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11

The traditional unix command at is usually used for this purpose. e.g. echo 'sudo port install gcc45' | at midnight


8

Short answer: not possible. The difficulty of getting the exact dependencies from a source distribution is the reason why package management is so popular on Linux (okay, one of several reasons). In fact, if you just need to get it done and don't care so much how, the most reliable way to get the dependencies will probably be to grab a distro package (gentoo ...


8

In my experience always install Windows as first OS. Otherwise it will overwrite the boot loader of the previously installed OS. There are ways around it, but these just make it more complicated. After installing Windows, install your first Linux distribution. It normally will find your Windows installation and add it to its boot loader automatically so you ...


7

If you are using Red Hat Enterprise Linux, I do not think ncdu is in the RHEL server repositories, repositories. I do not have a machine where I can check if it is in the workstation repositories, but I suspect it isn't. If it isn't, one option is the use EPEL (faq): EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux) is a volunteer-based community effort ...


7

Either you are patient and stick with what you have, or you find an official backport, or you find some unofficial backports, or you build your own package. The details depend on the particular package. For example, in the case of PostgreSQL, you can either wait a few more weeks until the package officially enters some Ubuntu version, at which point also ...


6

config.sub is one of files generated by autoconf. Autoconf documentations states that it converts system aliases into full canonical names. In short - you don't have to worry about it unless you're autoconf developer.


5

There are three kinds of ISOs: First the DVD-ISO which is the best suited for you, I think. Then there is a set of CD images which only make sense to download if you need physical disks but don't have a DVD burner and thirdly the netinstall ISO which you seem to have downloaded. To find a mirror which has the DVD isos directly available for download, have a ...


5

The dhcp server doesn't actually serve the file. The dhcp server assigns an IP address to a host (pxe client) which lacks an operating system when it boots. In addition to the IP address, the dhcp server can tell the pxe client that it should contact a separate server for a boot loader and then the pxe client downloads the boot loader (usually using tftp) ...


5

As I found here sudo grep ubiquity /var/log/installer/syslog | less should work for Ubuntu. last works for Fedora.


5

In your installer, at the partitioning stage: Resize your Ubuntu partition to something smaller; a decent partitioner will tell you the limits in which you can do this. For example if the data in a 100GB Ubuntu partition is taking 80GB, you cannot resize it to a smaller size than that. Create a fresh partition in the empty space, and install Fedora there. ...


4

The recommended way is to use the software versions your distribution provides, i.e. sudo apt-get install postgresql is correct. This might not always be the most recent version released upstream, but in most cases one doesn't really need the latest one. If you (think you) need the very latest version of everything, you might want to use a distribution ...


4

Building from source There isn't any programmatic way that I'm aware of, I generally look through the release notes and/or software README files to get a general idea. This works out to be an iterative process where I might find a library or two that I don't have or missed and need to go get them. Building using a package manager If on the other hand ...


4

Most of the significant (including Fedora and Ubuntu) distributions prefer to install from a boot cd-rom or usb-stick these days. Windows need not part of the process at all. Wubi is a windows application that can run Linux from a Windows file pretending to be a boot disk. Its purpose is to be have zero-impact on the Windows system: You keep Windows as ...


4

Why don't you think of Fedora? Perhaps you think it cannot be installed with a single CD? It has always been an option, to install Fedora from the first ISO in the series. That was quite misleading but if you read the description carefully enough there is text that says something like "Only first CD is required, the rest are just additional software". In ...


4

Make the banana.3 man page a symbolic link to the apple.3 page: install-man: apple.3 install ... apple.3 $(mandir)/man3/apple.3 ln -s apple.3 $(mandir)/man3/banana.3 ln -s apple.3 $(mandir)/man3/carrot.3


4

While it's possible to rebuild a Red Hat CD ISO image, you might benefit from using the Kickstart mechanism available on existing Red Hat CDs/DVDs. This is how I do something very similar to what you're asking. Simply create a kickstart and add a %post section that does whatever you're planning to do. You'll need to find a way to copy over the tar file, ...


4

$HOME in version control Periodically commit everything in the /home directory to the version control repositories. (Except always do "make superclean" just before committing the programmer's $HOME directory, so he never commits binary executables or other easily-machine-generated files). For each user that "owns" unique data on my work computer, make sure ...


4

The canonical reference for this is The OpenBSD FAQ - 5.1 The install4.8.iso in the 4.8 directory is the 4.8 before patches. So, if you want the patches, you need to install 4.8 then patch your system yourself. The install48.iso in the snapshots directory is more than just the patches to the OS listed on the errata page, it's also everything new that is ...


4

Because the full debian distribution for even a single architecture now well exceeds seven DVDs, and the packages on each DVD are sorted by popularity, not by common theme. Every single installation manual strongly recommends installing from a minimal CD or USB image (100 MB or less, generally) and installing over the internet, or a local apt proxy if you ...


4

You have the ssh program. You don't have the package called ssh. Ubuntu splits ssh into two packages: openssh-server and openssh-client. The reason for the split is that many people just need the client, not the server. Having the server installed and running when you don't want it isn't just (tiny) a waste of resources, it's a security risk if you have ...


4

Since I use CentOS, which is a RHEL variant, the rpm command will need to be executed in terminal to accomplish this (I believe so) While RPM is used to work with the actual packages, RHEL and friends now use yum to make it less tedious. Yum lets you install software through repositories, local or remote collections of RPM packages and index files, and ...


3

The packages are cryptographically signed, and the yum package installer does check those signatures when you add packages after the fact. The initial installer, however, does not check package signatures. This is a difficult problem, because: how to you verify that the cryptographic signatures you have on your install media are good when you don't, by ...


3

I don't know if that functionality is offered by typical installers, but it is easy enough to do from a live CD (or live USB or whatever). Both SystemRescueCD and GParted Live have the required tools readily available (there are undoubtedly many other suitable live distributions). Note that you need to boot from a separate system as ext3 filesystems cannot ...


3

My experience : Knowledge : There are only 4 primary in a a disk . Make 2 NTFS for windows OS and one for common data. Install windows first Install linux , make 2 linux partition : 1 ext 4 and 1 swap for linux installing . Install ntfs-3g to access ntfs in your linux . My example : Laptop 500Gb : C: 50Gb for windows OS [NTFS] D: 436Gb for Common ...


3

PackageKit, the default package management tool in Fedora 13, does not include a method and it's unlikely that they ever will as it's a deliberate design choice to not include repository management. However, could you instead package up the repo file into an RPM and distribute that? By default RPMs will open with Package Installer and that's GUI based.


3

Next time I need to pay attention to where I install Ubuntu. If it is on an external media, like in this case, I either need to leave the drive plugged in, although I dont believe you can readily boot an OS via USB, or install Ubuntu locally.


3

Apparently, with this model, the parport_pc module causes udev to hang[1]. You might have to blacklist this module to successfully install Arch. Adding disablemodules=parport_pc to your kernel line[2] should allow udev to proceed. [1] http://www.mail-archive.com/arch-general@archlinux.org/msg11658.html [2] When the iso boots and you see the grub menu, ...


3

Only the first is enough. It will even have at least one complete Desktop environment, GNOME. The way the content is organised is such that the most popular packages (according to popcon) are in the earlier discs.


3

It's easy and low-risk. Just do the installation normally, and when the time comes to partition the disk, choose a manual partitioning strategy and make sure you override the Suse partition(s) only. Ubuntu will want to override Suse's bootloader with its own. Let it: Grub needs some files in /boot, which you're going to overwrite. The Grub installer will ...



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