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5

If you have a 64-bit processor, an alternative would be to try a 64-bit kernel. According to this RedHat white paper, a typical server experiences around 1% performance hit, and other tasks suffered a performance hit of 0% - 10%. In addition to having more available memory, enabling PAE means you have an NX bit, which can increase security.


4

The PAE kernel includes Physical Address Extension. This increases the usable memory from 4 GB to 64 GB. The cost is that these kernels take up a little more memory and don't run on some old processors.


3

It sounds like you're misunderstanding top's output. %id is the amount of time the CPU has been idle, that is, doing nothing.


3

I - You can download boot.iso (for cd) or all.img (usb) from ftp.linux.org.tr (or other mandriva mirrors) II - You should follow these instructions at this mandriva wiki page.


3

AMD Fusion Brazos (Zacate E-350 and Ontario C-50) is just supported in Linux kernel 2.6.38 and above. But it's not fully supported. I mean you can't get the similar performance of Fusion platform in Linux environment that you can get in Windows environment. Reasons? The Open Source drivers for the Fusion platform on Linux is not fully polished. ...


3

For the distro, you might want to give Damn Small Linux a go. If you install it to your harddrive, it's a minimal Debian installation configured to be light on resources. When it comes to compiling, just compile with -march=geode. That option is defined on any i386/x86-64 gcc, so no real need to cross-compile. If you want to run the binary on your compiler ...


2

I recently installed Gentoo on an Alix with an AMD Geode LX processor via the Binhost feature of portag3. As you say, it's an x86 one (i586 to be precise), but several benchmarks are showing that i486 is the better way. It has a few better results, and almost no lack of features (compared to i586). Since I havent installed any kind of graphical user ...


2

Debian and Ubuntu support every Intel processor from the 485. With Debian, the minimal install is very small (~500Mo) and Ubuntu provide the XUbuntu "flavour" dedicated to small configurations. ubuntu 10.10 and above no longer support x86 architectures below i686 You can emulate this machine with any virtualisation software able to emulate a i586 CPU ...


2

As I see it the APU is a combination of the CPU and GPU integrated into one thing, so support should be fairly easy. I don't know about specific details, but AMD said that APU is fully supported in Linux.


2

Qemu is not the right tool for the job. Qemu emulates a whole computer, including the CPU. This is useful to run a virtual machine on where the virtual hardware is different from the host hardware, but this is not required here. Furthermore, emulating an amd64 CPU is likely to be slower than emulating an i386 CPU. This alone might explain the difference ...


2

Painfully slow might be in relation to your I/O. I came to find out the hard way that this might be remedied by telling libvirt to use the virtio. To verify mine: # virsh list Id Name State ---------------------------------- 11 ca running 13 new_box running ..... # virsh dumpxml ca|awk ...


2

That's the normal state in Virtualbox, see here.


2

Unless you're running a pre-2.6 kernel, you won't be using the int x80 method for invoking most system calls. They have been replaced in favor of the systenter/sysexit method since kernel 2.6 (started in the 2.5 series) for things that matter. Note that if you have old binaries that were built against older kernels, those could still be using the int x80 ...


1

You are running an amd64 kernel on an amd64 processor (x86_64 and amd64 are synonyms). You are running an i386 distribution. In other words, you are running 32-bit binaries with a 64-bit kernel. See Linux command to return number of bits (32 or 64)? for some background. On Linux, you can run i386 executables on an amd64 kernel, but not the other way round. ...


1

You're barking up the wrong tree. Having the interrupts go to both CPUs would make performance worse, not better. For one thing, it would mean the software decoder would constantly be interrupted. For another, it would mean the interrupt code would be less likely to be hot in cache. There are many other reasons this would make things worse.


1

What kernel are you using? The kernel needs to have BIGMEM support. Fedora 15 offers BIGMEM support in PAE kernels. So install (for example) the Fedora 15 2.6.38 PAE kernel.


1

The AMD Geode LX is an i686 processor (the NOPL instruction is not part of the i686 specifications). I use it with Arch Linux. The only things you have to take care of are to press TAB at Arch installer's boot screen and add the option arch=i686, and set Architecture = i686 in your pacman.conf. Unfortunatelly, uname -m still delivers i586



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