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Hardware platform (uname -i) tells you what architecture the software was compiled for, typically 32-bit or 64-bit. The uname -m tells you the architecture about the system itself, think motherboard here. The uname -p tells you the architecture of the CPU. What's the difference between system and CPU I believe these 2 switches, -m and -p are what confuse ...


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When a device file is created by mknode, the major and minor numbers are supplied. These are how Linux identifies the underlying hardware device associated with a device file. In most cases they major number identifies the driver while the minor distinguishes the different devices the driver controls. As such the numbers must be unique to each device or it ...


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From The Linux Programming Interface, ยง14.1 Each device file has a major ID number and a minor ID number. The major ID identifies the general class of device, and is used by the kernel to look up the appropriate driver for this type of device. The minor ID uniquely identifies a particular device within a general class. The major and minor IDs of a ...


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Major Number for SCSI disks is 8. There will be a separate major number for every disk type. As @Kiwy said in his comment, major number is used to identify disk type, and the minor number represents sub division of major hardware disk. Source In the above screenshot, you can see that the major number for encrypted lvm partitions are differ from the ...


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You have 2 video cards installed from the output. product: RV620/M82 [Mobility Radeon HD 3450/3470] vendor: Hynix Semiconductor (Hyundai Electronics) configuration: driver=radeon latency=0 product: Mobile 4 Series Chipset Integrated Graphics Controller vendor: Intel Corporation configuration: driver=i915 latency=0 The first is a ATI Radeon card, ...


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sfdisk -l will give you detailed info about hardware/physical disks even if they are not mounted. the program is pre-installed on all Linux variants that I have used, but you have to be root to use it.


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If you do a 'more /etc/mtab' you will see what the system has currently mounted with all the mount attributes. This file is maintained by the kernel with help from "/etc/fstab" and the autofs.


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To return the number of block devices, without fancy tools nor obscure syntax or parameters: ls /sys/block/* | grep block | grep sd | wc -l In my local test cases, 47 on my biggest war-machine and 1 on my laptop.


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This is likely a system board, cabling or power supply issue. If your SATA drives, the OCZ and Intel X25, are connected to the motherboard, they're probably the culprits. There's no indication that the Intel 910 is impacted.


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In terminal type: # hdparm -I /dev/sd? | grep 'Serial\ Number' EDIT: You can also use lshw or smartctl lshw # lshw -class disk smartctl # smartctl -i /dev/sda If you are missing those tools, just install following packages # apt-get install smartmontools # apt-get install lshw


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By using hdparm you can see your Harddisk serial number from terminal. Open your terminal and type as hdparm -I /dev/sd?|grep -E "Number|/dev"


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After all, I fixed the problem at least partially. Apparently, yum install fprintd-pam did the trick. Now, I can use the fingerprint reader for sudo authentication and removing a screen lock but not yet for the initial login screen (which I think is quite weird, since the login screen and the screen lock prompt look pretty much the same). Any further ...



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