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I know this doesn't answer your question but if the user was missing from /etc/passwd then someone with sudo/root access at some time deleted the user. Being that the user's home directory was also missing gives me the impression that someone ran a not only did a userdel they did a rm -rf /home/user. That implies that there was intent to delete. You can ...


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You actually want to disable the Desktop directory and prevent the DE to automatically recreate it. Short answer: Edit ~/.config/user-dirs.dirs and change XDG_DESKTOP_DIR value to $HOME: XDG_DESKTOP_DIR="$HOME" Long answer: How to disable/relocate the User Directories (Desktop, Pictures, Documents etc) ? On a freedesktop compliant DE this is done via ...


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Sure you can add a separate home partition. Add the new harddisk, partition it (using fdisk or gdisk), format it (i.e., create a fs using mkfs), move the files under /home to the new fs and edit fstab accordingly so that the system mounts the new fs on top of /home. If you are using SELinux, you may have issues logging in because of extended attributes not ...


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If you can increase the capacity depends on whether you have LVM installed or not and whether your filesystem supports growing (ext{2,3,4}, btrfs, reiserfs, xfsm, and maybe some others, do) If you do have LVM you can add the new disc add it to the current /home (or if that is not a separate partition /) using vgextend and lvextend. If you don't have LVM, ...


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I'm having the same problem using Raspbian. After adding a user named "bill", raspbian failed to create the user's home directory. Although I had created the user account using "useradd bill && passwd bill", and although the /etc/passwd file contained the expected path to /home/bill as the home directory, the actual path "/home/bill" was never ...


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/home is where all users usually get their home directories created under. Examples: /home/marcelo /home/joe The /home may sometimes reside in a different filesystem (i.e., a separate harddisk, another partition in the same harddisk or even network mounted) than the / (main system's filesystem). For this (and probably other reasons as well), the root ...


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In case of trouble during booting (resulting in other volumes not being mounted) it helps that root (which is used for repair logins) has its home directory available. /home is often on a different volume.


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According to the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard (FHS): /home : User home directories (optional) /root : Home directory for the root user (optional) A typical non-root user's home directory would be /home/$USER. /root is also special in that (in many distros) /root is readable only to root (700), but a normal user's home directory has read access to others ...



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