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History is loaded from file during bash startup. And file is saved automatically when bash exits. During bash execution, history is kept in memory and not synchronized with history file nor multiple bash instances. You can use history builtin command to manually save your current history to file or to load it from disk (see help history for details). Only ...


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Now, what is it? A socket, or "socket" can be several things: First of all, it is a thought model and an application programming interface (API). That means you have a set of rules you need to follow and a set of functions that you can use to write programs that do something, according to a precisely specified contract. In this particular case, something ...


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For udp or tcp over IP, A socket address is the combination of an IP address and a port number. An IP address is the address of a machine on the internet e.g. unix.stackexchange.com has address 198.252.206.140 However each machine must be able to provide more than one service, so most machines will provide http (web pages) on port 80, and ssh on port 22, ...


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In the simplest terms, a socket is a pseudo-file that represents a network connection. Once a socket has been created (using the proper primitives, and the proper parameters to identify the other host), writes to the socket are turned into network packets that get sent out, and data received from the network can be read from the socket. In one regard, ...


11

export foo=bar is not supported by the Bourne shell. That was introduced by ksh. In the Bourne shell, you'd do: foo=bar export foo or: foo=bar; export foo or with set -k: export foo foo=bar Now, the behaviour of: export foo=bar varies from shell to shell. The problem is that assignments and simple command arguments are parsed and interpreted ...


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It is not a bashism but a POSIX compliant syntax. It actually started as a kshism quite a long time ago and was later adopted by almost all Bourne syntax based shells. The only notorious exception is /bin/sh on Solaris 10 and older which sticks to the legacy Bourne shell syntax. Hopefully, Solaris 11 uses a POSIX compliant shell as /bin/sh. By the way, ...



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