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1

The link you give says: All configuration files are embedded in jars. We ship in the conf folder template configuration files. You can override the default configuration : Copy the conf folder any ...-template... you need and update according to your needs. The last part isn't particularly clear, but as I understand it, it means you can ...


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A lot of software has been written already to solve this kind of problem; f.e. Monit and supervisord. Don't reinvent the wheel.


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Based on your clarification, one answer is "shell scripting". Even to me, that sounds like a snarky answer, but it really isn't meant to be, I just don't know a better way to phrase it. You would end up with a script that looked something like this: #!/bin/bash java -jar <jarfile> -option1 -option2 --extended-option-1 You could also add $* to the ...


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In the Environment Variables settings in eclipse create a System Variable called _JAVA_OPTIONS with the value -Xms256m -Xmx1024m or change the existing one to these values. This assumes you have sufficient memory available.


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Check that the JVM version (32/64 bit) you use matches the eclipse version (32/64 bit). I find these lines conflicting. Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 23.25-b01, mixed mode) arch x86


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Couldn't make it work in any other way: java-package made .deb with plugins scripts fixed to 8u71 java couldn't make the Iceweasel recognize the correct version, only the command line interface. Luckily Webupd8 released the updated version a few days ago, now everything is running smoothly.


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To install the default Web Browser Plugin on your system, run: apt-get install icedtea-plugin


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You can't download the complete source code for Java 1.4.2, Sun never published it (as far as I'm aware). On the Oracle page you link to, scroll down to version 1.4.2_19 and you'll find installation packages for 32-bit Intel CPUs, which you may be able to use on your Amazon server (if you can install the necessary 32-bit supporting libraries).


2

Bash (and in fact all shells) will execute the first executable file found of the name given searching in the order defined by the $PATH in the environment. Or simply: The first executable found in the $PATH order.


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Your $PATH is searched sequentially. For example if echo $PATH shows /usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/X11/bin, each of those directories is searched in sequence for a given command (assuming the command isn't an alias or a shell builtin). If you want to override specific binaries on a per-user basis (or you just don't have access to ...



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