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3

apt itself keeps nicer log files in /var/log/apt/history.log (and rotated variants); these track the start and end date and time of every set of apt operations (including those initiated by aptitude), the requesting user (when invoked using sudo), and the actions: installed packages, upgraded packages, removed packages, purged packages... Here's an example: ...


3

It defaulted to off when it was introduced, in bash 2.02: @@ -119,6 +123,10 @@ int interactive = 0; /* Non-zero means that the shell was started as an interactive shell. */ int interactive_shell = 0; +/* Non-zero means to send a SIGHUP to all jobs when an interactive login + shell exits. */ +int hup_on_exit = 0; + ...


10

Unix was making that distinction since the very beginning, i.e. since version 1 was released in 1971. The system was booting to multi-user mode (i.e. users connected to the available serial interfaces, tty0 to tty5 but provision was made to add four more ttys). Unix v1 manual states for the section 4, tty page: By appropriate console switch settings, it ...


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The most probable reason for using the terms single user vs. multi user is that directly after the boot, UNIX did only have a read-only mounted root filesystem. The next thing that was done was to check the root filesystem (aprox. 1MB) and re-mount it read/write. Then the /usr filesystem was checked and mounted. Since users can login only after /usr/ was ...


-1

Originally, init would bring up a shell on the console in single-user mode, and when that shell exited, it would bring up the login (actually getty) program on the serial ports, along with mounting the rest of the file systems and starting whatever daemons were configured to run then. This was all controlled by the entries in /etc/inittab. This was all ...


9

RFC 1945 (1996) says 5.1.1 Method The Method token indicates the method to be performed on the resource identified by the Request-URI. The method is case-sensitive. Method = "GET" ; Section 8.1 | "HEAD" ; Section 8.2 | "POST" ; Section 8.3 ...


1

This is probably just a result from the definition of those operations in the RFC using all caps. For other (older) protocols, even if the actual implementation might not be case sensitive, the operations' description in RFC is in all caps as well. It might be because that makes them stand out in the text only documents in which there is no other way to ...



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