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/*/aaa does not match /aaa and this is the reason why find cannot find /aaa/bbb If you don't like to start the find at / and if you don't have a recent find like the portable sfind that supports -path you need a better manual start list.


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Use the -path option for this case: find / -type d -path '*/aaa/bbb' From the man page for find: File name matches shell pattern pattern. The metacharacters do not treat / or . specially; so, for example, find . -path "./sr*sc" will print an entry for a directory called `./src/misc' (if one exists). Cross-Platform Compatibility Edit: I ...


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I can only speak to AIX. AIX doesn't have a command that will programatically show the limits. The closest you'll get for AIX is to use this table and code appropriately.


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If you are using ksh93 (not ksh or sh), then you can use $'\n' to represent a newline character. ${RPT_DT%${RPT_DT#* * }}$'\n'${RPT_DT#* * }



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