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5

They are actually similar in being sound servers. JACK is designed for real-time/low-latency response, which is required by professional-level audio solutions. PulseAudio is targeted more at general desktop (where less strict needs apply). PA seems to be heavier than JACK - being more complex induces more overhead. On Linux both use ALSA for real output in ...


5

I can understand your confusion, i've been there :) Lets start with the fact that PulseAudio, like JACK are sound servers in a sense, with different aims in mind though. JACK is aimed at the professional audio user/ musician, while PA aims at providing ease of use. The audio route is a little different than what you have in your Q. ...


4

In my endeavor with Linux sound I have ended up disabling autospawning of Pulse Audio (so it doesn't restart when shut down): Add autospawn=no to ~/.pulse/client.conf. Stop with pactl exit Start with pulseaudio Doing live sound stuff or the like I shut down PA and run JACK only. No PA bridge. I have never gotten latency satisfactorily lowered using PA ...


3

You only choose audio card once when starting jackd. You can list cards available to alsa with aplay -l (aplay is part of alsa-utils). Then you can start the jack daemon, and pick the card to use with jackd -d alsa -d hw:<card>,<device>.


3

Ubuntu Studio. Dan of the Linux Outlaws podcast fame uses it for his podcast and music production.


2

It requires significantly different circuitry to drive speakers vs read an input signal (from a mic). That means the port would need to be multiplexed at a hardware level, not just in software. Because of this, it would add extra cost to the hardware. The extra cost combined with a very limited use case means you won't find many (if any) hardware devices ...


2

My espeak also returns similar messages: $ espeak -v en-us+3 -s 120 -k 20 "Pray. For. Moe. Jo." ALSA lib pcm.c:2212:(snd_pcm_open_noupdate) Unknown PCM cards.pcm.rear ALSA lib pcm.c:2212:(snd_pcm_open_noupdate) Unknown PCM cards.pcm.center_lfe ALSA lib pcm.c:2212:(snd_pcm_open_noupdate) Unknown PCM cards.pcm.side ALSA lib pcm_dmix.c:957:(snd_pcm_dmix_open) ...


1

Maybe the output doesn't all go to stdout. Try jack_cpu_load 2>&1 | sed -n 8p Or it is a buffering issue. Try stdbuf -i0 -o0 -e0 jack_cpu_load | sed -n 9p


1

No, for real time processing you would want to use Ardour


1

Each card has a number (also called "index"). Typically, a driver grabs the first free number, but it's possible to force drivers to use another number. It's also possible for numbers to remain free because they were used previously by an unplugged device. Each card has name (such as "HDA NVidia"), and a unique ID (such as "NVidia"). Each PCM device has a ...


1

The solution turned out to be simpler than it appeared. The output of fuser -v /dev/snd/* revealed jackd was silently hogging the audio card even after QjackCtl supposedly killed it. Running killall jackd fixed the problem. The problem wasn't with PulseAudio, but rather jackd running invisibly in the background.


1

AV Linux - optimised nimble Linux with lots of plugins and the newest version of Ardour. You can even test out the new Ardour3 beta with Midi support. Sadly the guy who made is stopping to make any new versions for the next time - but right now everything works really fine.


1

puredyne is made specifically for multimedia applications based on Ubuntu and Debian Live that can run from a CD or DVD, but it does not automatically start up Jack. There are several other distros for multimedia production, but as far as I know, none of these start Jack by default, and I do not know the state of development on these distros, so I include ...


1

Ubuntu Studio should be what you're looking for. It's a multimedia oriented distro based (obviously) on Ubuntu which uses a realtime kernel and the JACK Audio Connection Kit.


1

I figured this out a while ago. Turns out it was a CAS-ARMv7 patch to JACK that broke DBUS functionality and I managed to fix using this patch. The issues were resolved some time ago in the JACK subversion repository and it works fine now.


1

It seems like your missing permissions, does your distro set up an audio group? Is your user a member of that group? Which version of JACK do you have installed? JACK2 is preferred, and I believe Debian provides decent configurations. To install JACK2, run this command... sudo apt-get install jackd2 If you already have jack2 installed, do a ...



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