where Braiam found the "It's intended to be used with kernel 2.4 & 2.6" information, http://lpg.ticalc.org/prj_usb/linux_download.html , correctly states "Note: driver is now longer maintained. Use built-in libusb support in ticables library." All Linux drivers ...


1

you can start by reading the walktrougth of gentoo linux about configuring the kernel, there are some usefull tips on how to start. from there you will have to google all your hardware chipsets (some of them you can find using lspci and lsusb and use cat /proc/cpuinfo for more information about your cpu. Read the descriptions of the kernel-modules ...


1

Those drivers aren't intended for newer kernels: It's intented to be used with kernel 2.4 & 2.6. It's searching for a header that do not exist anymore in the kernel. You must contact developers so they can provide a patch.


1

The symptoms are very consistent with a mostly saturated IO system, however having for the most part ruled out IO load from the OS/userspace side, another possibility is the drive running self-tests on itself, which may include reading from all the sectors. This should be queryable/tunable from smartctl (At least one place being smartctl -c for querying). ...



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