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AFAIK, this looks good. The default one I use is a little different. It comes from the Linux Device Drivers book # To build modules outside of the kernel tree, we run "make" # in the kernel source tree; the Makefile these then includes this # Makefile once again. # This conditional selects whether we are being included from the # kernel Makefile or not. ...


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If you have a driver or module enabled that needs any of these routines they'll be automatically force-enabled for you. If you can disable any of these options it means nothing in your kernel requires them, which is why they're not getting loaded. Not all drivers come from the kernel though. There are external packages that also install kernel modules ...


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When SMP support was first added to Linux, it used a "giant lock" or "BKL" (big kernel lock), this was still present right up until a few years ago. This effectively made the kernel single threaded (except I believe for hardware interrupt servicing), so no more than one syscall could be active, which of course limited performance for many types of workload. ...


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As suggested by Mali, we need to enable the kernel support for SPI and I2C transmission protocol. I did it compiling the kernel separately but we can do it from the Buildroot folder runnning make linux-menuconfig During the kernel 3.8.13 configuration, add: linux-3.8.13$ make menuconfig Go to Device Drivers menu and check the I2C support pressing ...


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Most or all of the information from modinfo is either just trivia (author, license) or does not apply to built-in modules (magic, depends, filename, etc.). The only one that has any conceivable practical value is "parm", but again, it cannot apply in the same way to a built-in because you don't load them. The vast majority of modules don't have this ...


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Did you try following https://openvz.org/VPN_via_the_TUN/TAP_device ? Meanwhile I'd close this question, cause it clearly shows lack of efforts to resolve the problem before asking question.


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From what I understand, Target Package -> Hardware handling -> i2c-tools refers to user space i2c utilities. What you miss is kernel space i2c modules, you need to add them in make linux-menuconfig.


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Normally modprobe loads modules from sub folders located in /lib/modules/$(uname -r). However all modules should be also listed in the file /lib/modules/$(uname -r)/modules.dep. If some module is present on the system, but is not on the list then run command depmod which will include your module to modules.dep.


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Try the following command in your terminal sudo apt-get install linux-generic


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A few things to try: modprobe.d/*.conf files are (mainly) for blacklists and if you just add a module name like fglrx then the rest of that config file gets ignored (which is your issue). So remove fglrx from the modprobe.d/radeon.conf file and add it to /etc/modules (point #2): If you want to explicitly load modules /etc/modules should suffice. Rename the ...


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The blacklist command will blacklist a module so that it will not be loaded automatically, but the module may be loaded if another non-blacklisted module depends on it or if it is loaded manually. However, there is a workaround for this behaviour; the install command instructs modprobe to run a custom command instead of inserting the module in the kernel as ...



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