New answers tagged

3

Some quick answers: first, you didn't create a sparse file. Try these extra commands dd if=/tmp/BIL of=/tmp/sparse seek=1000 ls -ls /tmp/sparse You will see the size is 512003 bytes, but only takes 8 blocks. The null bytes have to occupy a whole block, and be on a block boundary for them to be possibly sparse in the filesystem. Why does the second ...


2

Structures fetched from Ultrix 3.0 v7 of restor so variations can occur: ftp://ftp.uvsq.fr/pub/tuhs/PDP-11/Distributions/dec/Ultrix-3.0/v7restor/include/sys/ The s5fs is rather archaic but ...: Disk layout could be something like: [B][S][Inode List][ Data Blocks ] | | | +-- Super Block +----- Boot Area The Super Block holds data for the file ...


1

Finally found the answer from somebody else on another site, just zeroed the inodes and rechecked the system, that was all! debugfs -w /dev/sda2 :clri <1415> :clri <1416> :clri <1417> :q fsck -y /dev/sda2 To anybody else with this issue, I found my bad inodes using find on the bad mount, then checked dmesg for errors on the bad inodes.


1

If you have a ext2/3/4 filesystem you can use debugfs for a low-level look at an inode. For example, to play without being root: $ truncate -s 1M myfile $ mkfs.ext2 -F myfile $ debugfs -w myfile debugfs: stat <2> Inode: 2 Type: directory Mode: 0755 Flags: 0x0 Generation: 0 Version: 0x00000000 User: 0 Group: 0 Size: ...


-1

an inode wil store only one file. try find /xxx -xdev -inum 1234 -print where /xxx is mounting point -inum 1234 search for an inode number 1234 -print self explainatory This suppose /xxx is mounted an healthy.



Top 50 recent answers are included