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19

Since you're using CentOS 5, the default package manager is yum, not apt-get. To install a program using it, you'd normally use the following command: $ sudo yum install <packagename> However, when trying to install git this way, you'll encounter the following error on CentOS 5: $ sudo yum install git Setting up Install Process Parsing package ...


17

You can technically install just a bootloader and the kernel alone, but as soon as the kernel boots, it will complain about not being able to start "init", then it will just sit there and you can't do anything with it. BTW, it is a part of the bootloader that is in the MBR. The kernel sits somewhere on the regular area of a disk. The bootloader is ...


8

Thinkpads are very popular with Linux users, so there's a lot of documentation out there. The standard resource for Thinkpad users is ThinkWiki. It's quite likely that a standard distro install will be sufficient. The Linux kernel probably includes all the drivers you need. Possible exceptions are the graphics drivers (look at the Nvidia or ATI websites for ...


8

Short answer: not possible. The difficulty of getting the exact dependencies from a source distribution is the reason why package management is so popular on Linux (okay, one of several reasons). In fact, if you just need to get it done and don't care so much how, the most reliable way to get the dependencies will probably be to grab a distro package (gentoo ...


8

In my experience always install Windows as first OS. Otherwise it will overwrite the boot loader of the previously installed OS. There are ways around it, but these just make it more complicated. After installing Windows, install your first Linux distribution. It normally will find your Windows installation and add it to its boot loader automatically so you ...


8

Most packages will have a <package>-dev (for Debian based) or <package>-devel (for Red Hat based) that will be the libraries needed to link against for building. So, for example if the source says it requires libxml, in Debian based systems you'll find libxml2 and libxml2-dev (use apt-cache search <dependancy> to find them). You'll need ...


7

If you are using Red Hat Enterprise Linux, I do not think ncdu is in the RHEL server repositories, repositories. I do not have a machine where I can check if it is in the workstation repositories, but I suspect it isn't. If it isn't, one option is the use EPEL (faq): EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux) is a volunteer-based community effort ...


7

Either you are patient and stick with what you have, or you find an official backport, or you find some unofficial backports, or you build your own package. The details depend on the particular package. For example, in the case of PostgreSQL, you can either wait a few more weeks until the package officially enters some Ubuntu version, at which point also ...


7

How about downloading the CD1 ISO, then put it on a USB and boot? (My favourite) How about using an automated tool such as UNetbootin? Here is another tool from Pendrivelinux.


7

Usually I try to run it without sudo anyway - sometimes it works. Sometimes package creators think sudo is required, they use it due to their preference, or otherwise choose to install things in non-user areas of the system. Sometimes this is necessary, but many times it isn't. The other common reason I see for the use of sudo is in blog posts by 3rd ...


6

You can create a list of the installed software with: $ rpm -qa > installed-software.log Since they are based on different distros, I am not sure how you would do the install. If I was copying it to a fresh install of the same distro, I would run the following command as root # yum -y install $(cat /home/user/installed-software.log)


6

config.sub is one of files generated by autoconf. Autoconf documentations states that it converts system aliases into full canonical names. In short - you don't have to worry about it unless you're autoconf developer.


6

As of Debian 6.0 (Squeeze), the netinstall and disc 1 of the regular install CD/DVDs are 'hybrid' ISOs. They can be burned to an optical disc and booted or copied onto a USB drive and booted. To copy the ISO onto a USB drive from a linux system all you need to do is cat the ISO onto the drive. cat debian.iso > /dev/sdX ...


6

Any real virtualization needs low-level access to the CPU, and thus root must install it. Once installed you don't need to be root to run it. You could probably install and run an emulator as non-root, such as bochs, or an adapter such as wine. If you have a specific Windows app in mind you could just run it under wine (maybe).


6

For KVM, you need access to the device /dev/kvm. If your user can read/write to this device, then you can run KVM-based virtual machines as your user. For most other accelerated technologies, you will need kernel modules loaded (this includes virtualbox and VMWare). This almost certainly requires root-level access. You can run non-accelerated ...


6

Avoid making local installs into system directories. The system directories eg /usr, are reserved for the package management system to use. By definition, if you are doing make install that means you are making a local install, and if you need to do sudo make install that means you don't have permission to wherever you are writing. So, if you are getting ...


6

You can do this without problems if you know what you're doing. You only need to watch about partition sizes (don't use more space then you have on your target machine's hdd), you have to compile the kernel for the target machine (select the drivers etc. for the target machine, not the machine you're using to compile it), and don't forget to check the ...


5

There are three kinds of ISOs: First the DVD-ISO which is the best suited for you, I think. Then there is a set of CD images which only make sense to download if you need physical disks but don't have a DVD burner and thirdly the netinstall ISO which you seem to have downloaded. To find a mirror which has the DVD isos directly available for download, have a ...


5

The dhcp server doesn't actually serve the file. The dhcp server assigns an IP address to a host (pxe client) which lacks an operating system when it boots. In addition to the IP address, the dhcp server can tell the pxe client that it should contact a separate server for a boot loader and then the pxe client downloads the boot loader (usually using tftp) ...


5

In your installer, at the partitioning stage: Resize your Ubuntu partition to something smaller; a decent partitioner will tell you the limits in which you can do this. For example if the data in a 100GB Ubuntu partition is taking 80GB, you cannot resize it to a smaller size than that. Create a fresh partition in the empty space, and install Fedora there. ...


5

Ubuntu's Wiki As @Hippo mentioned you can look at the LTS page which has this chart: Wikipedia Page Also wikipedia has a nice chart: Ubuntu EC2 List Finally, Ubuntu provides a directory of their EC2 images: http://uec-images.ubuntu.com/releases/ And a list of official Ubuntu AMI images: http://cloud.ubuntu.com/ami/


5

It depends if you're installing it for you or for all users. (Mostly. Some things like kernel modules will require root access regardless of who will use the end features.) Most programs that provide a ./configure script also accept a --prefix=~/bin or --prefix=~/Local/ so that you can install it into your home directory. Not all programs provide a ...


5

I would say the answer is maybe but I wouldn't do it and I would STRONGLY recommend you DO NOT TO ATTEMPT IT. The idea is fairly simple but requires perfect execution which Murphy's Law will mess up. If your hardware has PXE boot and another Linux machine on the network where your server resides you can set up a Network Boot Environment wipe your MBR on ...


5

One option to achieve your goal is to "roll" your own RPM. It's not a trivial task, but once you understand the process, it can be done fairly painlessly in just a few steps (depending on the level of sophistication required for the software). I have to install a lot of built from source software for my customers, and I find that when possible, taking the ...


5

Chrome is not opensource... If you want to install Chromium on F17 you should use this repo : http://repos.fedorapeople.org/repos/spot/chromium-stable/ Here's a full tuto : https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Chromium Ps : Why Chromium Isn't in Fedora : http://ostatic.com/blog/making-projects-easier-to-package-why-chromium-isnt-in-fedora Enjoy


4

The mount point specifies at which location in the directory hierarchy a device or disk partition appears. If you want to move /home to a new partition, you have to create a new partition for it, say /dev/sda4 and format it, e.g. with ext4. Creating partitions and formatting them can be comfortably done using e.g. gparted. Then you have to copy the old ...


4

Building from source There isn't any programmatic way that I'm aware of, I generally look through the release notes and/or software README files to get a general idea. This works out to be an iterative process where I might find a library or two that I don't have or missed and need to go get them. Building using a package manager If on the other hand ...


4

Most of the significant (including Fedora and Ubuntu) distributions prefer to install from a boot cd-rom or usb-stick these days. Windows need not part of the process at all. Wubi is a windows application that can run Linux from a Windows file pretending to be a boot disk. Its purpose is to be have zero-impact on the Windows system: You keep Windows as ...


4

The recommended way is to use the software versions your distribution provides, i.e. sudo apt-get install postgresql is correct. This might not always be the most recent version released upstream, but in most cases one doesn't really need the latest one. If you (think you) need the very latest version of everything, you might want to use a distribution ...


4

Why don't you think of Fedora? Perhaps you think it cannot be installed with a single CD? It has always been an option, to install Fedora from the first ISO in the series. That was quite misleading but if you read the description carefully enough there is text that says something like "Only first CD is required, the rest are just additional software". In ...



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