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The point of hibernation is to power down the hardware. It does not really help you run multiple operating systems on the same hardware. You can do that, but only if the OSes are completely independent (or close enough. If you have a single OS, you need to be careful not to hibernate a deleted kernel. It's best not to do kernel upgrades until you're ready ...


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If you hibernate a dual-boot machine, unmount all shared partitions. Make sure that the hibernation fails if any of the shared partitions can't be unmounted. You can relax this a little and set one of the OSes as the “owner” of a shared partition, under the following conditions: Only the owner ever mounts the partition read-write. Other OSes only mount it ...


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I do think the shared filesystem situation is kind of evil :(. It is mitigated by a patchwork of different measures, but there are undoubtedly plenty of holes you can fall through. The shared partition case is kind of nice in that once you know it's horribly dangerous, you can "just" avoid setting the system up that way. Despite how useful it would be if ...


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It will use the swap partition, (especially) if it has an fstab entry for it. However your problem is not only with the swap partition, but also with all other filesystem partitions. You're not allowed to mount any of them as long as they're still mounted by the hibernated system. Only one OS is allowed to mount a filesystem at a time, and with Hibernation,...



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