Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

$ printf '%s\n' 10.0.{100..224}.\* 10.0.100.* 10.0.101.* 10.0.102.* 10.0.103.* 10.0.104.* 10.0.105.* [...snip...]


3

ip and ifup serve different purposes, and are complimentary. ip should not be used to replace ifup. Actually, ifup operates at a higher level. ifconfig (traditional, portable) and ip (Linux-only, but much better interface) are two commands that serve the same purpose. They are for setting interface configuration directly. ip does indeed fully replace ...


2

fe80::/64 is a ipv6 address reserved to Link-local. ip a l dev eth1 should be enough to show your ip address on this specific interface(if assigned or acquired through a dhcp-server). Worth reading: Why is fe80::/10 reserved for link local addresses when fe80::/64 is actually used? Where is the statement of deprecation of ifconfig (on linux)? - best ...


2

From your output: arrakis:~ # ip route 127.0.0.0/8 dev lo scope link 192.168.0.0/24 dev enp5s0 proto kernel scope link src 192.168.0.21 arrakis:~ # You don't have a default route. So you can only reach things on 127.0.0.0/8 (localhost) or 192.168.0.0/24 (the local subnet). Add a default route and you should be good to go.


2

Use ip route get. From Configuring Network Routing : The ip route get command is a useful feature that allows you to query the route on which the system will send packets to reach a specified IP address, for example: # ip route get 23.6.118.140 23.6.118.140 via 10.0.2.2 dev eth0 src 10.0.2.15 cache mtu 1500 advmss 1460 hoplimit 64 ...


1

ip route replace default via 172.30.0.1 src 172.30.0.122


1

Try sed: $ sed -i 's/[0-9]\+$/\*/' file.txt 10.0.100.* 10.0.101.* 10.0.102.* EDIT: If you want to generate the range first and then replace the last octet try this: To generate the range you can use echo 10.0.{100..224}.0 | tr ' ' '\n' (John1024's answer shows another way using printf). Now to replace the last octet with * and save it to a file: $ ...


1

Save the following script somewhere useful. Call it with the IP Address that you want to test and it will tell you the corresponding route. #!/bin/bash # # Find the appropriate routing entry for a given IP address ######################################################################## ...


1

The default behavior is to add a interface that will only accept packets where the 802.1q field is the same as the vlan id to this given interface. In a very simplified way, the Mac address will be the same as the parent, so the packet is delivered to the phy interface, and processed by the kernel, searching for a 802.1q Tag field that is right after the ...


1

ifup is higher layer tool - which use config files to up and confiture interfaces. If you wish to do it by ip command you can use something like: ip link set eth0 up # to bring interface up ip a a 192.168.1.4/24 dev eth0 # to add address to interface ip route add default via 192.168.1.1 # to add default route via gateway in that interface If you wish to ...


1

This is due to a procedure called Autonegotiation, which happens at the physical layer. As far as the kernel is concerned, that link (connection) can only handle a bandwidth of 10 Mbps, and iperf presumably respects that maximum connection speed. The good folks over at http://networkengineering.stackexchange.com/ can probably go into more detail if you have ...


1

ipinfo.io has nice JSON API for using from command line: $ curl ipinfo.io { "ip": "X.X.X.X", "hostname": "No Hostname", "city": "Hanoi", "region": "Ha Noi", "country": "VN", "loc": "21.0333,105.8500", "org": "AS18403 The Corporation for Financing & Promoting Technology" }



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible