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8

These addresses are coming from your private network or are somehow spoofed. Addresses from 10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255 are reserved for private networks (not connected to the internet) http://tldp.org/HOWTO/IP-Masquerade-HOWTO/addressing-the-lan.html


4

Most people use firewalls for that. Have a look at iptables to restrict traffic to port 22 i.e.: iptables -I INPUT -p tcp '!' -s 8.8.8.8 --dport 22 -j REJECT Or, if the firewall is already restrictive, allow just one address: iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -s 8.8.8.8 --dport 22 -j ACCEPT Please note that this is not a full configuration for an iptables ...


3

Those IP Address will have no Country of Origin, as they are deemed Private Class A addresses. From my /etc/hosts file: # # According to RFC 1918, you can use the following IP networks for private # nets which will never be connected to the Internet: # # 10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 # 172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255 # ...


2

You can get a list of potentially affected services by looking what's in that range in your local /etc/services file, e.g.: awk '/^#/ { next } $2+0 >= 16000 && $2+0 < 32768 { print }' /etc/services Or at the authoritative place: wget http://www.iana.org/assignments/service-names-port-numbers/service-names-port-numbers.csv awk -F, '$2+0 ...


2

You can add the range option to the socat listening address: socat TCP-LISTEN:22,fork,range=8.8.8.8/32 TCP:192.168.0.15:5900 Or you can add the tcpwrap=vnc_forward option and define global rules for that tcp_forward service as per hosts_access(5). That won't stop the connections from reaching socat, but socat will ignore them (with a warning) if they ...



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