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19

You can do this without root access using the fuse module fuseiso. After fuse and fuseiso have been installed, you can do as a normal user fuseiso cdimage.iso ~/somedirectory to mount it. You may also need to add your user to the fuse group if you get permission errors when trying to use fuseiso.


19

Because AMD was the first one to release 64-bit x86 (x86-64) CPUs. the AMD64 architecture was positioned by AMD from the beginning as an evolutionary way to add 64-bit computing capabilities to the existing x86 architecture, as opposed to Intel's approach of creating an entirely new 64-bit architecture with IA-64. The first AMD64-based processor, ...


14

Try first to convert it into an iso file, with mdf2iso (you have to install it) like this : mdf2iso your_file.mdf Linux cannot mount mdf file (which is a closed format) natively. Or, you can try to rename it into "your_file.iso" and mount it with the command you gave, but it's not working with every mdf image. Or if you're using an X Server, you can try ...


12

The basic problem is that we want to take the md5sum of the exact same information that was on the ISO originally. When you write the ISO to a CD, there is likely blank space on the end of the disk, which inevitably changes the md5sum. Thus, the the very shortest way: md5sum /dev/cdrom doesn't work. What does work (and is common in online ...


11

An ISO file is a complete, formatted filesystem image. All cat or dd does is do a bit-for-bit copy of that filesystem image to your target media. There is no magic going on behind the scenes. The ISO filesystem preparation was done beforehand (often by a specialized tool). All cat does is write that collection of bytes out. It doesn't interpret the .iso at ...


11

AMD intially implemented x86-64, before Intel. For this reason, most distros (and other OSs such as OpenBSD) did a first release when it was still AMD only, or renaming to x86-64 wasn't considered worth the effort. I think one of the another contributing factors to this naming confusion was a conflict between Intel and AMD over naming. Intel had an identity ...


10

You got me curious how this would be done. The Pendrivelinux site had a tutorial I did this from my Mint 9 install instead of a live cd as the site suggests. I started with finding the location of my USB drive in a terminal I ran df it returned the location of the device as /dev/sdg1 /media/LINUXUSB after that I ran sudo su and then to install grub ...


10

You should clarify what you mean by extracting but as far as I understood: in the first case you copy each file and folder out of the ISO file. By making a copy you need to read everything and write everything to a different location mounting just makes the content available but does nothing else (no copy thus no read/write). The content is available as ...


9

ISO 9660 is by design a read-only file system. This means that all the data has to be written in one go to the medium. Once written, there is no provision for altering the stored content. Therefore ISO 9660 is not suitable to be used on random-writable media, such as hard disks. You need to copy whole directory tree to another directory, make your changes ...


8

Based on what you have described you should do something like this: dd if=/dev/urandom of=testfile bs=1M count=699 mkisofs -o test_cdrom.iso testfile Once done you can read and write to and from the optical media to your hearts content. One thing that I would suggest is that instead of pretesting the optical media and then attempting to write the actual ...


8

The ISO9660 standard does not allow names with other than A-Z, numbers and underscores. No matter which tool you use, if it just creates a plain ISO9660 filesystem, it will likely convert all filenames to respect these restrictions, and possibly even to fit into 8.3 filenames. Support for other characters in filenames, as well as longer filenames and other ...


7

You should look at bchunk, which is specifically meant for this type of conversion. You should be able to install it with sudo yum install bchunk, but I'm only 95% sure it's in the standard repo. bchunk will create an ISO from any data tracks, and CDR for any CD audio. If you want everything in one ISO bchunk is not appropriate. The syntax is like this, ...


7

Under the hood There is no more efficient way than copying the first file, then copying the second file after it, and so on. Both DOS copy and cat do that. Each file is stored independently of other files on the disk. Almost every filesystem designed to store data on a disk-like device operates by blocks. Here's a highly simplified presentation of what ...


6

Seems like there should be a more efficient way than piping all of the contents through the system's stdin / stdout Except that's not really what's happening. The shell is connecting the stdout of cat directly to the open file, which means that "going through stdout" is the same as writing to disk.


5

You could simply re-create the image "from scratch" with mkisofs. $ mkisofs -o new_image_name /path/to/the/mounted/dvd If you don't have the CD-ROM available anymore, loop-mount the iso image with: $ sudo mount -o loop /media/disk/linux.iso /path/to/the/mounted/dvd (And don't forget to unmount it.) This will not copy boot information from the DVD. If ...


5

GRUB2 Bootloader Full tutorial is a good place to start on multi boot configurations with GRUB2. If you are familiar with GRUB, jump straight to the 5th or 6th section. There is also a Superuser question on Setting up a multiboot system with GRUB. There is also a Ubuntu MultiOSBoot community page which suggests you should stick to the Legacy GRUB. The ...


5

That's just grub2's loop device feature. grub is able to read a number of filesystems and in addition to that to nest them, in that it is able to read files (an initrd and linux kernel above) inside a filesystem inside a file inside another file system. I has nothing to do with linux loop devices. Grub uses it just to load those kernel and initrd files in ...


4

My suggestion would be to use a good old fashioned CD/DVD. Manually installing all packages with dpkg is possible if you download each .deb along with its dependacies (and theirs, and theirs...) but really not pleasant. I would: download and burn the CD/DVD of the Debian distro you are using (check /etc/debian_version) if you dont have one Put the DVD in ...


4

You can't cat the two CentOS 6 ISOs together and get the combined version of them. cat them would work if they had been split from one big ISO file, but they're two distinct ISOs created separate from one another. If you're looking to combine the two DVDs in to one use the mkdvdiso.sh script from here and run it on a directory that contains the DVD1 and ...


4

what I do to distribute systems easily is create an image (using clonezilla over PXE and samba / nfs storage) and "cast" these images to different computers. This way I can rapidly restore images of my distributions. This is usefull if the hardware is quite the same. There is also an option to alter live-cd's. You can read more about this here. This is ...


3

One place to start would be Buildroot. What is it? It's a set of scripts / makefiles that allows you to produce a linux system literally from scratch. It pulls down all of the relevant components, builds the cross compiler on the host. - pretty much everything. It is designed primarily for embedded work - as such, it contains uclibc rather than glibc and ...


3

This works because the iso image was processed withisohybrid, which installs a normal syslinux boot loader into the iso image. This is possible because iso9660 does not normally use the first few sectors of the image, so a more or less normal hard disk boot loader can be placed there. When burned to an optical disk, it is ignored and the bios boots the ...


3

7.1 is located at ftp://distrib-coffee.ipsl.jussieu.fr/pub/linux/mandriva-prehistory/iso/7.1/i586/ for 7.0 an network install image is available at ftp://distrib-coffee.ipsl.jussieu.fr/pub/linux/mandriva-prehistory/7.0/images/ maybe ftp://ftp.orst.edu/pub/mirrors/linux_mirrors/mandrake/iso/mandrake70.iso is the image you are looking for?


3

It's due to the bootloader setup on the potentially-multi-boot USB drive. The Grub configuration for the drive is set up to boot the various OSes directly: it contains entries like menuentry "Ubuntu 10.10 Desktop ISO" { loopback loop /ubuntu.iso linux (loop)/casper/vmlinuz boot=casper iso-scan/filename=/ubuntu.iso noeject noprompt splash -- initrd ...


3

If you have control over both systems, you could share the data with NFS, mount it on your system, and burn your image just as you would if the data was local. There's also sshfs, which lets you mount a remote machine's filesystem using ssh as the data bearer.


3

Seems to be pretty straightforward to do with genisoimage, in the package with the same name on Debian: genisoimage -o output_image.iso directory_name There are many options to cover different cases, so you should check the man page to see what fits your particular use case. See also How-To: Create ISO Images from Command-Line


2

The easiest way is probably with sudo. Let's assume that you want everybody in the cdrom group able to mount and unmount ISO images. Make the following addition to the sudoers file using visudo: cdrom ALL = /bin/mount -o loop -t iso9660 *.iso /media/* cdrom ALL = /bin/umount /media/* This should allow anybody in the cdrom group to mount a file ending in ...


2

I would say that there is no software for this task since no software can compute the semantics of the files on your CD-image. How should K3B know which files have to be kept together? If the order of the files is not important - I would use tar and split for the task - like I did when floppies were still in use...


2

I ended up creating a zero file with dd, making a UDF filesystem on that with mkudffs, loop-mounting it, populating it, and then writing the UDF image with growisofs -Z /dev/dvd=foo.udf. Whether that's a best practice, I can't say, but it's a bit roundabout. On the other hand it does work. Packet writing led to much sadness and doesn't seem to work on ...


2

Furius ISO Mount relies on FuseIso, which is a FUSE filesystem. FUSE allows users to provide their own filesystem drivers without using specific code in the kernel. FUSE filesystems are restricted to the user who runs the driver process by default. You need to pass the option -o allow_root or allow_other to the fusermount or fuseiso mounting command. This ...



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