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4

linux-image-amd64 is a generic metapackage, which depends on the specific default kernel package. In your particular case, linux-image-amd64 probably depends on linux-image-3.16-2-amd64. In general is suffices to install the generic metapackage. You could alternatively install the specific linux-image-3.16-2-amd64 package, but in general it is better style ...


4

The value can only be extended up to a theoretical maximum of 32768 for 32 bit systems or 4194304 for 64 bit.


3

/lib/modules/$(uname -r)/source should be a symbolic link to the kernel source tree (if it was installed in a reasonable way). Other than that find / -type d -name "linux-3.14.0" will look for the distribution directory of the 3.14.0 Linux kernel - that is the one you get when you unpack the tarball. If that fails, find / -type d -name "linux-*" find / ...


2

One option to do a quick test could be to use a KGDB enabled kernel and stop the kernel manually and test, see this link. On another note, things I remember that could cause your pauses: cpufreq, cat /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/cpuinfo_transition_latency, the value is in ns (4000 in my AMD FX(tm)-8120 Eight-Core Processor) shouldn't be a problem, ...


2

Here is a scheme I made some time ago about how sshd works. It doesn't concern the operation of line discipline and stuff, but it adds a real-life illustration of who interacts with what:


2

Linux is NOT Windows and thus "patches" are actually totally re-compiled/re-loaded from the base code after source code modifications and distributed as a package. Thus it is a bit difficult to know if some specific change has been incorporated into a binary without downloading the source and checking for the specific source code change. Versions do not ...


1

From here, I see that /etc/kernel/postinst.d is the place where scripts are placed when they need to be executed during the kernel installation time. This requires that DKMS is available on your system (many distributions, including RHEL, support it). Since you had mentioned automating the re-installation of VMWare tools, I see that you could automate it as ...


1

The PAE kernel means that you can use up to 64 GB of RAM even if you have a 32 Bit Linux. Furthermore, the kernel 3.2 is the lowest you can have in Ubuntu 12.04 except if you compile a lower one by yourself. This can be harmful since a lot of kernel modules and other packages relies on it.


1

Most programs and scripts I've seen parse the usual files in /etc, AFAIK there's no other way: On Redhat, look for /etc/redhat-release On Debian, look for /etc/debian_version Mandriva has /etc/version and Slackware has /etc/slackware-version You could also use uname to get the ARCH or, probably the most sane way, use lsb_release.


1

P states on x86 processors are levels of voltage scaling. When a processor runs at higher voltage, it can run faster, but it also uses more energy and heats more. The P state numbering is standardized: 0 to 15, from fastest to slowest. It is up to the kernel to decide when to switch between P states. The kernel will switch to a lower-numbered (faster, ...


1

Over the last 10 years I've been running multiple Gentoo systems with 1000+ packages using -O3 -march=native globally and have yet to run into any of these mythical stability issues that -O3 is supposed to have. Benchmarks of CPU intensive applications (like math/science apps) consistently show -O3 to produce faster code, after all it would be pointless if ...


1

From the manpage: kernel-wedge is used to generate kernel module udebs for the debian installer. What it does is take a regular kernel image deb and then split it out into udebs. udebs are packages used by the Debian installer and are like regular deb packages except that things that are not needed for bootstrapping an installation, but would be ...


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staging-next is, as of right now, currently broken, specifically f823182bc289 of staging-next is broken. If you really want to use staging-next, check out fcf1b73d08cd, which is near the top and does compile.


1

As mentioned in the comments, you should be using the Iproute2 utility ip, and not ifconfig. ifconfig has been deprecated in Linux for several years now, and is missing a lot of functionality. The specific bit of functionality affecting your case is the ability to add multiple IP addresses to a single interface (without creating interface aliases). The ...



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