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1

This is primary opinion based: it depends on what you expect the users to do with that space. My opinion is that the only reasonable usage for a /home partition would be to build software which is supposed to be run in the cluster, and as testing area for such software (so that people can know whether a program will run or not in the cluster without ...


5

Unplugging the USB device is not the same as unmounting it. The system still thinks it's there. You may be able to unmount it still: umount /home Have the device plugged in when you do that. Everything could well be tied up in knots, depending on what else you've done in between times, and umount might give you errors. In that case, just reboot the ...


5

By default, scp remote paths are interpreted relative to the home directory, so you don't need the ~ at all: scp user@remote.host.com:some/file/name filename will download some/file/name from the home directory of user and save it as filename locally. When you want to use an absolute file path on the remote server, start it with /: scp host:/etc/passwd ...


0

It is my understanding there are severe problems if you ever log in to X as root with root's home directory set to /. In the old days the protection provided by /root was considered unnecessary and having root's home dir as / was merely untidy but not so much anymore. root didn't used to have full sessions but now he does if some people misuse the system.


11

Yes. /root has 700 permission (rwx------) whereas / has 555 (r-xr-xr-x) permissions for all users. Now if you use various common utilities you would have /root/.config with rwxr-xr-x permissions. If you were in /, that directory becomes accessible to anyone on the server, whereas if it was in /root it would not be. Having root's data accessible to any user ...


2

The best approach is to put your dot files under version control. To make them available on a new machine, simply check them out. If you don't care about privacy, you can put your files on a site like Github. If you do, you can check out over SSH. On a virtual machine, if available, you can check out from a mounted host filesystem. Version control gives you ...


2

Add the shared volume to your /etc/fstab file so it mounts automatically at boot. Then run the following commands: mount -a ln -s shared_volume_mount_point/path_to_My_Music /home/My_Music ln -s shared_volume_mount_point/path_to_My_Videos /home/My_Videos ln -s shared_volume_mount_point/path_to_My_Documents /home/My_Documents Navigating should be pretty ...



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