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49

This is highly platform-dependent. Also different methods may treat edge cases differently (“fake” disks of various kinds, RAID volumes, …). On modern udev installations, there are symbolic links to storage media in subdirectories of /dev/disk, that let you look up a disk or a partition by serial number (/dev/disk/by-id/), by UUID (/dev/disk/by-uuid), by ...


26

While openness is certainly part of it, I think the key factor is Linus Torvald's continued insistence that all of the work, from big to small, has a place in the mainline Linux kernel, as long as it's well done. If he'd decided at some point to draw a line and say "okay, for that fancy super-computer hardware, we need a fork", then completely separate ...


20

If your system supports a procfs, you can get much information of your running system. Its an interface to the kernels data structures, so it will also contain information about your hardware. For example to get details about the used CPU you could cat /proc/cpuinfo For more information you should see the man proc. More hardware information can be obtained ...


16

What you're asking for is called DMA. You need to write a driver to reserve this memory. Yes, I realize you said you didn't want the OS to intervene, and a driver becomes part of the OS, but in absence of a driver's reservation, the kernel believes all memory belongs to it. (Unless you tell the kernel to ignore the memory block, per Aaron's answer, that ...


15

I can address your question, having previously worked with the Linux FB. How Linux Does Its FB. First you need to have FrameBuffer support in your kernel, corresponding to your hardware. Most modern distributions have support via kernel modules. It does not matter if your distro comes preconfigured with a boot logo, I don't use one and have FB support. ...


14

If you want the OS to totally ignore it, you need to make a memory hole using "memmap." See this reference. For example, if you want 512M at the 2GB barrier, you can put "memmap=512M$2G" on your kernel command line. You will need to check your dmesg to find a contiguous hole to steal so you don't stomp on any devices; that is specific to your ...


13

Let /dev/sda be the new drive on which to test destructive-rw and /dev/sdb the old drive where you want non-destructive-r # badblocks -wsv /dev/sda # badblocks -sv /dev/sdb -s gives the process indicator -v gives verbose output -w enables destructive read-write -n would be non-destructive read-write Read-only testing is the default and doesn't need ...


11

If your partition is ext2,ext3 or ext4, you can use the e2label command to set the label: e2label - Change the label on an ext2/ext3/ext4 filesystem SYNOPSIS e2label device [ new-label ] after you have set the label to, say, "data" you can add a line in /etc/fstab like this one LABEL=data /mnt/data ext4 noauto,users,rw 0 0 then you just ...


11

hwinfo helps: > hwinfo --disk 21: IDE 00.0: 10600 Disk [Created at block.245] Unique ID: 3OOL.8MZXfAWnuH8 Parent ID: w7Y8.1T_0outZkp6 SysFS ID: /class/block/sda SysFS BusID: 0:0:0:0 SysFS Device Link: /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1f.2/host0/target0:0:0/0:0:0:0 Hardware Class: disk Model: "Hitachi HTS54322" Vendor: ...


11

You can use hdparm to retrieve information about your hard drives, eg., hdparm -I /dev/sda Where I, according to the man page: -I Request identification info directly from the drive, which is displayed in a new expanded format with considerably more detail than with the older -i option. For SCSI drives, use sdparm.


10

@Giles says this is highly platform-dependent. Here's one such example. I'm running a CentOS 5.5 system. This system has 4 disks and a 3ware RAID controller. In my case, lshw -class disk, cat /proc/scsi/scsi and parted --list shows the RAID controller (3ware 9650SE-4LP). This doesn't show the actual disks: only shows the 3ware RAID controller which ...


10

From The Linux Programming Interface, §14.1 Each device file has a major ID number and a minor ID number. The major ID identifies the general class of device, and is used by the kernel to look up the appropriate driver for this type of device. The minor ID uniquely identifies a particular device within a general class. The major and minor IDs of a ...


9

From the information you've given, I surmise that: You have a black box device which you can communicate with only by plugging a USB mass storage device into it. Physically plugging and unplugging a USB drive is not acceptable, you won't have physical access after deployment. If any of these assumptions is false, you'll have an easier time. What you're ...


8

A pending unreadable sector is one that returned a read error and which the drive has marked for remapping at the first possible opportunity. However, it can't do the remapping until one of two things happens: The sector is reread successfully The sector is rewritten Until then, the sector remains pending. So you have two corresponding ways to deal with ...


8

The HylaFAX Handbook has some documentation about making sure you have a compatible fax device. According to that document, external serial modems will work almost without exception, but some external USB modems may be softmodems and require a driver. Regarding internal modems, that document references some chipsets and model numbers that are known to work. ...


8

Check out this How do I detect the RAM memory chip specification from within a Linux machine question. This tool might help: http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/check-ram-speed-linux/ $ sudo dmidecode --type 17 | more Sample output: # dmidecode 2.9 SMBIOS 2.4 present. Handle 0x0018, DMI type 17, 27 bytes Memory Device Array Handle: 0x0017 Error ...


8

I think stress testing an SD card is in general problematic given 2 things: wear leveling There are no guarantees that one write to the next is actually exercising the same physical locations on the SD. Remember that most of the SD systems in place are actively taking a block as we know it and moving the physical location that backs it around based on the ...


7

you could have been writing to a file during a hard reset, or your hard drive could have problems. a fsck should fix it (you will have to umount the fs to do this). I'd check dmesg and smartctl -a /dev/hdx (latter is part of smartmontools ) to see if your HD is reporting any errors. I'd also run a non-destructive badblocks on the partition. You should also ...


7

You could check out lsusb -v On my system I get for example this line (and much more information): Port 6: 0000.0503 highspeed power enable connect Alternatively you can issue a: tail -f /var/log/kern.log in one terminal and then plug in the USB flash drive. On my system I get for example this message: Sep 15 22:10:40 foo kernel: ...


7

I'm running fedora 14 and lshw is not available here (at least not by default). However in my case, I used fdisk -l command (as a root user) to get the following output: Disk /dev/sda: 8589 MB, 8589934592 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1044 cylinders, total 16777216 sectors Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes ...


7

The quick and dirty way to disable it is with xmodmap: $ xmodmap -e 'clear Lock' The next question is what would you like to do with it? I usually make it either a Ctrl key: $ xmodmap -e 'keycode 66 = Control_L' Depending on your DE/WM, there is likely a way to do this in the GUI configuration. For example Gnome has a "keyboard layout" option on the ...


7

If your hardware is from a big vendor, say HP, Dell and so, they might have specific tools for what you're looking. I use to work with HP and they already have tools for reporting bad hardware. If that's not the case, then it'll be trickier (based on my experience), you already started well testing memory as it uses to be a usual failing point. Now if you ...


7

Linux hardware drivers are kernel modules. Because of the open source model and licensing of the kernel, very few of these are written by hardware manufacturers; most of them are reverse engineered or based on standardized public protocols. Pretty sure bluetooth is in the later realm, and also that things like mice and keyboards are in most cases totally ...


6

I and friends of mine made some good experiences with the tablets from Wacom. The Bamboo series contains different tablets in different pricing categories. My Bamboo for example is connected via USB, the pen as 2 Buttons, the tablet is only sensitive to the pen, has some more buttons and works with my linux out of the box. So this should satisfy your ...


6

To display a nice overview of my hardware, I use lshw -short, best run (as root). You can just run lshw plain of course, but I prefer the conciseness that the -short option offers. To check my HDD usage, I use df --human-readable, which should be available by default on your system (unlike lshw). Also, have a look at checking hardware on linux.


6

Is not so powerfull as a normal PC, but you should try arduino platform. You can buy a great and cheap unit here: http://www.libelium.com/ Google a little bit about arduino and you will find a lot of references and a big community


6

You could try using the tool monitor-edid, which produces output like this Name: DELL 2407WFP EISA ID: DELa017 EDID version: 1.3 EDID extension blocks: 0 Screen size: 52.0 cm x 33.0 cm (24.25 inches, aspect ratio 16/10 = 1.60) Gamma: 2.2 Digital signal Max video bandwidth: 170 MHz HorizSync 30-83 VertRefresh 56-76 # Monitor preferred modeline ...


6

As geekosaur and Tshepang are saying: Assuming that both distributions are using the same kernel, remaining differences should boil down to default configuration settings. It could be worth exploring a bit before switching distributions (changing settings is presumably quicker than installing a new OS), I suggest Check System > Preferences > Appearance > ...


6

Use xmodmap. The setting to disable your capslock is remove Lock = Caps_Lock This would be placed in your .xmodmap file. Another option - to disable it temporarily, you can use a setxkbmap option: setxkbmap -option ctrl:nocaps and then, to restore normal behavior: setxkbmap -option


6

I know a solution, but it requires 'root' privilege sadly. Anyway, you might still found it usefull: sudo lshw -class disk -class storage For each device it will print the logical name (e.g. /dev/sda) and bus info which in case of USB device would be something like 'usb@1:2'. Sample output: [...] *-storage description: SATA controller ...



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