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0

Do PATH=$PATH:/usr/jdk/instances/jdk1.7.0_67/bin export PATH and give it another shot.


-1

If it still doesn't work, double check if you use su - oracle because Using su - oracle will break X screen forwarding or proper display when using Oracle runInstaller. So you need ssh the host with user oracle.


3

With zsh: zsh -xl In bash: PS4='+$BASH_SOURCE> ' BASH_XTRACEFD=7 bash -xl 7>&2 That will simulate a login shell and show everything that is done (except in areas where stderr is redirected with zsh) along with the name of the file currently being interpreted. So all you need to do is look for JAVA_HOME in that output. (you can use the script ...


6

You didn't specify a shell. So, I will assume bash. The next issue is: did you set it for your user only or system-wide? If you set it as your user, then run: grep JAVA_HOME ~/.bash_profile, ~/.bash_login ~/.profile ~/.bashrc If you set it system-wide, then it may vary with distribution but try: grep JAVA_HOME /etc/profile /etc/bash.bashrc ...


0

You can send key events with java.awt.Robot: (Note that this is not about sending a tab character*.) Something like this will send a Tab event - to show the minimal use of java.awt.Robot: public class SendTabKey { public static void main(String[] args) { new SendTabKey(); } public SendTabKey() { try { Robot robot = new Robot(); ...


2

In our case it helped to constrain the heap size that the VM tries to reserve on startup. For example on the command line: export _JAVA_OPTIONS='-Xms64M -Xmx128m' or for Tomcat in [TOMCAT_HOME]/bin/setenv.sh #!/bin/sh JAVA_OPTS="-Xms64M -Xmx256M" (Note the extra leading underscore on the command line.) The explanation of our provider is: ...


2

I feel lucky in stumbling across this solution, but wanted to post it up in case anyone else runs across this issue in installing legacy software. Assuming the install anywhere script is called Install.bin # cp Install.bin Install.bak # cat Install.bak | sed "s/export LD_ASSUME_KERNEL/#xport LD_ASSUME_KERNEL/" > Install.bin # rm Install.bak This ...


1

You know how to set the variable in a shell, but for the record you can write: export _JAVA_OPTIONS='-Dawt.useSystemAAFontSettings=on' and all programs you start from this shell session after that will have the variable set. If you want it to be set for every shell you start afterwards, add that line to ~/.profile as well. In that case it will apply to ...


1

Your swap area is highly undersized. A large part of the RAM reported to be free is in fact currently unusable because it serves as a backing store to other programs memory reservations. Just add some swap, it can be a simple file, and you'll be able to launch your JVM.


1

You can have available RAM but still run out of swap. I believe this could be what you are experiencing. Investigate with swap -s. As a second idea the problem may be due to the fact that there isn't enough contiguous memory available although it would seem fairly odd if the OS cannot find 10 GB contiguous free memory when there seems to >100 GB free.


0

Try with the following instead: java -Xms512m -Xmx512m -d64 HelloWorldApp or java -Xms1024m -Xmx1024m -d64 HelloWorldApp May also be because it is too high.


2

Take a backup first. Run: # cd <directory where new RPM is located> # yum install java-1.6.0-openjdk-1.6.0.0-5.1.13.3.el6_5.rpm If things don't go well and the previous version's RPM is available to the system, you can roll back with: # yum history undo last If it's not on the system, you can downgrade by re-installing the previous version ...



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