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13

Write a Makefile, then you can simply: :make from inside vim. And if compilation fails: :copen will show you warning and errors. Selecting them will take you to the appropriate file and line.


12

Emacs/Vim/Eclipse/... - Personally I am an Emacs user. If you find the control sequences tire your pinky, just Viper-Mode it up. Emacs is so well integrated into unix, making it very easy to control everything all from one place. Vim also does a good job here, but I find Elisp to be a much more powerful extension language than Vim Script. One could talk ...


9

There is a vendor independent SAT (SCSI/ATA transfer) standard, but AFAIK this is not widely supported on (cheaper) bridges. There are several vendor specific ATA pass-through commands that you can select with smartctl with the -d option: -d TYPE, --device=TYPE Specify device type to one of: ata, scsi, sat[,N][+TYPE], usbcypress[,X], ...


9

Even though they type vi or call it vi it may still be vim. And at least vim can do all the "modern" features like auto-completion and syntax-highlighting, too. It can also mark/copy/paste text using the mouse if you wish. I however prefer vim and the console because I can do 100% of the work without ever taking one hand off the keyboard. Try that with a ...


7

The two most common suggestions you will hear are vim and emacs. Both are good programmable text-editors that are used by many developers. I am an occasional, amature programmer and an emacs user so here are some of the pros of using emacs: Syntax Highlighting Smart Code Navigation & Editing: c-mode allows you to quickly move between various sections ...


7

In vim, the current file can be referred to as %, so :!python % See :he cmdline-special (or here)


7

For developing C/C++ you need the gcc compiler, which is included in most Linux distributions or can be easily installed. There is not a default IDE: most people use their favorite editor (vim, emacs, Geany etc...) and there are IDEs like Eclipse or KDevelop available. C# can be done with Mono, but it is not fully compatible with .NET: check the ...


6

If you don't like makefiles for some reason you can call any command with :! For example you can use ":!javac *.java && java Foo" to compile and run a simple java program. You can also call other build systems (scons, cmake, ...) this way.


6

SMART over USB is generally either not possible, or is done with (bridge) vendor-specific commands, so there's no one way to get things done. smartctl knows about a few specific bridge chips. Check the manpage for a list. This is horrible, but the only 100% reliable way to access SMART on a disk is to unplug it from the bridge and stick it on a proper host ...


6

I'm a pretty hard-core Emacs user but still, for developing C++ I prefer Qt-Creator (don't be afraid because of the name, it works well for non-QT-projects) as Emacs lacks good project support and stable code completion The pros: Can import CMakeFiles.txt into an automatically created project Best code completion you'll find on Linux, sometimes even ...


4

In addition to mentioned by others I would advice to look at: Anjuta - Gnome IDE KDevelop - KDE IDE


4

There isn't an appropriate value of -d. The problem is that you're using a SATA↔USB mass storage bridge, and USB mass storage doesn't have a standard way to request ATA/SATA SMART data. So instead the controller has either no way or some vendor-specific way to get the data. smartctl knows a few of these; examples include usbjmicron and usbsubplus. So, if ...


4

I don't think you're looking in the right place. The functionality you're asking about is primarily one that would be provided by version control software. Specifically, use distributed revision control software, such as Bazaar, Git or Mercurial. Keep a repository on your local machine and one on your server. When you're satisfied with the changes, commit to ...


4

There's the same type of problem for awesomewm and probably quite a few other window managers. The dmw wiki has a section on this: Fixing misbehaving Java applications. The solution proposed is to change the window manager name by installing wmname, and then running: $ wmname LG3D If that works, make sure that is called at every X session startup. The ...


4

You mentioned above that you're looking for "crash-proof-ness", and you said that Unity appears unstable. Don't confuse the stability of the window manager with the stability of the distribution or the kernel. Unity is a quite new window manager (some say it was released before it was ready for production use and still needs polishing), and it may take ...


4

There is an Eclipse Color Theme Plugin that might be able to help you :)


3

Stay with gcc compiler and Vim as an IDE. There are a lot of plugins for Vim that improves the experience in almost coding languages, but you should learn Vim first if you want to take advantage of that though. On the other side, I think just a few "firms" are naming "C#" and "Linux" in the same context.


3

In the VM, is the pxaregsmodule.c at /home/user/Dropbox/pxaregsmodule.c or /home/dknapp/Dropbox/pxaregsmodule.c? It seems to me like the symbolic link pxaregsmodule.c in /projectroot/modules is broken since it points to the wrong directory. What happens if you: tail ~/projectroot/modules/pxaregsmodule.c Does any code show up? If this is the problem, you ...


3

What I would recommend is that you don't stick to any IDE's per say. Let your code stay as flat files in the filesystem, and use independent tools (Emacs, the GCC toolchain, Ctags, etc) you have to for implementing the operations you have to implement. That will keep your codebase IDE-independant and free of clutter that surrounds it (like .project files, ...


3

I use a vim that has Python interpreter compiled in. I source a python file that has this function: def pyterm(filename="", interactive=1): cmd = "%s %s %s " % (PYTHON, "-i" if interactive else "", filename) if "DISPLAY" in os.environ: return run_config(os.environ.get("XTERM"), cmd) else: return os.system(cmd) And map it to a ...


3

Eclipse is a good choice, because one IDE to many language. In addition you can install vim plugin, etc. How to install c/c++: Menu: Help->Install New Software->Add http://download.eclipse.org/tools/cdt/releases/galileo http://www.eclipse.org/cdt/ In addition, you should see: http://www.eclipse.org/linuxtools/downloads.php


3

A purpose-built IDE would sort of defeat the purpose of shell scripting, not to mention that it's nearly impossible to do, because most of what shell does is calling external commands - how do you debug that? Debugging with checkpoints is counterintuitive for a shell - shell scripts usually operate heavily on files and thus have destructive side-effects on ...


2

It's very much a personal preference, so I don't think I can do much more than tell you what I use. I have Emacs set up with Flymake mode, which periodically compiles the file you're working on and parses the compiler output to figure out what errors you've made. It hilights the errors/warnings in the buffer, and shows the associated compiler error message


2

If you're doing C development under Unix/Linux, you absolutely have to be using Cscope if the project is any significant size. Cscope is a developer's tool for browsing source code -- jump to function foobar's definition, find all places where the variable foo is referenced, find all files including bar.h, change all occurrences of bar into baz, etc. Also, ...


2

I persisted with Vim for a while, it's worth knowing the VIM basics as you will always find a UNIX box somewhere that only has that, but I tried Emacs and haven't looked back. Eclipse is a 'modern' alternative, I have all three on my system !


2

Try the quickrun plugin for Vim. The page includes a link to github, which is the latest version and which is what I use. The advantage in using this plugin as opposed to doing :!, the output from the command will be collected and shown in a split window. Also, by default that plugin will hang your vim instance when you ask it to execute a command, but it ...


2

I'm currently running CentOS on some old hardware and using a USB interface to a hot swap bay for testing these, but it's not really an ideal solution. A USB-to-SATA adapter probably won't work for this, because they usually don't allow you to run SMART commands. I'd use SATA directly for this. If that's not an option, you will need a USB-to-SATA ...


2

Yes I think it's worth it. For instance what if you were creating/editing a bash script? Or peeking inside a text file and making a single-character change, an IDE might not be suitable or be overkill for such simple tasks. vi/vim will fire up almost instantaneously. Also, when accessing a system remotely having a text based editor available is useful. vi ...


2

I believe the whole idea about editors is kinda warped. I won't claim, that only I know what editor to use when. But we are forced to use editors that we aren't particularly fond of, usually. When using IDE's, we're all forced to use the editor that comes with it. Even though those editors can be tailored a bit, it's not that we can plug-in vim as IDE ...


2

the debugging features provided by gdb are based on the set of symbols that comes with your compiled code. Actually there isn't a debug version available for the STL, but there are at least 2 portings that can add debug symbols to your code: http://www.stlport.org/ http://code.google.com/p/stl-debug/ gdb without debugging symbols is useless, so you have ...



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