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Here are some steps you can take. Ensure that your Linux kernel version is at least 3.19 and that you have the Intel Linux NVMe drivers installed. If that does not help consider installing the Linux NVMe command line interface. Hope this helps.


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/dev/{stdout,stdin,stderr} work in Bash on these platforms: Linux debian-ppc 3.16.0-4-powerpc #1 Debian 3.16.7-ckt25-1 (2016-03-06) ppc GNU/Linux HP-UX hpux-ia6 B.11.31 U ia64 0107668277 unlimited-user license AIX aix7 1 7 000ACFDE4C00 FreeBSD freebsd.polarhome.com 10.0-RELEASE-p7 FreeBSD 10.0-RELEASE-p7 #0: Tue Jul 8 06:37:44 UTC 2014 ...


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One issue with /dev/stdout and friends is that you may not have permission to write to them in certain circumstances. For example, I've encountered this when invoking scripts from Nix, and I imagine similar tools which run scripts in jails/sandboxes/containers/VMs/etc. may encounter similar issues. Using syntax like 1>&2 worked in these cases and, ...


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You can do this with find: cd top_level_dir find . -type f -exec bash -c "echo -n '' > {}" \; For every filename it invokes Bash (not very efficient) and echos, without newline because of the -n, essentially nothing to the file, thereby overwriting its contents and creating a zero length file. If you have a lot of files and/or have to this often a ...


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My understanding of the question is that, you need to create a large file, each line of this file is a random word within specified length. If you don't need the word to be a real word, but some random characters: < /dev/urandom tr -d -c '[:alpha:]'|head -c 1M|fold -w10 >result.txt This will create a file of size 1M and each line with 10 random ...


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If you want to prevent disk writes as much as possible, you can do this with Laptop Mode. One of the features of laptop mode is to allow a disk to spin down and to prevent the kernel from writing to it until memory gets full or until a timeout occurs (or until the disk needs to spin up in order to read data from it). See also the Arch Wiki. You'll presumably ...


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sounds like a job for eatmydata ( http://www.makelinux.net/man/1/E/eatmydata ) in debian, try something like apt-get install eatmydata; printf "\nLD_PRELOAD=libeatmydata.so" >> /etc/ld.so.preload reboot



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