Tag Info

New answers tagged

8

To answer your question with at least a hint of factual background I propose to start by looking at the timeline of creation of man, info and other documentation systems. The first man page was written in 1971 using troff (nroff was not around yet) in a time when working on a CRT based terminal was not common and printing of manual pages the norm. The man ...


2

An alternative to the methods provided by @Renan and @jimmij yields wireshark-filter the big winner on my system. for i in {1..9}; do du -sh man"$i"/*.gz | grep -v "^..0K" | grep -v "^0\|^12K\|^16K\|^[0-9][0-9]K" ; done Based on that I did a opened each of the largest entries with man and checked the number of lines at the end of the file with a :f and ...


9

You can calculate it yourself for your system with simple command $ find /usr/share/man/ -type f -exec ls -S {} + 2>/dev/null | head | while \ read -r file; do printf "%-40s" "$file"; \ man "$file" 2>/dev/null | wc -lwm; done | sort -nrk 4 which returns on my box (file) (lines) (words) (chars) ...


3

Man pages are stored in /usr/share/man/manX where X is the section (described in man man). They're compressed in gzip format, so let's assume a larger compressed file means a bigger manpage. By checking in /usr/share/man/man1 (section 1: Executable programs or shell commands) with the command gzip -l *.gz | sort -n -k2, I get this (which will probably vary ...


2

help is a built-in command in the bash shell (and that shell only) that documents some of the builtin commands and keywords of that shell. That's an internal documentation system of that shell. Other shells have their own documentation system (ksh93 has --help and --man options for its builtins, zsh has a run-help helper that extracts information from ...



Top 50 recent answers are included