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7

In PulseAudio, each sound card has a profile set associated with it. A profile set contains multiple profiles, and those are the profiles that you see when listing the cards (or when looking in the various PulseAudio GUIs). There is a default profile, which primarily contains things useful for analog sound output. There is also an extra-hdmi profile that ...


2

So you've tried four OSs, including Windows, and it didn't work with any of them? Then it's very likely to be a hardware problem. The data in aplay -L doesn't preclude a hardware problem because that information comes from your audio chipset, not the actual HDMI port. If it's still under warranty, contact the manufacturer.


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I don't see anything wrong with parsing the output of ddccontrol. DDC is the right way to get the information you want. Unlike with VGA, where DDC was created, the HDMI connector was designed to include DDC from the start. They even went back and modified the DDC standard to add more features for HDMI, calling it E-DDC. On Linux, the userland tool for ...


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The first thing you have to do is confirm whether or not the kernel really has a driver available for the display. Search online for the card in relation to linux to see if you can find out the name of the driver. If you have a kernel source tree available, you can also look for clues with there: find src/ -name Kconfig -print -exec grep 'some phrase' ...


1

Thanks to brm's comment and reading the xrandr man page, I figured out what the issue was. There were two problems: First, I'd always used xrandr's -s option, which specifies size, rather than the newer --mode option. This almost always works anyway, and in this case switching to xrandr --output HDMI-0 --mode 1920x1080 didn't fix things. However, it was ...


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Your monitor provides information about itself using a digital standard called EDID. The kernel reads this information when detecting a display device and automatically configures its display to match as near as it can the display device's native resolution. LCD devices can, in truth, support only one resolution - their native resolution - and emulate all ...


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Put this in your /etc/asound.conf pcm.softvolPhonon { type softvol slave.pcm "default:CARD=0" control { name "HDMI" card 0 } min_dB -51.0 max_dB 0.0 resolution 100 hint { show on description "hdmi with extra Volume Control" } } You need to replace card 0 with the hdmi audio output in you system.


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If it has a unique driver, you can blacklist the module. (Edit: Better Fedora link)


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You should probably simply use kscreen instead, which should solve all your issues. It will remember the settings of a previously connected screen and will restore them, once you connect it again. If you still have such issues while still using kscreen, it should be worth a bug report. As Kubuntu 12.04 is quite old, you probably should have a look at this. ...


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There is no "Best" solution, it is really up to the user which solution is "Best". Regardless of this, you have a few options that suit your needs... Ubuntu server This would suit your needs after a few apt-get install commands. you don't need to be an expert to use terminal commands :P (see tab auto-complete)" http://www.ubuntu.com/server/ OpenELEC ...


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Based on the specifications at the link you provided, I don't believe this motherboard has CEC support. It's a fairly new standard, especially to the PC world.. You might try looking at http://www.pulse-eight.com/store/products/104-usb-hdmi-cec-adapter.aspx for an alternate solution. I haven't tried the device as of yet, but it is an intriguing looking ...


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On television, go to Menu -> Input -> Edit name -> HDMI and set it to PC or DVI PC.



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