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2

The BIOS whitelist stops the laptop early in the boot process - an error message is shown similar to the ones you see when some motherboards have no keyboard or other mandatory peripheral connected. Once the laptop is past the BIOS stage and loading the OS, the whitelist is redundant. In fact, the OS will probably not be aware of it's existence and will ...


0

iw list will also tell you the allowed max power output by frequency. The number in brackets is the max power. I'm not aware of any other way of finding the absolute maximum of the device. Frequencies: * 2412 MHz [1] (20.0 dBm) * 2417 MHz [2] (20.0 dBm) * 2422 MHz [3] (20.0 dBm) ...


2

iwlist <interface> txpower tells you that information, if device provides it. Eg; # iwlist eth0 txpower eth0 8 available transmit-powers : 5 dBm (3 mW) 7 dBm (5 mW) 9 dBm (7 mW) 11 dBm (12 mW) 13 dBm (19 mW) 15 dBm (31 mW) 17 dBm ...


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It is related to which country you live and have a look at WIFI power by country Some software allow you to go higher than maximum allowed power but that is illegal.


0

Do you need the machine ID to change when the hardware changes? Is the machine ID being used to protect something? The best way I believe to have a "consistent" machine ID is by storing a random string somewhere on the system and that way if any of the hardware changes, then the machine ID won't change either. This is also good for virtualized systems where ...


4

Many modern distributions ship a file /etc/machine-id containing a most probably unique hexadecimal 32-character string. It originates from systemd, where a manpage has more information, and may be appropriate for your purpose.


4

Firstly, please note that the CPUID is definitely not a commonly accessible uniquely identifying marker for any system later than an Intel Pentium III. While hashing it with MAC addresses may lead to unique markers certainly, this is due only to the unique qualities of the MACs themselves and the CPUID in that case is nothing more than circumstantial. ...


6

How about these two: $ sudo dmidecode -t 4 | grep ID | sed 's/.*ID://;s/ //g' 52060201FBFBEBBF $ ifconfig | grep eth1 | awk '{print $NF}' | sed 's/://g' 0126c9da2c38 You can then combine and hash them with: $ echo $(sudo dmidecode -t 4 | grep ID | sed 's/.*ID://;s/ //g') \ $(ifconfig | grep eth1 | awk '{print $NF}' | sed 's/://g') | sha256sum ...


0

All points out to be a bug/regression that started at FreeBSD 9.1 kern/173435 And sadly, there is no workaround available. Maybe you could give more details of your issue(hardware, FreeBSD version) on kern/173435.



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