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Well, the obvious way is to connect the two ports to each other, using a serial cable, without the two USB/serial adapters. Since you're not doing that, I presume its because you want the computer to do something—for example, this would be a reasonably common setup for reverse-engineering the protocol between the two devices. Snooper is a program for just ...


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My server produces its encryption key based on hardware data such as CPU type, available memory, network MAC address, ... that enables the machine to reboot itself unsupervised, and if you took out the disk and put it into another server, it could not decrypt itself. But it's a moot point in an embedded system, or indeed anywhere you have root access, since ...


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I have used an internal GPG secure card for a similar purpose on a dedicated system that is up 24*7, with software that: decrypts the protected parts of the software before they get loaded into memory that software and the loaded protected software check for snooping on memory (i.e. process on the system not condoned by us) as well as for unsigned ...


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You can bind encrypted data to a specific device using a Trusted Platform Module (TPM). These have become quite common in x86 laptops over the last few years, and can be installed in many servers too. Using a TPM, you can generate an encryption key which only exists in the module, and encrypt data using that; if you generate a key which can't be backed up, ...


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You cannot really rely on cryptographic secrets in this case, because your embedded PC will need to know those secrets to function, and so the attacker will potentially know them as well. One solution would be to find or make a secret which is unreadable from outside (in a similar way as @psusi suggested). It's hard to suggest something without knowing what ...


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Use a microprocessor that has built in flash that can not be read externally. Many modern ARM chips have such capability. In that flash you put your code and encryption keys needed to access any external storage.


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You have to modify your BIOS or the ID of your card. See the Problem with unauthorized MiniPCI network card article on the ThinkWiki for details.


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Not unless you're willing to replace the BIOS. IBMs are usually considered "corporate" machines and this restriction is a "feature" so that you as a user can not install an unsecured or untested Wi-Fi card and bring down your corporate network. Even in the "home" space, it is still considered a "security feature". This is a design decision by IBM and ...



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