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I have an alternate solutions for this situation. Lets say you have 1000 inodes in a partition of 10G. But due to inodes limit you are not suppose to use all space of partition. But in this solutions you will be able to use the remaining space of the partition without formatting it. $ df -i # see list ( I need just one free inode here so move just one file ...


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You cannot access files by inodes, because that would break access control via permissions. For example, if you don't have the permission to traverse a directory, then you can't access any of the files in that directory no matter what the permissions on the file are. If you could access a file by inode, that would bypass directory permissions. Thus, while ...


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@Costas already gave you the best answer, to replay to your second question But this is very cumbersome and I would like to try to find a way to parse the output from ls -i Simplex_config*.csv and pipe it to another command in a one-liner -- is there such an option available? you can just use xargs: ls -i | cut -d ' ' -f 1 | xargs -I '$input' find ...


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1. find . -type f -name 'Simplex*.csv' -print0 | xargs -0 cat > looksee.txt From man xargs --null -0 Input items are terminated by a null character instead of by whitespace, and the quotes and backslash are not special (every character is taken literally). Disables the end of file string, which is treated like any other ...


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By default, ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystems have 5% of the space reserved for the root user. This makes sense for the root filesystem in a typical configuration: it means that the system won't grind to a halt if a user fills up the disk, critical functionality will still work and in particular logs can still be written. It doesn't make sense in most other ...


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inode 0 is used as a NULL value, to indicate that there is no inode. indoe 1 is used to keep track of any bad blocks on the disk; it is essentially a hidden file containing the bad blocks. Those bad blocks which are recorded using e2fsck -c. indoe 2 is used by the root directory which indicates starting of File system inodes


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Under most typical use cases, most filesystems created with default settings will have way more inodes than they will ever need. But that's actually a pretty good tradeoff considering: The inode table doesn't really waste all that much space, all in all. It's almost never worth reducing the number of inodes just to squeeze the last few bytes of available ...


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In ext4 the Inode 1 is used for bad blocks. The link below the the kernel site describes which Inode is used for what purpose. https://ext4.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Ext4_Disk_Layout#Special_inodes


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Assuming that there are no symbolic links or mount points involved Bill gives a good answer. If there are symbolic links involved, the number would be much higher. Also if there are mounts involved you would need two inodes per mount point instead of one.


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I would expect three /, hello and file. Changing permissions of any one of these can limit access to file.



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