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6

You could just use apt to get the source, check that the file /etc/apt/sources.list contains a line starting with deb-src and then use the command: apt-get update #if you want to download the source into the current directory use: apt-get source linux-image-$(uname -r) #if you want the source to be installed in the system directory use: apt-get ...


3

From the tcpdump's manual: packets ``dropped by kernel'' (this is the number of packets that were dropped, due to a lack of buffer space, by the packet capture mechanism in the OS on which tcpdump is running, if the OS reports that information to applications; if not, it will be reported as 0). A bit of explanation: The tcpdump captures raw packets ...


3

The GNU C library has a reference manual that includes documentation for all or most of the data structures in the standard library and extensions. This has a type index. Beware there's also a "GNU C Reference Manual", but it and the "GNU C Library Reference Manual" are two different things. You can also autogenerate documention sufficient for browsing ...


3

It won't affect the kernel itself (besides not taking advantage of the update). However, some newly installed programs might rely on newer kernel features. Also, if you run a program that relies on loading a kernel module then you may find that that module is no longer installed, and newly installed modules won't load in the old kernel. Basically, if ...


3

No, not really. The new kernels simply won't be used.


2

I would guess that this has much to do with the way bootloader and kernel are glued. Section 5.1.3 (Bootstrap Loader) in Hallinan's Embedded Linux Primer has the following to say on this : Some bootstrap loaders perform checksum veriļ¬cation of the kernel image, and most decompress and relocate the kernel image. The difference between a bootloader and a ...


2

You can do a "lazy unmount". A lazy unmount makes the filesystem unavailable to any new processes that are launched, but any processes which are currently using it will be able to continue using it. Then once those processes which are currently using it are finished, the filesystem will unmount. To do this, it's simply: umount -l /mount/point


2

The module names may contain both - and _ . Both symbols can be interchanged while using with modprobe or lsmod and also in the conf files in /etc/modprobe.d/ . So that means you can use any of usb_storage or usb-storage for blacklisting.


1

kernel.org has some excellent documentation on Applying Patches to the Linux Kernel. Essentially, you use the patch command. Once you have acquired the patch (here called patchfile), place it in your build directory and then issue the command: patch -p <num> < patchfile where <num> is the number of leading slashes to remove from the ...


1

According to man tcpdump: packets dropped by kernel (this is the number of packets that were dropped, due to a lack of buffer space, by the packet capture mechanism in the OS on which tcpdump is running, if the OS reports that information to applications; if not, it will be reported as 0). The kernel puts captured packets in a fixed-size capture ...


1

So I figured out what the problem was: Red Hat's mkbldevs in the init script of the initrd.img was failing to make the block devices. Without any block devices LVM was not able to mount drives. I installed BusyBox and made a custom initrd and while in the shell I noticed that mkblkdevs called by the /bin/nash script didn't make /dev/sd*. I suppose you ...


1

The solution is to remove vzkernel-firmware package: rpm -e vzkernel-firmware and exclude it by adding the line marked in bold to openvz yum repo file /etc/yum.repos.d/openvz.repo: [openvz-kernel-rhel6] name=OpenVZ RHEL6-based kernel #baseurl=http://download.openvz.org/kernel/branches/rhel6-2.6.32/current/ ...



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