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2

You can use the commande file e,g: file images.jpg the output is something like : images.jpg: JPEG image data, JFIF standard 1.01, aspect ratio, density 1x1, segment length 16, baseline, precision 8, 342x147, frames 3 OR rdjpgcom -verbose images.jpg sample output JPEG image is 342w * 147h, 3 color components, 8 bits per sample JPEG process: ...


4

I can only address the first part of your question: You can view the dimensions of an image on the command line by the using the identify tool, part of the the imagemagick package. (To install imagemagick on a Debian box, provided you have sudo privileges, you can run sudo apt-get install imagemagick ). For example, in a directory with image file rose.jpg, ...


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There are number of tools that will do this: identify from ImageMagick jhead jpeginfo some versions of the file command If these programs are not installed, note that both jhead and jpeginfo are quite simple and presuming a compiler is available will be easy to build in your own user account.


1

pictures for review in video... ffmpeg can be used to assemble a set of images into a movie for review. The frame rate can be set to an interval of your choosing. Also, the video can be scrubbed, stepped through, or be played at various rates with program such as VLC media player. #!/bin/bash cd "/path/to/png/files" echo "DIRECTORY:" `pwd` > ...


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I just found this page, and it is still very relevant today. OP didn't really specify if they want X or fb viewer. I use a small utility called pho: http://www.shallowsky.com/software/pho/ Needs X, so call from command line in a terminal window. Views many picture formats, gif and jpg for sure... some others as well. Can do wildcard globbing from command ...


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From the terminal? Why not in the terminal: cacaview might be the fastest. By default it's fastest if the terminal has no graphics. In Debian: sudo apt-get install caca-utils


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This is a 4 year-old-question but I found that people still look at it. So, today I would like to answer my own question specifically only for iTerm2. At first time I asked this question. The term of "fastest" I was thinking of viewing image as fast as cat command displaying text. So, today I found the answer on iTerm2, which are the two handy commands ...


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A solution is to look for the *.desktop file for that particular program (for example, photoshop.desktop) and add % F at the end of the line starting with Exec I did this process for stata14. In my Ubuntu 15.01 machine I found the file in the following folder cd /usr/share/applications/ sudo vim stata14.desktop The file initially was like this: 1 ...



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