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in terminal type java -version and observe the version that appear. say, it is v1 in eclipse Window->Preferences->Java compiler, check version say it is v2 To work v2 must be <= v1, if eclipse has newer java version you need one of two: 1) install newer java on linux 2) downgrade java compiler in eclipse


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There is a "Reset" toolbar command to the right of compile. That will stop the running program in Dr. Java.


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You need to open it with java -jar Hello


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Is there a smart/secure/easy way to make these changes temporary for specific process? Environment variables such as $JAVA_HOME are inherited, not global to the system. So if you set one a specific way, it applies only to that process, and if exported, any process it spawns. The process here would be a shell instance; you can either do this on the ...


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It is possible to do that using the env command, however you have to use a little work around and call sh, see the following code snippets: # env var=bla echo $var > # env var=bla sh -c 'echo $var' > bla # echo $var > You can find more information using on info coreutils 'env invocation' Unfortunatelly I can't give you any further explanations ...


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This was a result of one of its dependencies: font-config, which sets the default font for many things.


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You may be able to do this. I would try this. First figure out what cent packages you would need. Then go get the rpms from either the 32 bit mirrors or the 64 bit. Now in Ubuntu make sure you have rpm2cpio and cpio installed. Then for each rpm you downloaded run: rpm2cpio [libname_something_version_something].rpm | cpio -idmv This will unpack a number ...


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There are no more log files you can check. Make sure that you catch each exception in your code and write a message via your logger and/or e.printStackTrace().


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The environment variable you should set is called 'CATALINA_OPTS'. Here is an example in the tomcat documentation, which is also related to monitoring: Apache Tomcat 7 - Monitoring and Managing Tomcat


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The first thing you don't understand is that we can't debug your iptables rules if you don't show them to us. That being said, I see a potential pitfall. But of course I don't know whether that is your problem. It's likely that the Java application establishes a TCP connection to the database once and for all when it starts. If your firewall merely blocks ...



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