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The creation of the TCP RST packet is from your rule -A INPUT -p tcp -j REJECT --reject-with tcp-reset The default policy (ACCEPT in your case) only applies to packets that do not match any of the rules in your chain. If a packet matches the rule above with the REJECT target, it will not be subject to the default policy and will be REJECTed (and generate ...


3

towards the first item (quickly & easily): from the router, you should be able to use netstat -natp to show you a list of all active tcp connections. from your pc, try using nmap -v -sn 192.168.1.0/24 (substitute with your local net) to run a basic ping scan your local net. this should show you everyone connected (even via wifi). towards the second ...


3

Extending the great answer by @casey: The cause for this is that the package from remote has the SYN and ACK flags set. This is INVALID for a first package. iptables does not consider the reset packet as RELATED to the initial packet, as it clearly makes no sense. The effect can be reproduced using a tool like hping3: A SYN/ACK packet is sent with hping3 ...


2

It sounds like you want to use the bonding driver. This will use one of your interfaces and, if it goes down, it will jump to the other one. I would try changing the /etc/network/interfaces to something like this: auto bond0 iface bond0 inet dhcp bond-slaves none bond-mode active-backup bond-miimon 100 auto eth0 iface eth0 inet manual ...


2

The entry for ip addr show demonstrates that your server has only a local address: inet 10.1.4.20/16 brd 10.4.255.255 scope global eth0 You need to review your external NAT device that maps your 55.27.XX.XX address to 10.1.4.20 and provide port forwarding for port tcp/85.


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/etc/rc.local is a symlink to /etc/rc.d/rc.local in CentOS 7 so you have to ensure that /etc/rc.d/rc.local is executable if you want to start things this way, so you can do: chmod +x /etc/rc.d/rc.local and then to start the service: systemctl start rc-local


2

In your command ping -c 1 -t 1 192.168.236.2 You are specifying that the packets are to be send with a TTL of 1. This means they will traverse at most one network hop before producing an error. In your network configuration your CentOS 6.3 node is not directly connected to the NAT you are trying to reach. The CentOS 6.5 node is between the two. When you ...


2

Short answer: No, one cannot configure it that way. Iptables is part of the kernel and only takes a limited number of options. It's possible only to add additional information to the output, e.g. sequence numbers and message prefixes. Dropping information is not possible. One possibility would be to use rsyslog to process the logging output. There are ...


2

DSR method The most efficient way would be to configure Direct Server Return mode correctly on Netscaler, where Netscaler does MAC based forwarding to the syslog server with destination VIP address unchanged (10.10.0.15). The syslog server also needs to have that VIP address in order to receive packets forwarded from Netscaler. The address can be assigned ...


2

The above iptables config will only let TCP and UDP packets get past the firewall (unless they came from loopback). The default rule of the INPUT chain has been set to DROP, meaning that every packet that isn't explicitly ACCEPTed will be discarded. There should be no weird packets from loopback, so only TCP/UDP packets are allowed in. There is one major ...


1

It's highly unlikely to be related to the CPU chipset. It's more likely to be related to the NIC. If you're sharing the same hard disk and OS installation between two different machines, the NIC will be different so the MAC for that NIC will be different. Therefore it will almost certainly be bound on configuration to eth0 but to eth1 on the other. You can ...


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Obviously RewriteRule matching anything causes the loop. Disable it. If you want to simply redirect http://haustor.org/ to http://cpt.haustor.org/, declare <VirtualHost> for each virtual host. <VirtualHost *:8081> ServerName haustor.org Redirect / http://cpt.haustor.org/ </VirtualHost> <VirtualHost *:8081> ServerName ...


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This looks like it could be part of a port scan initiated from tcp/80 on the remote host. The remote host probes your service tcp/3594 and your system correctly says "No. Now go away (RST)". Unfortunately fairly normal stuff for Internet connecting systems. You might like to install fail2ban, which can be very good at blocking hosts trying to connect to ...


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As per http://serverfault.com/a/373875/145318: The [0:0] or [1280:144299] or whatever are the count of [Packets:Bytes] that have been trough the chain . They are saved when you run an iptables-save command and are used by the iptables-restore command to initialise the counters.


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You should be able to re-compile it using something to the similar commands. make KERNEL_DIR=/usr/src/linux make install KERNEL_DIR=/usr/src/linux make dep make bzIamge make make install make modules Source: iptables: Table does not exist (do you need to insmod?)



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