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I don't agree with the squashfs recommendations. You don't usually write a squashfs to a raw block device; think of it as an easily-readable tar archive. That means you would still need an underlaying filesystem. ext2 has several severe limitations that limit its usefulness today; I would therefore recommend ext4. Since this is meant for archiving, you ...


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SquashFS is a compressible read-only filesystem that fits your requirements well, has been in the kernel for a few years, and is already widely used (e.g., in LiveCDs). The latest documentation for the userspace tools is on GitHub. From the documentation: Squashfs is a highly compressed read-only filesystem for Linux. It uses either gzip/xz/lzo/lz4 ...


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You'd probably be better served by a compressed filesystem. There are ways of compressing various Linux filesystems (FUSE can do it), but since this will be read-only once you've created it, you might consider squashfs. You create the filesystem with mksquashfs. Linux has had squashfs in the main kernel since 2.6.something, so it should work from pretty ...



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